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How to Make a Better Homework Schedule for Your Family

Verywell / Zackary Angeline

Why Homework Schedules Are Effective

  • Developing a Schedule

Other Considerations

Do you frequently have homework struggles with your child or teen? Or, does your student procrastinate doing their work? Maybe they even fail to turn in assignments. If any of these scenarios resonate with you, a better homework schedule may help.

A regular homework schedule establishes predictable times when homework is to be completed. Once the homework schedule has been in place for a few weeks, you may even find your child will begin doing their homework without needing to be reminded—although you may still need to monitor their work progress.

If you're struggling with homework completion in your household, or if you're having daily battles about allotting the appropriate amount of time to homework, you're not alone. That's why educators recommend developing a homework schedule—with input from your kids.

Once you set a homework schedule, then there are no questions about when the work will be done. It also communicates clear expectations; having a homework schedule helps kids understand what is required of them. And following the schedule encourages them to develop a good work ethic.

Schedules also help prevent procrastination and instill good habits like completing work on time. Homework routines also improve study skills and encourage kids to plan ahead.

Other benefits include developing your child's work ethic and organizational abilities. By helping your child complete their work at regular intervals, you are modeling how to manage time and projects in the future. When you send them off to college , they will know how to pace their work so they can avoid all-nighters at the end of the semester.

How to Develop a Homework Schedule

To develop a homework schedule, start by talking with your kids. Get their input on how they would like to manage their time and incorporate their homework into their daily routine. A successful homework schedule allows kids to finish their work and also have some free time.

Give Kids an Option

If you ask kids when they want to do their homework, their first answer might be "Never" or "Later." But if you dig a little deeper, your child may tell you what matters to them as they plan their schedule. This information will help you avoid scheduling homework during their favorite television program or when they usually get online to play games with friends.

When you include your child in the decision-making process, you also will get more buy-in from them because they know that their concerns were heard. You don't have to give them their way, but at least considering what they have to say will let them feel included. After all, this homework schedule is about them completing their homework.

Allow for Free Time

Some kids can step through the front door and buckle down on their homework right away. When this happens, they reap the reward of getting their work done early and having the rest of the evening to do what they want. But most kids need to eat and decompress a bit before tackling their assignments.

As you develop your homework schedule, keep in mind your child has already spent at least six hours in class. And this time doesn't include getting to and from school or participation in extracurricular programs . Allow kids some free time before beginning their homework if that's what they need to unwind.

Establish a Timeline

Generally, you can expect about 10 minutes of homework per grade level of school. This means that a third-grade student will need about 30 minutes to complete homework. However, the amount of time needed can vary dramatically between students, teachers, and schools.

Find out how much time your child's teacher expects homework to take each evening. If your child takes a lot of time to complete their work or struggles with homework , talk with the teacher. Your child may need extra instruction on a task or tutoring assistance—or fewer homework assignments.

Pick a Homework Spot

Designate a comfortable and efficient spot for your kids to do their homework. This workspace should be well-lit, stocked with supplies , and quiet. The workspace should allow you to provide some supervision. 

If you have multiple kids trying to complete their homework at one time, you may want to find a separate location for each child. Sometimes kids can complete their homework together at the kitchen table, but other times having siblings around can be distracting. Do what works best for your family.

Put It All Together

Now that you know what your child's needs and concerns are for finding a time to do homework, you need to come up with the actual plan. Creating a homework routine is really just one piece of creating a daily school year routine .

For the homework time itself, get it down on paper so you can see exactly what they will be doing and when they will be doing it. Do this for each day of the week if you have different activities on different weekdays. Students who are assigned larger projects will need to review their homework plans regularly to make adjustments as needed.

Expect your child to work consistently throughout the assigned time. Avoid having multiple homework sessions, such as one before dinner and a second one after dinner. Starting and stopping may mean children may spend more time getting into what they are doing than working continuously.

Be Consistent

Once you have decided on a time to do homework, stick to the plan! It usually takes about three weeks for most children to really get into the habit of their new schedule.

If your child or teen has difficulty maintaining concentration for the length of time that their homework should take, then you may want to carefully consider breaking up the work to take advantage of the time when your child can focus.

This added step is especially important for children and teens with depression or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They may benefit from multiple smaller work sessions and more frequent breaks.

Even though the idea behind creating a homework schedule is to get your child to work consistently and independently, you may need to look over their work when they are done. This is especially important for younger children.

Make sure they understand their assignments and that they completed a reasonable amount of work during the homework session. If you find your child is having trouble actually working during their homework time, troubleshoot to find out what might be the issue. Sometimes kids need extra help and other times they simply need more motivation to get their work done.

If you find that your child continues to struggle with homework even with a schedule in place, you might need to dig a little deeper. Consider discussing your child's issues with their teacher or pediatrician.

Sometimes kids are reluctant to complete their homework because of undiagnosed learning disabilities. It could be that your child struggles with reading comprehension or has a processing disorder. Or it could be that your child is struggling with a mental health issue like anxiety .

A Word From Verywell

Establishing a homework schedule allows children to build some important life skills that will help them as they navigate high school, college, and eventually the workforce. Practice is important when kids are learning new skills. So, having a nightly homework routine enhances your child's learning. Just be sure you aren't requiring homework time at the expense of being a kid. Having time to play is just as important to a child's development as learning new material.

National Institute of Mental Health. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder .

By Lisa Linnell-Olsen Lisa Linnell-Olsen has worked as a support staff educator, and is well-versed in issues of education policy and parenting issues.

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How to Enjoy Homework

Last Updated: April 19, 2023 Approved

This article was co-authored by Emily Listmann, MA . Emily Listmann is a private tutor in San Carlos, California. She has worked as a Social Studies Teacher, Curriculum Coordinator, and an SAT Prep Teacher. She received her MA in Education from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2014. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 86% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. This article has been viewed 52,262 times.

Homework can often feel stressful and boring. Unfortunately, if you're in school it's a part of life. If you consistently dread doing homework, you should look into ways you can enjoy the task. This way, school will be more pleasant for you overall. You can start with subjects that interest you, give yourself breaks and rewards, and work on changing your mentality regarding homework in general.

Planning Homework Time

Step 1 Choose a time of day when you feel energetic.

  • It may help to take a few days to measure your natural ebb and flow of energy. You may find that, during late afternoon, you feel a sudden slump in energy. However, as it gets closer to the evening hours, you may suddenly have a boost in energy. Therefore, instead of doing homework after school, try to do your homework after dinner each night.
  • You'll feel happier and more productive if you're studying during a time when you're experiencing a peak in energy. Homework will seem to go by faster, and you will not struggle as much to concentrate.

Step 2 Plan to start with subjects that interest you.

  • You can alternate between subjects you like and dislike. This can help give you motivation while moving through subjects that bore you. For example, if you love science but hate history, do half of your science assignment, then half of your history one, and then return to science.

Step 3 Find a good place to work.

  • Even small changes can make homework time more enjoyable. You could, for example, move your desk near the window. Natural light may lead to a more calming environment, and you can occasionally look up and enjoy the view.
  • You can also think about studying outside the house. If you love hanging out at a local coffee shop, try doing your homework there. You can get a latte or a coffee as a treat as you move through your homework.

Step 4 Make a homework playlist.

  • You may have to experiment with different songs. Some songs may be distracting. If a song makes you want to get up and dance, for example, it may not the best to include on a homework playlist, as you will lose focus in your homework. Some people find that classical music is very helpful when studying.
  • Not everyone can concentrate with music in the background. If you find music is making it harder for you to study, you may want to nix the playlists and focus on other means to enjoy your homework.

Giving Yourself Motivation

Step 1 Take breaks.

  • Good examples of what to do during your breaks are taking walks, meditating, stretching, or getting yourself a snack.
  • Many people find it's most effective to work in short spurts. You may want to plan to work in half hour to 45-minute intervals, for example, and then take a 5 to 10-minute break.
  • Be careful with breaks, however. Make sure you time your breaks wisely so they don't end up running over. If you allow yourself a 10 minute Facebook break every 40 minutes, set a timer on your phone to make sure you do not end up procrastinating on social media for hours.

Step 2 Give yourself rewards.

  • Be careful who you include in a study group. While you want to be able to enjoy yourself, you also want to get work done. Choose people who are serious enough students that you won't end up distracted all night.
  • Together as a group, you can brainstorm ways to have fun. For example, you can agree you'll do homework in silence for 40 minutes and then take a 15 minute break to chat.

Step 4 Time yourself.

  • Be careful, however, not to do sloppy work. If you're trying to break a record, you may speed through your homework. Strive to work efficiently rather than quickly.
  • Talk to your parents to see how the topic your studying may affect them in the present day.
  • Be careful not to get distracted in this extra research or you’ll lose focus on your homework. Set a timer for yourself so you don’t spend too much time doing it.

Changing Your Mindset About Learning

Step 1 Cultivate a sense of achievement.

  • It can help to make a to-do list. Your studies are items you can check off the list, allowing you to relax and unwind. You'll also feel a sense of achievement with each item you check off your list.
  • Stop and think about what you've accomplished when you finish your homework. Try to feel proud of yourself for getting your work done. You'll learn to work towards this sense of accomplishment in the future.

Step 2 Avoid procrastination.

  • If you dislike your writing assignments, pause and consider how good writing skills can help you get a job. If you dislike your computer class, try to keep in mind that basic computer skills will be important in college and the working world.

Expert Q&A

Emily Listmann, MA

  • If you have a friend who's a serious student, ask him or her for tips on how to make homework fun. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • If you are reviewing for a test, review it for 15 minutes then give yourself a break. Go back to studying for 15 minutes and then take another break. This method can help you to process the information, which in the end should result in better results! Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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Spend less time on homework

How many times have you found yourself still staring at your textbook around midnight (or later!) even when you started your homework hours earlier? Those lost hours could be explained by Parkinson’s Law, which states, “Work expands to fill the time available for its completion.” In other words, if you give yourself all night to memorize those geometry formulas for your quiz tomorrow, you’ll inevitably find that a 30 minute task has somehow filled your entire evening.

