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Computer Applications | Microsoft Office | Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)

Microsoft Office Lesson Plans Your Students Will Love

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May 18th, 2022 | 10 min. read

Microsoft Office Lesson Plans Your Students Will Love

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Do you teach middle or high school computer applications classes? If so, it's likely that your standards include requirements on teaching Microsoft Office.

As a computer applications curriculum developer, teachers often ask how we help teach Microsoft Office and prepare students for MOS certification.

While we provide a Microsoft Office curriculum system , our solution may not be the best fit for everyone.

Some teachers are only looking for supplemental resources or tips on improving their existing lessons.

If that's the type of information you're looking for, you're in the right place!

In this article, you'll discover Microsoft Office lesson plans and teaching tips for:

  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Access
  • Microsoft Publisher
  • Microsoft Office Specialist Certification

For each of these topics, you'll find a list of recommended resources to help you teach the best Microsoft Office lessons possible.

1. Microsoft Word Lessons & Activities

Microsoft-Word-Projects-e1435676698158-2

Microsoft Word is often the first jumping off point for many computer applications classes. Rather than spend hours creating your own Microsoft Word lesson plans and activities, wouldn't you like some that you can just integrate into your existing curriculum?

That's where this post can help: Microsoft Word Lesson Plans to Wow Your Students

It contains a number of resources that you can use to teach your middle or high school students to use Microsoft Word.

Want more than just Microsoft Word lesson plans to supplement your existing curriculum?

Business&ITCenter21 has lessons, quizzes, and projects to teach your students all about Microsoft Word.

The curriculum begins with Microsoft Word Essentials , which introduces your students to the basics of the application.

Next, you can use the Microsoft Word Fundamentals lessons to give students a more in depth look at formatting content within a Word document.

Once they have mastered the basics, your students can move on to the Microsoft Word Skills Project to put their skills to the test. The project requires learners to start from scratch and fully create a document.

If you want to take it one step further, you can assign the Microsoft Word Business Project, which requires students to create a job description booklet using more advanced skills.

Looking for additional tips? Read this article: How to Teach Microsoft Word in Middle School

2. Microsoft Excel Lesson Plans

Let's face it--Excel isn't the most exciting Microsoft application out there. So what can you do to spice up your Microsoft Excel lesson plans ? Make them relevant to your students!

So where can you find engaging, relevant Microsoft Excel lesson ideas?

Start by reviewing these popular Microsoft Excel lesson plan resources :

  • Excel Tutorials from GCFLearnFree.org
  • Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets Lesson Plan Bundle from Computer Creations
  • Lessons & Activities Bundle for Microsoft Excel from TechCheck Lessons

Each of these resources can help supplement any teacher's lessons on Microsoft Excel.

But what if you need more than a few extra spreadsheet activities?

Our computer applications curriculum has you covered with Excel, too!

The first module in the sequence is the Microsoft Excel Essentials , which provides an overview of working with spreadsheets, cells, rows, and columns. Students also learn about using basic functions and formulas.

Next, students can work through Microsoft Excel Fundamentals . This module provides an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft Excel, including relative and absolute cell references, common functions, and formatting.

If you need to cover more advanced skills and features within Excel, you can assign the Microsoft Excel Skills Project or Microsoft Excel Business Project .

3. Microsoft PowerPoint Lesson Plans

Microsoft-PowerPoint-Lesson-Plans

PowerPoint is sometimes considered to be overused in schools, both by instructors and students. Because of this, it’s important that your Microsoft PowerPoint lesson plans are right on par (or above and beyond!)

Your PowerPoint lessons should be more than just a How-To. You must make sure that your students understand how a presentation can effectively (and ineffectively) be used.

So how can you teach your students to effectively use Microsoft PowerPoint?

We recommend you start with four topics on Microsoft PowerPoint:

  • An Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint
  • The Basics of Building a PowerPoint Presentation
  • More Features in PowerPoint
  • Do’s & Don’ts of Effective Presentations

To find teaching tips and activity outlines, read these articles:

  • Best PowerPoint Lessons for Middle School
  • 4 Best PowerPoint Lesson Plans for High School  

Need more structure and resources to teach Microsoft PowerPoint?

In Business&ITCenter21, the Microsoft PowerPoint Essentials module provides an overview of Microsoft PowerPoint essentials, themes, templates, and adding and inserting a variety of items into a presentation.

Then, in the Microsoft PowerPoint Fundamentals module , students learn about creating effective presentations that are interesting, engaging, and functional.

Once your students have the basics down, you can move on to more advanced concepts and features with the Microsoft PowerPoint Skills Project and Microsoft PowerPoint Business Project .

4. Microsoft Access Lesson Plans

where-to-find-microsoft-access-lessons-and-projects

Microsoft Access can be a challenging subject for middle school and high school students. So it’s no surprise that Microsoft Access lesson plans   are a challenge for computer applications teachers.

To help you save time , we put together a list of popular Microsoft Access teaching resources :

  • GCF Learn Free
  • Tonya Skinner's Website
  • Teachers Pay Teachers

Each of these websites has a variety of materials to help you teach Microsoft Access skills.

In addition, check out the Microsoft Access Fundamentals module within Business&ITCenter21.

This module provides an overview of database theory as students gain practical experience with Microsoft Access.

5. Microsoft Publisher Lesson Plans

Do you give Microsoft Publisher its fair share of attention? Many computer applications educators avid including Microsoft Publisher lesson plans in their curriculum.

We've found that's often because they don’t know where to find good Microsoft Publisher lessons!

pin-microsoft-publisher-activities

To help you get started, we put together a list of popular Microsoft Publisher lessons and activities :

  • Tangipahoa Parish School System
  • Cape May County Technical School District
  • Council Rock High School South
  • Rochester Hills Public Library
  • Instructables
  • Shawano School District
  • Microsoft Office Support
  • Business&ITCenter21

Each of these resources can help you introduce Microsoft Publisher to your students when added to your existing Microsoft Office lesson plans.

But are you looking for a more structured resource on Publisher? If so, check out the Microsoft Publisher Fundamentals module within Business&ITCenter21.

This module provides an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft Publisher through the creation of a number of desktop publishing documents.

6. Microsoft Office Certification Prep

mos-word-badge

In our experience, we've found that teachers searching for Microsoft Office lesson plans are often also interested in preparing their students for the Microsoft Office Specialist certification exams.

To help your students prepare for certification, you most likely need more than just a lesson or two. It might be beneficial to also include test prep material to help your students prepare.

For tips on how to best prepare your students for MOS certification, read these articles:

  • How to Prepare Students for the MOS Word Exam
  • Steps for Successful Microsoft Excel Test Prep
  • GMetrix vs. Business&ITCenter21 for MOS Certification Prep
  • How One Teacher Prepares Her Students for MOS Success

Start Teaching Microsoft Office Skills