We know that you have more homework than ever. But even with lots and lots to do, a few tweaks to your study routine could help you spend less time getting more accomplished. Here are 8 steps to make Parkinson’s Law work to your advantage:

1. Make a list

This should be a list of everything that has to be done that evening. And we mean, everything—from re-reading notes from this morning’s history class to quizzing yourself on Spanish vocabulary.

2. Estimate the time needed for each item on your list

You can be a little ruthless here. However long you think a task will take, try shaving off 5 or 10 minutes. But, be realistic. You won’t magically become a speed reader.

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3. Gather all your gear

Collect EVERYTHING you will need for the homework you are working on (like your laptop for writing assignments and pencils for problem sets). Getting up for supplies takes you off course and makes it that much harder to get back to your homework.

The constant blings and beeps from your devices can make it impossible to focus on what you are working on. Switch off or silence your phones and tablets, or leave them in another room until it’s time to take a tech break.

Read More: How to Calculate Your GPA

5. Time yourself

Noting how much time something actually takes will help you estimate better and plan your next study session.

6. Stay on task

If you’re fact checking online, it can be so easy to surf on over to a completely unrelated site. A better strategy is to note what information you need to find online, and do it all at once at the end of the study session.

7. Take plenty of breaks

Most of us need a break between subjects or to break up long stretches of studying. Active breaks are a great way to keep your energy up. Tech breaks can be an awesome way to combat the fear of missing out that might strike while you are buried in your work, but they also tend to stretch much longer than originally intended. Stick to a break schedule of 10 minutes or so.

8. Reward yourself! 

Finish early? If you had allocated 30 minutes for reading a biology chapter and it only took 20, you can apply those extra 10 minutes to a short break—or just move on to your next task. If you stay on track, you might breeze through your work quickly enough to catch up on some Netflix.

Our best piece of advice? Keep at it. The more you use this system, the easier it will become. You’ll be surprised by how much time you can shave off homework just by focusing and committing to a distraction-free study plan.

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The school year is underway, and homework sheets, tests and papers are piling up. As we all adjust to a more normal school year, we’d love to hear your best homework tips.

What are some of your family’s strategies for focusing? How do you deal with homework screen time? What are ways that you help your child get through a tough problem — do you let them figure it out or sit down and do it together? Is there a way to make homework fun?

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Listen: we know homework isn’t fun, but it is a good way to reinforce the ideas and concepts you’ve learned in class. But what if you’re really struggling with your homework assignments? 

If you’ve looked online for a little extra help with your take-home assignments, you’ve probably stumbled across websites claiming to provide the homework help and answers students need to succeed . But can homework help sites really make a difference? And if so, which are the best homework help websites you can use? 

Below, we answer these questions and more about homework help websites–free and paid. We’ll go over: 

  • The basics of homework help websites 
  • The cost of homework help websites 
  • The five best homework websites out there 
  • The pros and cons of using these websites for homework help 
  • The line between “learning” and “cheating” when using online homework help 
  • Tips for getting the most out of a homework help website

So let’s get started! 

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The Basics About Homework Help Websites–Free and Paid

Homework help websites are designed to help you complete your homework assignments, plain and simple. 

What Makes a Homework Help Site Worth Using

Most of the best sites allow users to ask questions and then provide an answer (or multiple possible answers) and explanation in seconds. In some instances, you can even send a photo of a particular assignment or problem instead of typing the whole thing out! 

Homework help sites also offer more than just help answering homework questions. Common services provided are Q&A with experts, educational videos, lectures, practice tests and quizzes, learning modules, math solving tools, and proofreading help. Homework help sites can also provide textbook solutions (i.e. answers to problems in tons of different textbooks your school might be using), one-on-one tutoring, and peer-to-peer platforms that allow you to discuss subjects you’re learning about with your fellow students. 

And best of all, nearly all of them offer their services 24/7, including tutoring! 

What You Should Should Look Out For

When it comes to homework help, there are lots–and we mean lots –of scam sites out there willing to prey on desperate students. Before you sign up for any service, make sure you read reviews to ensure you’re working with a legitimate company. 

A word to the wise: the more a company advertises help that veers into the territory of cheating, the more likely it is to be a scam. The best homework help websites are going to help you learn the concepts you’ll need to successfully complete your homework on your own. (We’ll go over the difference between “homework help” and “cheating” a little later!) 

body-gold-piggy-bank-money

You don't need a golden piggy bank to use homework help websites. Some provide low or no cost help for students like you!

How Expensive Are the Best Homework Help Websites?

First of all, just because a homework help site costs money doesn’t mean it’s a good service. Likewise, just because a homework help website is free doesn’t mean the help isn’t high quality. To find the best websites, you have to take a close look at the quality and types of information they provide! 

When it comes to paid homework help services, the prices vary pretty widely depending on the amount of services you want to subscribe to. Subscriptions can cost anywhere from $2 to $150 dollars per month, with the most expensive services offering several hours of one-on-one tutoring with a subject expert per month.

The 5 Best Homework Help Websites 

So, what is the best homework help website you can use? The answer is that it depends on what you need help with. 

The best homework help websites are the ones that are reliable and help you learn the material. They don’t just provide answers to homework questions–they actually help you learn the material. 

That’s why we’ve broken down our favorite websites into categories based on who they’re best for . For instance, the best website for people struggling with math might not work for someone who needs a little extra help with science, and vice versa. 

Keep reading to find the best homework help website for you! 

Best Free Homework Help Site: Khan Academy

  • Price: Free!
  • Best for: Practicing tough material 

Not only is Khan Academy free, but it’s full of information and can be personalized to suit your needs. When you set up your account , you choose which courses you need to study, and Khan Academy sets up a personal dashboard of instructional videos, practice exercises, and quizzes –with both correct and incorrect answer explanations–so you can learn at your own pace. 

As an added bonus, it covers more course topics than many other homework help sites, including several AP classes.

Runner Up: Brainly.com offers a free service that allows you to type in questions and get answers and explanations from experts. The downside is that you’re limited to two answers per question and have to watch ads. 

Best Paid Homework Help Site: Chegg

  • Price: $14.95 to $19.95 per month
  • Best for: 24/7 homework assistance  

This service has three main parts . The first is Chegg Study, which includes textbook solutions, Q&A with subject experts, flashcards, video explanations, a math solver, and writing help. The resources are thorough, and reviewers state that Chegg answers homework questions quickly and accurately no matter when you submit them.  

Chegg also offers textbook rentals for students who need access to textbooks outside of their classroom. Finally, Chegg offers Internship and Career Advice for students who are preparing to graduate and may need a little extra help with the transition out of high school. 

Another great feature Chegg provides is a selection of free articles geared towards helping with general life skills, like coping with stress and saving money. Chegg’s learning modules are comprehensive, and they feature solutions to the problems in tons of different textbooks in a wide variety of subjects. 

Runner Up: Bartleby offers basically the same services as Chegg for $14.99 per month. The reason it didn’t rank as the best is based on customer reviews that say user questions aren’t answered quite as quickly on this site as on Chegg. Otherwise, this is also a solid choice!

body-photomath-logo-2

Best Site for Math Homework Help: Photomath

  • Price: Free (or $59.99 per year for premium services) 
  • Best for: Explaining solutions to math problems

This site allows you to t ake a picture of a math problem, and instantly pulls up a step-by-step solution, as well as a detailed explanation of the concept. Photomath also includes animated videos that break down mathematical concepts to help you better understand and remember them. 

The basic service is free, but for an additional fee you can get extra study tools and learn additional strategies for solving common math problems.

Runner Up: KhanAcademy offers in-depth tutorials that cover complex math topics for free, but you won’t get the same tailored help (and answers!) that Photomath offers. 

Best Site for English Homework Help: Princeton Review Academic Tutoring

  • Price: $40 to $153 per month, depending on how many hours of tutoring you want 
  • Best for: Comprehensive and personalized reading and writing help 

While sites like Grammarly and Sparknotes help you by either proofreading what you write via an algorithm or providing book summaries, Princeton Review’s tutors provide in-depth help with vocabulary, literature, essay writing and development, proofreading, and reading comprehension. And unlike other services, you’ll have the chance to work with a real person to get help. 

The best part is that you can get on-demand English (and ESL) tutoring from experts 24/7. That means you can get help whenever you need it, even if you’re pulling an all-nighter! 

This is by far the most expensive homework site on this list, so you’ll need to really think about what you need out of a homework help website before you commit. One added benefit is that the subscription covers over 80 other subjects, including AP classes, which can make it a good value if you need lots of help!  

body-studtypool-logo

Best Site for STEM Homework Help: Studypool

  • Best for: Science homework help
  • Price: Varies; you’ll pay for each question you submit

When it comes to science homework help, there aren’t a ton of great resources out there. The best of the bunch is Studypool, and while it has great reviews, there are some downsides as well. 

Let’s start with the good stuff. Studypool offers an interesting twist on the homework help formula. After you create a free account, you can submit your homework help questions, and tutors will submit bids to answer your questions. You’ll be able to select the tutor–and price point–that works for you, then you’ll pay to have your homework question answered. You can also pay a small fee to access notes, lectures, and other documents that top tutors have uploaded. 

The downside to Studypool is that the pricing is not transparent . There’s no way to plan for how much your homework help will cost, especially if you have lots of questions! Additionally, it’s not clear how tutors are selected, so you’ll need to be cautious when you choose who you’d like to answer your homework questions.  

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What Are the Pros and Cons of Using Homework Help Sites?

Homework help websites can be a great resource if you’re struggling in a subject, or even if you just want to make sure that you’re really learning and understanding topics and ideas that you’re interested in. But, there are some possible drawbacks if you don’t use these sites responsibly. 

We’ll go over the good–and the not-so-good–aspects of getting online homework help below. 

3 Pros of Using Homework Help Websites 

First, let’s take a look at the benefits. 

#1: Better Grades Beyond Homework

This is a big one! Getting outside help with your studies can improve your understanding of concepts that you’re learning, which translates into better grades when you take tests or write essays. 

Remember: homework is designed to help reinforce the concepts you learned in class. If you just get easy answers without learning the material behind the problems, you may not have the tools you need to be successful on your class exams…or even standardized tests you’ll need to take for college. 

#2: Convenience

One of the main reasons that online homework help is appealing is because it’s flexible and convenient. You don’t have to go to a specific tutoring center while they’re open or stay after school to speak with your teacher. Instead, you can access helpful resources wherever you can access the internet, whenever you need them.

This is especially true if you tend to study at off hours because of your extracurriculars, work schedule, or family obligations. Sites that offer 24/7 tutoring can give you the extra help you need if you can’t access the free resources that are available at your school. 

#3: Variety

Not everyone learns the same way. Maybe you’re more of a visual learner, but your teacher mostly does lectures. Or maybe you learn best by listening and taking notes, but you’re expected to learn something just from reading the textbook . 

One of the best things about online homework help is that it comes in a variety of forms. The best homework help sites offer resources for all types of learners, including videos, practice activities, and even one-on-one discussions with real-life experts. 

This variety can also be a good thing if you just don’t really resonate with the way a concept is being explained (looking at you, math textbooks!).

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Not so fast. There are cons to homework help websites, too. Get to know them below!

3 Cons of Using Homework Help Websites 

Now, let’s take a look at the drawbacks of online homework help. 

#1: Unreliable Info

This can be a real problem. In addition to all the really good homework help sites, there are a whole lot of disreputable or unreliable sites out there. The fact of the matter is that some homework help sites don’t necessarily hire people who are experts in the subjects they’re talking about. In those cases, you may not be getting the accurate, up-to-date, and thorough information you need.

Additionally, even the great sites may not be able to answer all of your homework questions. This is especially true if the site uses an algorithm or chatbot to help students…or if you’re enrolled in an advanced or college-level course. In these cases, working with your teacher or school-provided tutors are probably your best option. 

#2: No Clarification

This depends on the service you use, of course. But the majority of them provide free or low-cost help through pre-recorded videos. Watching videos or reading info online can definitely help you with your homework… but you can’t ask questions or get immediate feedback if you need it .

#3: Potential For Scamming 

Like we mentioned earlier, there are a lot of homework help websites out there, and lots of them are scams. The review comments we read covered everything from outdated or wrong information, to misleading claims about the help provided, to not allowing people to cancel their service after signing up. 

No matter which site you choose to use, make sure you research and read reviews before you sign up–especially if it’s a paid service! 

body-cheat-cheating-cc0

When Does “Help” Become “Cheating”?

Admittedly, whether using homework help websites constitutes cheating is a bit of a grey area. For instance, is it “help” when a friend reads your essay for history class and corrects your grammar, or is it “cheating”? The truth is, not everyone agrees on when “help” crosses the line into “cheating .” When in doubt, it can be a good idea to check with your teacher to see what they think about a particular type of help you want to get. 

That said, a general rule of thumb to keep in mind is to make sure that the assignment you turn in for credit is authentically yours . It needs to demonstrate your own thoughts and your own current abilities. Remember: the point of every homework assignment is to 1) help you learn something, and 2) show what you’ve learned. 

So if a service answers questions or writes essays for you, there’s a good chance using it constitutes cheating. 

Here’s an example that might help clarify the difference for you. Brainstorming essay ideas with others or looking online for inspiration is “help” as long as you write the essay yourself. Having someone read it and give you feedback about what you need to change is also help, provided you’re the one that makes the changes later. 

But copying all or part of an essay you find online or having someone write (or rewrite) the whole thing for you would be “cheating.” The same is true for other subjects. Ultimately, if you’re not generating your own work or your own answers, it’s probably cheating.

body-info-tip

5 Tips for Finding the Best Homework Help Websites for You

Now that you know some of our favorite homework help websites, free and paid, you can start doing some additional research on your own to decide which services might work best for you! Here are some top tips for choosing a homework help website. 

Tip 1: Decide How You Learn Best 

Before you decide which site or sites you’re going to use for homework help, y ou should figure out what kind of learning style works for you the most. Are you a visual learner? Then choose a site that uses lots of videos to help explain concepts. If you know you learn best by actually doing tasks, choose a site that provides lots of practice exercises.

Tip 2: Determine Which Subjects You Need Help With

Just because a homework help site is good overall doesn’t mean that it’s equally good for every subject. If you only need help in math, choose a site that specializes in that area. But if history is where you’re struggling, a site that specializes in math won’t be much help. So make sure to choose a site that you know provides high-quality help in the areas you need it most. 

Tip 3: Decide How Much One-On-One Help You Need 

This is really about cost-effectiveness. If you learn well on your own by reading and watching videos, a free site like Khan Academy is a good choice. But if you need actual tutoring, or to be able to ask questions and get personalized answers from experts, a paid site that provides that kind of service may be a better option.

Tip 4: Set a Budget 

If you decide you want to go with a paid homework help website, set a budget first . The prices for sites vary wildly, and the cost to use them can add up quick. 

Tip 5: Read the Reviews

Finally, it’s always a good idea to read actual reviews written by the people using these homework sites. You’ll learn the good, the bad, and the ugly of what the users’ experiences have been. This is especially true if you intend to subscribe to a paid service. You’ll want to make sure that users think it’s worth the price overall!

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What’s Next?

If you want to get good grades on your homework, it’s a good idea to learn how to tackle it strategically. Our expert tips will help you get the most out of each assignment…and boost your grades in the process. 

Doing well on homework assignments is just one part of getting good grades. We’ll teach you everything you need to know about getting great grades in high school in this article. 

Of course, test grades can make or break your GPA, too. Here are 17 expert tips that’ll help you get the most out of your study prep before you take an exam. 

Need more help? Check out Tutorbase!

Our vetted tutor database includes a range of experienced educators who can help you polish an essay for English or explain how derivatives work for Calculus. You can use dozens of filters and search criteria to find the perfect person for your needs.

Connect With a Tutor Now

Ashley Sufflé Robinson has a Ph.D. in 19th Century English Literature. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

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What’s the Right Amount of Homework?

Decades of research show that homework has some benefits, especially for students in middle and high school—but there are risks to assigning too much.

Many teachers and parents believe that homework helps students build study skills and review concepts learned in class. Others see homework as disruptive and unnecessary, leading to burnout and turning kids off to school. Decades of research show that the issue is more nuanced and complex than most people think: Homework is beneficial, but only to a degree. Students in high school gain the most, while younger kids benefit much less.

The National PTA and the National Education Association support the “ 10-minute homework guideline ”—a nightly 10 minutes of homework per grade level. But many teachers and parents are quick to point out that what matters is the quality of the homework assigned and how well it meets students’ needs, not the amount of time spent on it.

The guideline doesn’t account for students who may need to spend more—or less—time on assignments. In class, teachers can make adjustments to support struggling students, but at home, an assignment that takes one student 30 minutes to complete may take another twice as much time—often for reasons beyond their control. And homework can widen the achievement gap, putting students from low-income households and students with learning disabilities at a disadvantage.

However, the 10-minute guideline is useful in setting a limit: When kids spend too much time on homework, there are real consequences to consider.

Small Benefits for Elementary Students

As young children begin school, the focus should be on cultivating a love of learning, and assigning too much homework can undermine that goal. And young students often don’t have the study skills to benefit fully from homework, so it may be a poor use of time (Cooper, 1989 ; Cooper et al., 2006 ; Marzano & Pickering, 2007 ). A more effective activity may be nightly reading, especially if parents are involved. The benefits of reading are clear: If students aren’t proficient readers by the end of third grade, they’re less likely to succeed academically and graduate from high school (Fiester, 2013 ).

For second-grade teacher Jacqueline Fiorentino, the minor benefits of homework did not outweigh the potential drawback of turning young children against school at an early age, so she experimented with dropping mandatory homework. “Something surprising happened: They started doing more work at home,” Fiorentino writes . “This inspiring group of 8-year-olds used their newfound free time to explore subjects and topics of interest to them.” She encouraged her students to read at home and offered optional homework to extend classroom lessons and help them review material.

Moderate Benefits for Middle School Students

As students mature and develop the study skills necessary to delve deeply into a topic—and to retain what they learn—they also benefit more from homework. Nightly assignments can help prepare them for scholarly work, and research shows that homework can have moderate benefits for middle school students (Cooper et al., 2006 ). Recent research also shows that online math homework, which can be designed to adapt to students’ levels of understanding, can significantly boost test scores (Roschelle et al., 2016 ).

There are risks to assigning too much, however: A 2015 study found that when middle school students were assigned more than 90 to 100 minutes of daily homework, their math and science test scores began to decline (Fernández-Alonso, Suárez-Álvarez, & Muñiz, 2015 ). Crossing that upper limit can drain student motivation and focus. The researchers recommend that “homework should present a certain level of challenge or difficulty, without being so challenging that it discourages effort.” Teachers should avoid low-effort, repetitive assignments, and assign homework “with the aim of instilling work habits and promoting autonomous, self-directed learning.”

In other words, it’s the quality of homework that matters, not the quantity. Brian Sztabnik, a veteran middle and high school English teacher, suggests that teachers take a step back and ask themselves these five questions :

  • How long will it take to complete?
  • Have all learners been considered?
  • Will an assignment encourage future success?
  • Will an assignment place material in a context the classroom cannot?
  • Does an assignment offer support when a teacher is not there?

More Benefits for High School Students, but Risks as Well

By the time they reach high school, students should be well on their way to becoming independent learners, so homework does provide a boost to learning at this age, as long as it isn’t overwhelming (Cooper et al., 2006 ; Marzano & Pickering, 2007 ). When students spend too much time on homework—more than two hours each night—it takes up valuable time to rest and spend time with family and friends. A 2013 study found that high school students can experience serious mental and physical health problems, from higher stress levels to sleep deprivation, when assigned too much homework (Galloway, Conner, & Pope, 2013 ).

Homework in high school should always relate to the lesson and be doable without any assistance, and feedback should be clear and explicit.

Teachers should also keep in mind that not all students have equal opportunities to finish their homework at home, so incomplete homework may not be a true reflection of their learning—it may be more a result of issues they face outside of school. They may be hindered by issues such as lack of a quiet space at home, resources such as a computer or broadband connectivity, or parental support (OECD, 2014 ). In such cases, giving low homework scores may be unfair.

Since the quantities of time discussed here are totals, teachers in middle and high school should be aware of how much homework other teachers are assigning. It may seem reasonable to assign 30 minutes of daily homework, but across six subjects, that’s three hours—far above a reasonable amount even for a high school senior. Psychologist Maurice Elias sees this as a common mistake: Individual teachers create homework policies that in aggregate can overwhelm students. He suggests that teachers work together to develop a school-wide homework policy and make it a key topic of back-to-school night and the first parent-teacher conferences of the school year.

Parents Play a Key Role

Homework can be a powerful tool to help parents become more involved in their child’s learning (Walker et al., 2004 ). It can provide insights into a child’s strengths and interests, and can also encourage conversations about a child’s life at school. If a parent has positive attitudes toward homework, their children are more likely to share those same values, promoting academic success.

But it’s also possible for parents to be overbearing, putting too much emphasis on test scores or grades, which can be disruptive for children (Madjar, Shklar, & Moshe, 2015 ). Parents should avoid being overly intrusive or controlling—students report feeling less motivated to learn when they don’t have enough space and autonomy to do their homework (Orkin, May, & Wolf, 2017 ; Patall, Cooper, & Robinson, 2008 ; Silinskas & Kikas, 2017 ). So while homework can encourage parents to be more involved with their kids, it’s important to not make it a source of conflict.

7 Apps That Can Do Your Homework Much Faster Than You

7 Apps That Will Do Your Homework For You

In the field of educational technology, some apps might be getting too smart.

More and more apps are delivering on-demand homework help to students, who can easily re-purpose the learning tools to obtain not just assistance, but also answers. Whether or not that’s cheating—and how to stop it—is one of the concerns surrounding a new app that can solve math equations with the snap of a camera . While the software has inspired teachers to create real-world homework problems that can’t be automatically solved , that strategy doesn’t hold up to other apps that tap into real-life brains for solutions.

Here’s a look at 7 apps that can do your homework for you, and what they have to say about cheating:

Price : Free Availability : iOS, Android app coming in early 2015

The new, seemingly magic app allows users to take pictures of typed equations, and then outputs a step-by-step solution. As of Wednesday, the app is the number one free app on the App Store. But the biggest issue, one teacher argues , isn’t if students will use the app to cheat, because many will. Rather, it’s about how teachers will adapt. A PhotoMath spokeswoman said educators have welcomed the app with positive reviews, but the software remains “quite controversial.”

“We didn’t develop PhotoMath as a cheating tool. We really wanted kids to learn,” said Tijana Zganec, a sales and marketing associate at tech company MicroBlink, which created PhotoMath. “If you want to cheat, you will find a way to cheat. But if you want to learn, you can use PhotoMath for that.”

Whether you’re a high schooler with eight periods of classes or a college student tackling dozens of credits, there’s one thing you’ve got for sure: a mess of assignments. iHomework can help you keep track of all your work, slicing and dicing it in a variety of ways. Sorting it by due date, week, month, or by course, the app is more organized than a Trapper Keeper. And in integrating data from Questia, you can link your reading material to your assignments so you don’t have to dig through a pile of papers to find the right information.

A scheduling feature can help you keep track of those random bi-weekly Thursday labs, and you can even mark the location of your courses on a map so you don’t end up on the wrong side of campus. And finally, with iCloud syncing, you can access all this information on whatever Apple-compatible device you’re using at the moment — no need to dig for your iPad.

Google Apps for Education

Taking the search giant’s suite of free browser-based apps and sandboxing them so they are safe for school use, Google Apps for Education is an excellent alternative to the mainstream installable productivity software, but this one has a perk that almost school board will love—it’s free. Packaging together favorites like Gmail, Hangouts, Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Google Drive with Classroom, a digital hub for organizing assignments and sending feedback, the goal of this collection is to make learning a more collaborative process.

Though Google Apps for Education is cloud-hosted, the programs can be used offline, ideal for when your student needs to escape the internet and work distraction-free. And since it works on any device, it also helps students avoid buying overly expensive hardware. That means more money for extracurricular activities.

Price: Free, but some homework services require payment Availability: iOS and Android

HwPic is a tutoring service that allows students to take send pictures of their homework to tutors, who will then respond within minutes to your questions with a step-by-step solution. There’s even an option to expedite the answers if a student is in a hurry. HwPic Co-Founder Tiklat Issa said that the app was initially rejected by Apple’s App Store, which believed it would promote cheating, but he successfully argued that just because someone uses the app in a way that it’s not meant to be used doesn’t mean the app should be punished.

Issa added that HwPic prohibits cheating in its terms and conditions. Tutors don’t solve homework that has words like “Quiz” or “Exam,” and they often know if a student is sending a photo during a test if they’ve paid for expedited answers, and if the photo is dim, blurry and taken under a desk. “We’ve minimized cheating,” said Issa. “We haven’t eliminated it. That’s kind of unrealistic.”

Wolfram Alpha

Price : $2.99 Availability : iOS and Android

Wolfram Alpha is similar to PhotoMath, only that it targets older students studying high levels of math and doesn’t support photos. The service also outputs step-by-step solutions to topics as advanced as vector calculus and differential equations, making it a popular tool for college students.

“It’s cheating not doing computer-based math, because we’re cheating students out of real conceptual understanding and an ability to drive much further forward in the math they can do, to cover much more conceptual ground. And in turn, that’s cheating our economies,” said Conrad Wolfram, Wolfram Research’s Director of Strategic Development, in a TEDx Talk . “People talk about the knowledge economy. I think we’re moving forward to what we’re calling the computational knowledge economy.”

Homework Helper

Price: Free Availability: iOS and Android

Chinese Internet search company Baidu launched an app called Homework Helper this year with which students can crowdsource help or answers to homework. Users post a picture or type their homework questions onto online forums, and those who answer the questions can win e-coins that can be used to buy electronics like iPhones and laptops.

The app has logged 5 million downloads, much to the dismay of many some parents who argue that the students spend less time thinking about challenging problems. A Homework Helper staffer admitted to Quartz , “I think this is a kind of cheating.”

Price: Free, but some homework services require payment Availability: iOS

Slader is a crowdsourcing app for high school and college students to post and answer questions in math and science. While students can post original homework for help, many questions in popular textbooks have already been answered on the app, according to Fast Company . An Illinois high school said earlier this year that it suspected students were using the service to cheat on their math homework.

Slader argues that it’s “challenging traditional ideas about math and education,” and said that the ideas behind its app “aren’t a write-off to teachers,” according to its blog . Slader told San Francisco media outlet KQED that it shouldn’t be dismissed as a cheating tool, but rather considered a way for students to access real-time help.

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Homework Hacks: 8 Tips to Get It Done Faster

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Homework is no fun, especially if you’ve got a full schedule. You only have a little bit of time and a little bit of energy. And it takes so long to get through it.

Not anymore. We’ve got some helpful homework hacks for you that will make doing your homework faster and less painful.

1. Plan Your Homework and Make a List

When you start your homework, you’ll probably jump right into the first thing on your mind or the first thing you pull out of your backpack, then work your way through the rest of your assignments. There’s a better way.

Figure out how much time you have to do homework, then list out all the different tasks that you have to do. Estimate how long it will take to complete each assignment to see if you need to allow yourself more time. Be realistic. Once your list is complete you can work straight through instead of stopping frequently to figure out what to do next. It will also be extremely gratifying to cross things off after each assignment you finish!

2. Get Out All the Books and Supplies You Need

While you’re working, you discover you need a calculator, you need a certain book, you need a new pencil, you ran out of paper… the list can go on.

Since you’ve now identified all your assignments, figure out everything you need to get each item done and bring it to your workspace so it’s there when you need it.

3. Find a Quiet Place to Work Without Distractions

Speaking of workspace, you probably prefer doing your homework in front of the TV, but that can actually be the biggest distraction of all. Sitting in front of the TV is probably slowing you down, making homework time seem much longer that it actually is.

Find a place that’s quiet, with as few distractions and clutter possible. Remember, the faster you get it done, the faster you can get back to fully enjoying Netflix.

4. Turn Off Your Phone

We know this is probably the last thing you want to hear. How can you live without your phone? But for a couple hours, its totally worth it. Every time you get a notification and check your phone, it breaks your focus. It then takes more brain power to get back on track to what you were working on.

5. Listen to Classical Music While Working

We know what you’re thinking… Classical music? Seriously?

However, classical music is great for background audio. There aren’t any lyrics or beats to distract your focus. And research has shown that students who listen to classical music score higher on tests than students who listen to other genres of music. So find some good classical playlist on Spotify, then celebrate with Queen Bey when you’re done.

6. Eat Snacks and Drink Water

At the end of a long day, you may be mentally and physically tired. If you go straight into homework it may take you a long time to finish and it won’t be your best work.

Having some light healthy snacks and drinking plenty of water helps revitalize your brain and body. Avoid soda, energy drinks, or sugary snacks that will only make you crash before you’re done.

7. Take Short Breaks in Between Homework Tasks

If you have a lot to do, you may feel the pressure to just work straight through hours and hours of homework. But this will likely end up slowing you down, prolonging the entire session.

Do your work in short sprints. Go hard at a task, then take a quick break to stretch and walk around. It’ll re-energize your mind and body to keep going. For starters, try working for 25 minutes, then taking a 5-minute break.

8. Reward Yourself After You’re Finished

Homework isn’t always fun. But negativity can slow you down.

Our brains work off of reward systems. If you give yourself a reward when finishing your homework, it makes it a lot easier to start your homework the next time and you’ll get through it faster. Rewards could be being able to watch a show, eat ice cream, play a game, or going out and doing something fun.

Now that you’ve got all these tips, go get your homework done faster than ever before. It may be hard at first, but keep using these tips and it’ll get easier as you go.

Featured Image: Piotr Marcinski/Shutterstock

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ZDNET's editorial team writes on behalf of you, our reader. Our goal is to deliver the most accurate information and the most knowledgeable advice possible in order to help you make smarter buying decisions on tech gear and a wide array of products and services. Our editors thoroughly review and fact-check every article to ensure that our content meets the highest standards. If we have made an error or published misleading information, we will correct or clarify the article. If you see inaccuracies in our content, please report the mistake via this form .

What is a VPN and why do you need one? All your virtual private network questions answered

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Whether you work from a traditional office, home office, your iPhone , or on the road, a VPN is one of the best ways to protect yourself from data breaches on the internet, especially when using public Wi-Fi networks. 

Also:  The best VPN services of 2024: Expert tested and reviewed

But how effective are VPNs, and what's the best VPN for you? What are the downsides to using a VPN? Our VPN guide will answer all your VPN-related questions -- including a few you probably haven't thought to ask.

What is a VPN?

VPN is an acronym for Virtual Private Network. 

The purpose  of a VPN  is to provide you with security and privacy as you communicate over the internet.

Here's the problem with the internet: it's inherently insecure. When the internet was first designed, the priority was to be able to send packets (chunks of data) as reliably as possible. Networking across the country and the world was relatively new, and nodes often went down. Most of the internet's core protocols (communication methods) were designed to route around failure rather than secure data.

Also: The best mobile VPNs of 2024

The applications you're accustomed to using, such as email, web, messaging, and Facebook, are all built on top of that  Internet Protocol  (IP) core. While some standards have developed, not all internet apps are secure. Many still send their information without any security or privacy protection whatsoever.

This leaves any internet user vulnerable to criminals who might steal your banking or credit card information, governments who might want to eavesdrop on their citizens, and other internet users who might want to spy on you for a whole range of nefarious reasons.

A VPN creates a private tunnel over the open internet. The idea is that everything you send is encapsulated in this private communications channel and encrypted so -- even if your packets are intercepted -- they can't be deciphered.  VPNs are powerful and important tools to protect yourself and your data , but they have limitations.

How does a VPN work?

Let's start with the basic idea of internet communication. Suppose you're at your desk and you want to access a website like ZDNET. To do this, your computer initiates a request by sending some packets. If you're in an office, those packets often travel through switches and routers on your LAN before they are transferred to the public internet through a router.

Once on the public internet, those packets travel through a bunch of computers. A separate request is made to a series of name servers to translate the DNS name ZDNET.com to an IP address. That information is sent back to your browser, which then sends the request again through many computers on the public internet. Eventually, it reaches the ZDNET infrastructure, which also routes those packets, grabs a web page (which is a bunch of separate elements), and sends all that back to you.

Also: The best VPN for streaming in 2024

Each internet request usually results in a whole series of communication events between multiple points. The way a VPN works is by encrypting those packets at the originating point, often hiding the data and the information about your originating IP address. The VPN software on your end then sends those packets to the VPN server at some destination point, decrypting that information.

One of the most important issues in understanding the limits of VPNs is understanding where the endpoint of the VPN server resides. We'll talk about that next.

What are the two main types of VPNs?

Most of us are familiar with the concept of a LAN, a local area network. That's the private network inside one physical location -- be it a home, a corporate building, or a campus. But many businesses don't run out of one location. They have branch offices, departments, and divisions that are geographically dispersed.

In many cases, each of these offices also has LANs. But how do the LANs connect? For some very specialized solutions, companies lease private lines to connect the offices. That can be very expensive. Instead, most companies opt to connect separated private LANs over the public internet geographically. To protect their data, they set up VPNs between offices, encrypting the data as it traverses the public internet.

Also: How to check if your VPN is working (and what to do if your VPN won't connect)

This is a corporate or enterprise VPN, and it's characterized by the same organization controlling both endpoints of the VPN. If your company controls the originating point (say a sales office) and the endpoint (like a VPN server at your corporate HQ), you can be assured ( unless there's a bug ) that your data is securely transmitted.

The second type of VPN is a consumer VPN. This is for those of you who compute in hotels or at coffee shops and connect to web applications like social networks, email, banks, or shopping sites. Consumer VPN services help ensure that those communications are protected.

What does a consumer VPN service do?

A consumer VPN service is, fundamentally, a  software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering . The VPN service provides a secure tunnel between your computing device (whether laptop, phone, or tablet) and the provider's data center.

This feature is important to understand. Consumer VPN services protect your transmission from your location to their location, not from your location to the destination application you're using. If you think about it, this approach makes sense -- a consumer VPN service is operated by a completely different company than, for example, Facebook or your bank.

Also: The best VPN services for iPhone and iPad in 2024

The VPN service gives you an app that you run on your local device, which encrypts your data, and it travels in its encrypted form through a tunnel to the VPN service provider's infrastructure. At that point, the data is decrypted and sent on its way.

Two things happen here. First, if you're using an https connection, your data is encrypted by your browser and then by your VPN app. Your data is decrypted only once at the VPN data center, leaving the original encryption provided by the browser intact. That encrypted data then goes on to the destination application, such as your bank.

The second thing that happens is that the web application you're talking to does not get to see your IP address. Instead, it sees an IP address owned by the VPN service. This approach allows you some level of anonymous networking. This IP spoofing is also used to trick applications into thinking you're located in a different region or even a different country than you are located in. There are reasons (both illegal and legal) to do this. We'll discuss that in a bit.

When should I use a VPN?

We've already discussed the use of a VPN when connecting offices. Any time you have two LANs that need to link over the public internet, you should consider using VPN technology or an equivalent method of enterprise protection. In this case, the VPN software will probably run in a router, a server, or a dedicated VPN server hardware appliance.

We talked about two use cases above for consumer VPN services: protecting your data and spoofing your location. We'll talk more about location spoofing later, so let's focus on data protection for now.

Also: The best travel VPNs of 2024

When you're away from home or the office, and you connect to the internet, you'll most often be doing so via Wi-Fi provided by your hotel or the restaurant, library, or coffee shop you're working out of at that moment. Sometimes, Wi-Fi has a password. Other times, it will be completely open. In either case, you have no idea who else is accessing that network. Therefore, you have no idea who might be snooping on your internet traffic, browsing history, or online activity.

I recommend always using a VPN when using someone else's Wi-Fi network. Here's a good rule of thumb: if you're away from the office or home, and you're using someone else's Wi-Fi (even that of a family member or a friend, because you never know if they've been compromised), use a VPN. It's particularly important if you're accessing a service that has personally identifying information. Remember, a lot goes on behind the scenes, and you never really know if one or more of your apps are authenticating in the background and putting your information at risk.

Another reason you might choose to use a VPN is if you have something to hide, which isn't just about folks doing things they shouldn't do. Sometimes people really need to hide information. Take, for example, the person who is worried an employer might discriminate against them because of their sexual orientation or medical condition. Another example is a person who needs to go online, but is concerned about revealing location information to a person in their life who might be a threat.

And then, of course, there are those people in restrictive countries who need to hide their activity merely to gain access to the internet without potentially grave penalties.

Are the free VPN services any good?

There are some good  free VPN services , but  I avoid all free VPNs .

Why? It costs a lot to provide the infrastructure to operate a VPN service, from the network pipes to the servers. That infrastructure has to be paid for somehow. If user fees do not pay for it, advertising, data gathering, or some nastier reason are likely taking up the slack.

Here's another reason not to use a free service, and this one is a lot scarier.  Malware providers and criminal organizations have set up free VPN services  that not only don't protect you but actively harvest personal data, and either use it or sell it to the highest bidder. Instead of being protected, you're being plundered.

What's the best way to choose a VPN service?

To be fair, not all paid VPN services are legitimate, either. It's important to be careful about which you choose. We've put together  an always up-to-date directory  of quality VPN providers. Some are better than others (and that's reflected in their ratings), but all are legitimate companies that provide quality service.

Also: 3 security gadgets I never leave home without

Beyond our directory, it's always good practice to Google a company or product name and read the user reviews. If you see a huge number of old complaints or new complaints suddenly start showing up, it might be that there's been a change of management or policies. When I'm looking for a service, I always base my decision partially on professional reviews and partially based on the tone of user reviews.

Finally, be sure to choose a service with the capabilities  that meet your needs . You may need one or more features only provided by certain services. So, think through your needs as you make a decision.

Can a VPN guarantee my privacy?

Oh,  heck no . A VPN can help ensure you're not snooped on when connecting between your computer and a website. But the website itself is quite capable of some serious privacy violations. For example, a VPN can't protect you against a website setting a tracking cookie that will tell other websites about you. A VPN can't protect you against a website recording information about products you're interested in. A VPN can't protect you against a website that sells your email address to list brokers. Yada, yada, yada.

Also: The best VPN deals right now

A  VPN does help protect you  in the situations we've discussed in previous sections. But don't expect a VPN to be a magical privacy shield that will keep everything you do private and confidential. There are many, many ways your privacy can be compromised, and a  VPN will be of only partial help .

Will VPN software slow down my computer?

That would be a definite maybe. Back in the day, the process of encrypting and decrypting packets would take a toll on CPU performance. Most current CPUs are now fast enough that most crypto algorithms can run without much of an impact on processor performance.

Also: The best cheap VPNs of 2024

However, network performance is another thing entirely. First, keep in mind that if you're using a VPN, you're probably using it at a public location. That public Wi-Fi service is likely to range in performance somewhere between "meh" and unusable. So, just the fact that you're remotely working on a mediocre network will reduce performance. But then, if you connect to a VPN in a different country, the connection between countries is also likely to degrade network performance. Server locations matter.

My rule of thumb is to use a domestic VPN and connect to servers as close to my location as possible. That said, I have had good nights and bad nights getting online. On a recent trip, I found most hotel networks become unusable after about 9pm. My theory is that many of the guests are watching Netflix at that time, completely clogging the hotels' pipes.

Do VPN service providers limit usage and how?

Some do. Some don't.  Look at that directory I mentioned earlier  because that's one of the factors where a service might lose some points.

Some VPN services will limit the total amount of data you can send and receive, either in one connection session or over a month. Other VPN services will limit the speed of the data, effectively sharing less of their pipe with you than might be optimal. That could slow your browsing experience to a crawl or completely prevent you from watching videos through streaming services.

Also:  Five easy steps to keep your smartphone safe from hackers

Usually, it's the free services that throttle your usage in these ways. Some paid services will offer a trial, where you can transmit up to a certain data cap before being asked to sign up as a paying customer. That's actually pretty cool because it gives you a chance to try out the performance of their service before paying, but it also gives the vendor a chance to make money necessary to operate the service.

Many VPN services claim that they'll provide you with unlimited data transmission if you pay their fee and won't throttle your speeds. Generally, this is true, but I'll give you my standard "unlimited bandwidth" warning: it's been my experience that when a vendor says something is "unlimited," it's almost always limited. Somewhere, there will be a note in the fine print or terms of service that allows the vendor to limit you in some way. It pays to read those agreements.

How private are VPNs? Do they log everything I do?

In our  VPN directory , we tracked two types of logging. The first is whether providers log traffic, DNS requests, and IP addresses. This is pretty nasty stuff. If a VPN service logs this, they would have the information you might choose to hide, like sites you visit, locations where you are, and possibly even information you might be sending.

Also: 7 hacking tools that look harmless but can do real damage

Although the use of these services will still protect you from Wi-Fi spies in your hotel or restaurant, I can't recommend signing up for any service that does DNS, traffic, or IP logging. There are better, more private options.

The second type of logging is more benign. VPN services that log bandwidth usage and connection timestamp data usually do so either to tune their own systems or manage any abuse of their services.

I have less of a concern with services that just monitor bandwidth usage, as long as they don't store any specifics. That said, we gave top marks to those services that don't do any logging. When I choose a VPN service, those are the services I pick for my use.

Is it legal to use a VPN?

That depends. VPN use is legal in most countries, but, according to  VPN provider CyberGhost , VPN use is illegal in the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, China, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia,  and Russia . Vladimir Putin has recently banned VPN use in Russia. Also, be aware that the so-called  proxy server alternative to VPNs  is also illegal in many countries, which consider any form of IP spoofing to be illegal, not just those services labeled as VPN.

Also:  The best security keys you can buy

Restrictions vary, as do penalties.  China allows certain approved VPNs . In the  UAE, if you use a VPN, you could go to jail or be fined a minimum of more than the equivalent of $100,000.

Definitely research these laws before you visit a country. Many travelers mistakenly believe that just because they're not citizens, and all they're doing is linking back to a corporate system, they should be able to have unrestricted use of VPN software. This is a mistake.

The bottom line is to check the laws of the country you're in before connecting. It's also a good idea to check with your VPN provider, both for insight into whether it knows if there are issues, and whether it'll support connectivity from the country you're visiting.

Do I need to use a VPN if my hotel has a wired internet connection?

Yes. It is almost totally unlikely that each room is on a dedicated subnet, so that means packets are traveling across a network shared by other guests. In addition, you never know whether someone in the front office has set up a packet sniffer for the express purpose of mining guest information.

So, yes, use a VPN, even if there's a hard-wired connection to the wall.

Will a VPN service help me connect securely to my office network?

If you're trying to connect to your on-premises corporate network, you'll most likely be assigned a VPN application by your IT department. This will allow you to establish a point-to-point connection between your local device and a server owned and operated by your company.

Also:  6 simple cybersecurity rules to live by  

But, if your company is cloud-based, and you're connecting to SaaS applications like Salesforce or Google, you should probably use a VPN service since you're not actually connecting to your company but instead to a public cloud application.

If your IT department does not specifically identify a VPN service you should use for accessing their public cloud applications, definitely look at our  VPN directory  and choose one of the higher-rated service providers.

Can I get away with a VPN app, or do I need to bring my own router/bridge/dongle?

Let's talk about what happens when you use a VPN app on your computer or mobile device. Any VPN app will require an existing network connection to be able to connect to the VPN service provider. This approach means that even if you set your VPN app to automatically launch when your device boots, there will be a period when your computer is connected to the internet directly, not through your VPN.

Also:  9 top mobile security threats and how you can avoid them

Some background services can send information across that initial, unsecured connection before the VPN loads. To be fair, the risk is relatively minor for most usage profiles. If you're establishing a connection automatically to your corporate server, you will want to check with your IT team about how they want you to set things up.

If you are interested in an added level of protection, there are intriguing gadgets called  Tiny Hardware Firewalls . These devices range from about $30 to $70 and connect via a network port or a USB slot to your laptop. They make the initial network connection, so your computer's communication is always blocked before it calls out to the internet.

Should I use a VPN on my phone or tablet?

Both Android and iOS come with basic VPN capabilities to allow you to connect to your corporate networks securely. Your IT organization will generally advise you when you should use this feature, but as we've discussed, when away from your home or office, and especially if you're using an open, public Wi-Fi connection, you should.

If you're connecting to web applications, like email or Facebook, you should consider using a VPN service -- particularly if you're connecting via an open Wi-Fi network. Most good VPN services offer both iOS and Android clients.

Do I need a VPN if I'm connecting my phone via LTE?

That depends. Once again, your corporate IT department will let you know their policy for connection directly to their corporate network. Usually, you'll use the VPN client built into your device's operating system for that purpose.

However, the connection also depends on how much you trust your carrier, where you're located in the world, and how secure you want to be. The carriers (net neutrality notwithstanding) can generally be relied upon to provide a secure connection from your phone to their network in the US.

That said, it is possible to compromise wireless phone services with a  man-in-the-middle attack . This situation occurs when a malevolent actor places a device designed to confuse your phone, and cause your phone to connect to what it thinks is the phone network, but is, in fact, a device designed for spying.

Outside the US, the requirement for a VPN depends on what country you're in. If you are really concerned about security, simply avoid bringing any devices into a foreign nation that you intend to use after your trip. Those devices can be compromised in the country or during customs inspections.

Likewise, if you're connecting via a nation's local carrier, that carrier may be intercepting your traffic, particularly if you're a non-native of that nation. In that situation, if you must connect back to applications and services at home, using a VPN is quite literally the least you can do. Also, keep in mind that if you use your phone's hotspot to connect your computer to the internet, you'll want to use a VPN on your computer as well.

Finally, as we covered earlier in this guide, it's worth reminding you that some countries consider VPN use illegal. If you're planning on traveling, be sure to research local laws exhaustively.

What happens if a VPN connection fails while I'm on a remote connection?

A lot depends on what VPN you're using, how it's set up, and where you're connecting. That said, let's look at the most likely scenario.

Recall that when you're online and connected to an internet application through a VPN, a few things are happening. Your data from your computer to the VPN service is encrypted by the VPN. Your data from the VPN service to the internet application may or may not be encrypted via https, but the VPN service does not encrypt it. And your IP address is spoofed. The online application sees the IP address of the VPN service, not of your laptop.

Also:  How to find and remove spyware from your phone

When a VPN connection drops, you might just lose your connection. But because the internet is very good at routing around failures, what is more likely to happen is your computer will reconnect to the internet application, simply bypassing the VPN service. That means that -- on failure -- your local IP address may "leak out" and be logged by the internet application, and your data may be open to local Wi-Fi hackers at your hotel or wherever you're doing your computing.

There is a reasonably robust solution to that problem, and that's next.

What does a VPN kill switch do?

Put simply, a VPN kill switch kills your internet connection if it detects that your VPN's connection has failed. There are generally two types of VPN kill switches.

The first runs in the VPN client app on your computer, so if the VPN connection fails while the VPN client app is running, that VPN client app can turn off the computer or mobile device's internet connection. However, if your VPN connection has failed because the VPN client app itself crashed, then the kill switch may not work, and your IP and data may leak onto the internet.

Also: 8 habits of highly secure remote workers

The second type of VPN kill switch is at the operating system level. These switches are usually driver-level systems that run whether or not the VPN application is running. As such, they provide a bit more protection for your surfing activities.

Given that so many  VPN products we reviewed in our directory  support a kill switch, we recommend choosing a client with this feature. There may be a slight annoyance if you lose your connection, but that's more than made up for in the added security.

What do all those protocol names mean and which one should I choose?

If you've been shopping for a VPN service, you've undoubtedly come across a bunch of names like SSL, OpenVPN, SSTP, L2TP/IPSec, PPP, PPTP, IKEv2/IPSec, SOCKS5, and more. These are all communication protocols. They are, essentially, the name of the method by which your communication is encrypted and packaged for tunneling to the VPN provider.

Also:   How to stay safe on public Wi-Fi: 5 tips you need to know

There is a lot of debate  among security purists  about which VPN protocol is better. Some protocols (like PPP and its tunneling variant, PPTP) are old and compromised. Others, like SSTP, are proprietary to one company or another.

My recommendation -- and the protocol I most often choose to use -- is OpenVPN. OpenVPN is a non-proprietary, open-source implementation of a VPN communication layer protocol. It's well-understood, well-regarded, generally quite secure, and robust. Also, it has the benefit of communicating over port 443, which is the standard port for https communication, which means almost all firewalls will allow OpenVPN traffic -- and most won't even be able to detect that a VPN is being used.

Yes, there are certainly other protocol choices, even some that might be more appropriate than OpenVPN in certain situations. But if that's the case, either you've already made that decision, or your IT organization has specified a specific protocol you should use. However, as a default, if you're not sure what to look for, look for OpenVPN.

What does it mean when a VPN service talks about simultaneous connections?

The term "simultaneous connections" generally refers to the number of devices that can be connected to the VPN service and that can talk to the internet at once. For example, when I was driving across the country and working in my hotel room at night, I often had both my MacBook Pro and iPad connected to the internet.

Also:   The best password managers to help you easily maintain all your logins

I used the MacBook Pro for writing, keeping the iPad open to do searches and find supporting information. Both of these were connected to the internet at one time. This was possible because the VPN service I was using allowed up to three connections to open at once.

This form of connectivity is also a good way to provide support for more than one family member on a single subscription. Generally, there's no good reason for a VPN provider to allow less than two or three connections. If your provider only allows one, find another vendor. We gave extra points in our  VPN directory  to those vendors who allowed three or more connections.

When should I choose either dynamic or static IP?

Every device connected to the public internet is assigned an IP address. It's like a phone number for each device. To be able to connect to the internet, each device needs such an address.

The term "dynamic IP address" means that when a device connects to the internet, it's given an IP address taken from a pool of available addresses. While it's possible to get the same IP address on multiple connections, generally, each time you connect, you'll get a different address.

Also: Why you'll need a VPN for the Vision Pro (and other XR headsets)

If you want to hide your address from the web applications you're connecting to, you'll want a VPN service that provides dynamic IP addresses. In our directory,  we list the number of IP addresses each service offers . By using a service with more available IP addresses, the chances of you getting a repeated IP are quite small.

There are some minor disadvantages to using a dynamic IP. If someone who previously had the IP address you've been assigned did something nefarious on a service you use, the IP address might be banned. Usually, VPN providers are cautious about checking their IP addresses against blacklists, so the chances of this being a problem for you are slim.

By contrast, a static IP address is an address that's assigned to you and only you. Most often, this is needed if you're running a server. Usually, static IP addresses are used in corporate situations and are generally not practical for general remote access, like from a hotel or coffee shop.

Unless you have a specific application that you know needs a static IP, you'll want to be assigned a new dynamic IP address for each VPN session you initiate.

What does it mean when a VPN service talks about server switching?

As we mentioned in the previous section, you're usually assigned a dynamic IP address from a pool of addresses when you connect to a VPN service. But where are those addresses located? They're attached to servers located, usually, throughout the world.

Most VPN services allow you to connect to server locations in many different countries. In our VPN directory,  we list both the number of servers the service maintains and the number of countries . By default, you'll usually be assigned a server located in your home country. Still, if you want to obfuscate your location, you may want to connect to a server located in a different country.

Also: The best VPN routers of 2024

Server switching is a feature -- offered by most VPN service providers -- that allows you to change what region or country you're going to connect to. Most providers allow you to switch as often as you'd like (although you usually have to disconnect, then change your configuration, and reconnect). This may be useful if you're trying to hide your location or if you're running into some communications glitches on the server you're currently using.

Can I use a VPN to spoof my location or country of origin?

Because the VPN server you're connected to presents  its IP address  to whatever web application you're using, by choosing a server located in a different country, you can represent your connection as if you're in a different country. This may be illegal in certain regions, so use caution when doing this. 

In my testing, some VPN providers could successfully hide their originating country or the fact that they were VPNs, but others could not. You'll probably want to do some testing. Of the services where I did testing,  NordVPN  and  Hotspot Shield  could successfully hide their VPN origins, while  StrongVPN  and  CyberGhost  could not.

Can I use a VPN to watch a blacked-out program or video?

Sometimes it is possible to watch a blacked-out sporting event or other show, although we certainly can't advise you to do so. Spoofing your location to bypass broadcast restrictions may get you in hot water.

Also: What is the dark web? Here's everything to know before you access it

Also, do be aware that some broadcasters have developed increasingly sophisticated methods to determine whether the IP address you represent is the IP address where you're located. The VPN may be able to protect your original IP address from being seen. Still, there are characteristics of proxy communications (like a slightly longer time to transfer packets) that can be used to identify users who are trying to bypass watching restrictions.

Is it true that a VPN is completely unhackable?

No. No. Did I mention... no.  Nothing is unhackable . As evidence...

In January 2018, Cisco Systems (a very highly respected maker of internet communications hardware)  revealed that a critical bug was found  in its ASA (Adaptive Security Appliance) software that could allow hackers to execute code remotely.

This is a bug in enterprise-level VPN systems used by corporations, so it's severe. Fortunately, responsible IT administrators can patch their systems to fix the bug. However, the incident goes to show how no system can be truly deemed absolutely secure.

Another example was a  bug in Hotspot Shield , a popular VPN service. This bug allowed a hacker to expose private information, including originating IP. Hotspot Shield issued an update, which gives us an excuse to remind you that you should always install updates, especially on your VPN client software.

Who are the key players?

We've done in-depth reviews of the following VPN services. If you're considering a VPN, you might want to read these articles first:

NordVPN review: Sincere about security and privacy

StrongVPN Review: A clear and easy-to-use VPN ideal for coffee shop use

Hotspot Shield review: Here's a VPN that actually lives up to its hype

CyberGhost VPN review: More than just VPN, an all-in-one security kit

IPVanish review: VPN delivers a wealth of options and browsing controls

While there are a tremendous number of VPN vendors out there, we think the following are some of the best:

  • NordVPN : 30-day refund, lots of simultaneous connections 
  • ExpressVPN : Detailed FAQ, good refund policy, Bitcoin
  • IPVanish VPN : Keeps no log files and has support for Kodi
  • PureVPN : Large network, strong technically, good performance 
  • Surfshark : Unlimited device support, whitelisting feature
  • Norton Secure VPN : Company is trustworthy and accountable
  • StrongVPN : Excellent infrastructure, decent price performance 
  • Private Internet Access : Lowest yearly price, most servers
  • CyberGhost : Supports Kodi, good Linux and router support

You can follow my day-to-day project updates on social media. Be sure to follow me on Twitter at @DavidGewirtz , on Facebook at Facebook.com/DavidGewirtz , on Instagram at Instagram.com/DavidGewirtz , and on YouTube at YouTube.com/DavidGewirtzTV .

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5 Ways to Work at Home Helping Kids With Homework

I f you are looking for a way to earn money remotely helping kids with homework, I have a list you will want to check out. There are several companies now that pay tutors and teachers to help their clients (kids, teens, and in some cases college students) with homework.

Offering homework help online in many cases is just side money, but it may appeal to you if you've ever done any tutoring or teaching or just happen to be academically gifted. And being able to offer the help online is a plus and far more convenient than having to travel to the home of a student, or to a school.

Below I've listed five companies that are almost always seeking people to provide homework help in a variety of different subjects, entirely online.

Good luck if you apply for anything!

5 Ways to Work at Home Offering Homework Help

1 – studypool.

After you apply as a tutor on the Studypool website, you can then browse the site for homework questions you think you'd be qualified to answer. You get to request a fee for the questions you're interested in helping with, and the students can decide whether or not they want to work with you based on what you are charging.

Once you submit your answer and the student accepts it, you will receive your pay.

You can log in on Studypool and work whenever you want, although there will be certain times of year that there aren't as many questions to help with (summer and the Christmas holidays).

2 – GeeklyHelp

GeeklyHelp specializes in homework help for college students. The students send out help requests and wait for a tutor “match” based on GeeklyHelp's AI algorithm designed to find the perfect tutor to help with their problem.

You will chat with the student you've been assigned to one-on-one until the problem is solved, and then you receive your payment.

According to the site, most tutors working with them earn on average $20/hourly. Payments are made weekly via PayPal, Payoneer, or Skrill, and you're free to choose your own hours.

You have to apply and prove your competence in the subjects you claim to be an expert in prior to acceptance.

RELATED: 15 Companies Always Hiring Work at Home Tutors

3 – SchoolSolver

SchoolSolver is the most basic-looking of all the options I've listed for you. Just click on “Answer Questions” when you visit the site, and you'll be presented with a list of homework questions students need help with, along with the amount they are willing to pay for assistance.

If you know the answer to the question, you can add it, but the buyer cannot see the answer unless they pay. This helps guarantee you get paid for your help.

I do see a lot of room for error here and students possibly claiming your answer isn't good so they don't have to pay, but then using it anyway … so just be a little cautious with this one.

Payments are made via PayPal. There do not appear to be any requirements to sign up and start answering questions.

4 – Growing Stars

Growing Stars is a bit more professional. They offer online tutoring services for elementary, middle, and high school students.

Sessions are held online and one-on-one via a whiteboard. You teach the students using the same textbooks they have in school.

There is no mention on the website of what you are paid.

The candidate registration form is located here. You are also asked to select which subject you'd like to teach in.

5 – 24HourAnswers.com

24HourAnswers.com provides online tutoring and homework help services to students for over 400 subjects.

If you are interested in tutoring for 24HourAnswers.com, you will need at least a Master’s degree, but if you’re an exceptional student with at least a Bachelor degree you can still apply with great spoken and written English skills.

Payments are made monthly via ACH Payments, Bank Transfer (International), PayPal and Payoneer.

I hope this helps you if you were looking for some work at home options and ways to earn extra cash helping kids and teens with their homework. Good luck!

woman helping child with homework

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How to Survive Forgetting Your Homework at School

Last Updated: March 9, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Katie Styzek . Katie Styzek is a Professional School Counselor for Chicago Public Schools. Katie earned a BS in Elementary Education with a Concentration in Mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She served as a middle school mathematics, science, and social studies teacher for three years prior to becoming a counselor. She holds a Master of Education (M.Ed.) in School Counseling from DePaul University and an MA in Educational Leadership from Northeastern Illinois University. Katie holds an Illinois School Counselor Endorsement License (Type 73 Service Personnel), an Illinois Principal License (formerly Type 75), and an Illinois Elementary Education Teaching License (Type 03, K – 9). She is also Nationally Board Certified in School Counseling from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 127,083 times.

Have you ever sat down to complete your homework only to realize you left some important component (like a worksheet or textbook) at school? Don’t freak out! You have many options for getting ahold of what you need or finding a suitable replacement. If all else fails, you may be able to complete the assignment when you return to school.

Getting a Copy of a Worksheet

Step 1 Photocopy a friend’s worksheet for an easy solution.

  • If you have a scanner and printer or a copy machine, you can complete this task at home.
  • Most printing places charge $0.10 for a single black and white copy.

Katie Styzek

  • Be sure to use clear grammar, complete sentences, and good etiquette in your email.
  • You can only use this method once or twice before your teacher will become frustrated with you.
  • Your teacher may be less than pleased that you don’t have the worksheet if you’ve had an extended period of time to complete it rather than if it was assigned that day.

Finding a Textbook

Step 1 Find your book at the library if possible.

  • You can search an online card catalog or call the library to see if they have your book. Then go there in person and check it out.
  • Sometimes the textbook may be “on reserve,” meaning you will have to work with it in the library.

Step 2 Search for the book online if you can’t find a hard copy.

  • Ideally, you will want to try to find the exact same edition, but a different edition will be better than nothing. Keep in mind, though, that the chapter or worksheet may be different from the one your teacher assigned.
  • If you can find out the ISBN code for your textbook, this can be a good way to search as well.

Step 3 Borrow a friend’s book for a quick remedy.

Completing the Homework Later

Step 1 Go to school early the next day to try to finish it before class.

  • If you need to get into your classroom, you can email your teacher to see if they can let you in early.

Step 2 Work during any free periods if you need to.

  • You can work during any free period, recess, or lunch in order to get the assignment done.

Step 3 Stay after school so you can turn the assignment in that day.

  • It is likely that your teacher will need to stay for a little while anyway, and they may respect your initiative to get the late assignment complete as soon as possible.

Step 4 Email it to your teacher if allowed.

  • If you have multiple email accounts, use the one associated with your school.
  • Once again, use proper grammar, complete sentences, and good etiquette when you communicate with your teacher via email. [6] X Research source

Step 5 Get an extension if necessary.

  • Keep in mind that if this happens more than once, your teacher may be less likely to give you an extension.

Expert Q&A

Alexander Peterman, MA

  • Exchange contact info with some people from your class ahead of time so that you can contact them in a situation like this one. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • When searching for answers off the Internet, don't type in the direct question. Instead, type in key parts of the question. For example, if the question is “What was the population of Canada in 1900?" type in “Population of Canada 1900” instead of the full question. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Try making a mini bag that will carry all the supplies needed to do homework, like an extra copy of every textbook, lined paper, a ruler, a protractor, etc. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

Tips from our Readers

  • Ask a friend who's in class with you to take a quick picture of the worksheet and text or email it to you. This saves you a trip to their house or having to meet up.
  • As a last resort, be honest with your teacher, explain why you don't have the assignment, and ask if you can stay late or email it to them to avoid a late grade.
  • For a textbook, call the school library first to ask if they have a copy on hold. If not, search online for either an ebook version or a different edition.
  • Check whether your teacher uses an online platform for assignments. If so, log in and see if the worksheet is posted there to print out.
  • When emailing your teacher to ask for materials, be extra polite and use proper spelling/grammar so they're more likely to help you out.
  • If you can't complete the work at home, get to school early the next morning and finish during free periods or study hall time instead.

what do you do with your homework

  • If you consistently forget your homework, you may get in trouble or your teacher may lose their trust in you. Thanks Helpful 8 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

Do Homework

  • ↑ Katie Styzek. Professional School Counselor. Expert Interview. 26 March 2021.
  • ↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/homework.html
  • ↑ https://www2.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/homework/part8.html

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IMAGES

  1. How to Do Your Homework the Right Way

    what do you do with your homework

  2. Ways to help your kids with their homework

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  3. The Benefits Of Homework: How Homework Can Help Students Succeed

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  4. My school homework routine

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  5. Easy Tips on How To Do Your Homework

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  6. Homework

    what do you do with your homework

VIDEO

  1. Pov: Did You Do YOUR Homework? 😳 Gacha Club / Life Meme

  2. How to Finish Homework Fast

  3. how homework is done in different grades

  4. When you do your Homework #homework #viral #shortvideo #shorts

  5. How Do You Say (1111) #shorts #funny

  6. Did you do your homework #rip #funny

COMMENTS

  1. How to Do Homework: 15 Expert Tips and Tricks

    1. You've just been assigned an essay in your English class that's due at the end of the week. What's the first thing you do? A. Keep it in mind, even though you won't start it until the day before it's due B. Open up your planner.

  2. How to Deal With Tons of Homework: 11 Tips for Success

    1 Create a checklist of the tasks you have. Before diving in, make a list of all the things you need to do for your homework. As you complete each task, cross it off your list. The satisfaction of checking things off will keep you motivated to continue. [1] 2 Tackle the hardest homework first.

  3. How to Do Homework (with Pictures)

    1 Make sure you have everything you need before you start. It's distracting and difficult to go searching for a ruler or a protractor after you're in the middle of your geometry homework, and it can be difficult to get back into it after going on a hunt that takes a half hour.

  4. How to Finish Your Homework: 15 Steps (with Pictures)

    Part 1 Managing Your Time Download Article 1 Set aside a specific time to do your homework. [1] Doing your homework at the same time each day will help you develop a regular routine. [2] Just make sure it's a time when you'll likely be alert and motivated.

  5. The 5 Best Homework Help Apps You Can Use

    Best App for Math Homework Help: Photomath. Price: Free (or up to $59.99 per year for premium services) Best for: Explaining solutions to math problems. This app allows you to take a picture of a math problem, and instantly pulls up a step-by-step solution, as well as a detailed explanation of the concept.

  6. How to Make a Better Homework Schedule for Your Family

    To develop a homework schedule, start by talking with your kids. Get their input on how they would like to manage their time and incorporate their homework into their daily routine. A successful homework schedule allows kids to finish their work and also have some free time. Give Kids an Option

  7. How to Enjoy Homework: 13 Steps (with Pictures)

    1 Choose a time of day when you feel energetic. If you want to enjoy doing your homework, the time of day you start can make a big difference. Everyone has certain times during the day where they feel more energetic or more tired. You're unlikely to enjoy homework if you feel exhausted while studying.

  8. 8 Easy Ways to Finish Your Homework Faster

    We know that you have more homework than ever. But even with lots and lots to do, a few tweaks to your study routine could help you spend less time getting more accomplished. Here are 8 steps to make Parkinson's Law work to your advantage: 1. Make a list. This should be a list of everything that has to be done that evening. And we mean ...

  9. Homework Help: Everything You Need to Know

    The Toronto District School Board offers a simple guideline to help determine how much homework is appropriate at each grade level. Following the guideline of 10 minutes per grade level, each grade should have this amount of homework: 30 minutes in Grade 3. 40 minutes in Grade 4. 50 minutes in Grade 5.

  10. Tell us your homework tips

    Oct. 27, 2021. The school year is underway, and homework sheets, tests and papers are piling up. As we all adjust to a more normal school year, we'd love to hear your best homework tips.

  11. The 5 Best Homework Help Websites (Free and Paid!)

    Homework help sites can also provide textbook solutions (i.e. answers to problems in tons of different textbooks your school might be using), one-on-one tutoring, and peer-to-peer platforms that allow you to discuss subjects you're learning about with your fellow students.

  12. How To Do Homework

    Today I show you how to quickly complete homework. When it comes to completing homework it's extremely important that you get it done on time, but most impor...

  13. What's the Right Amount of Homework?

    The National PTA and the National Education Association support the " 10-minute homework guideline "—a nightly 10 minutes of homework per grade level. But many teachers and parents are quick to point out that what matters is the quality of the homework assigned and how well it meets students' needs, not the amount of time spent on it.

  14. How to get into a good homework routine

    Take a screen break. If you are using a screen for your homework, try and take regular breaks from it. Stopping every 20 minutes or so, and looking outside through the window, or around you, can ...

  15. Key Lessons: What Research Says About the Value of Homework

    Too much homework may diminish its effectiveness. While research on the optimum amount of time students should spend on homework is limited, there are indications that for high school students, 1½ to 2½ hours per night is optimum. Middle school students appear to benefit from smaller amounts (less than 1 hour per night).

  16. Homework Answers: 7 Apps That Will Do Your Homework For You

    Slader. Slader is a crowdsourcing app for high school and college students to post and answer questions in math and science. While students can post original homework for help, many questions in ...

  17. Homework challenges and strategies

    By Amanda Morin Expert reviewed by Jim Rein, MA At a glance Kids can struggle with homework for lots of reasons. A common challenge is rushing through assignments. Once you understand a homework challenge, it's easier to find solutions. Most kids struggle with homework from time to time.

  18. Homework anxiety: Why it happens and how to help

    Quick tip 1 Try self-calming strategies. Try some deep breathing, gentle stretching, or a short walk before starting homework. These strategies can help reset the mind and relieve anxiety. Quick tip 2 Set a time limit. Give kids a set amount of time for homework to help it feel more manageable.

  19. Homework Hacks: 8 Tips to Get It Done Faster

    1. Plan Your Homework and Make a List When you start your homework, you'll probably jump right into the first thing on your mind or the first thing you pull out of your backpack, then work your way through the rest of your assignments. There's a better way.

  20. 3 Ways to Get Your Homework Done Fast

    Method 1 Staying Focused Download Article 1 Work in a comfortable, well-lit environment. Try sitting at a desk in a padded, comfortable chair. Avoid doing homework on the floor or on your bed, because these areas are more likely to make you sleepy and distracted. [1]

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  23. Beth McKee-Huger: Before you vote, do your homework

    Feb 18, 2024. 0. "Jasmine" is proud that she is registered to vote but, with a newborn and a job, she has a lot of responsibilities to balance right now. "Clint" is unaware of voting; he ...

  24. 5 Ways to Work at Home Helping Kids With Homework

    If you are looking for a way to earn money remotely helping kids with homework, I have a list you will want to check out. There are several companies now that pay tutors and teachers to help their ...

  25. 3 Ways to Get Homework Done when You Don't Want To

    1 Pick an easy assignment to start with. If you're having a really hard time getting started, you can ease yourself into homework mode by doing your easiest assignment first. Make sure you leave time for your hard stuff later on so you can get all of your work done. [1] Keep a list of your assignments and check them off as you finish them.

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    6 likes, 0 comments - sunnydawn.johnston on February 9, 2024: " Mind Body Spirit Practitioner Intensive Program Thursday, April 4th - Saturday, April..."

  27. 3 Ways to Avoid Getting in Trouble for Not Doing Your Homework

    Method 1 Using Good Judgment Download Article 1 Tell the truth. In most cases, being honest and direct is the best course of action. It shows that you're willing to own up and take responsibility and that you respect the teacher enough not to try to mislead them with a cooked-up story.

  28. 3 Ways to Survive Forgetting Your Homework at School

    1 Photocopy a friend's worksheet for an easy solution. If you forgot some type of worksheet or essential assignment sheet, call up a friend. Ask if you can borrow their worksheet for a few minutes. Then take the worksheet to a nearby office supply store and have it photocopied.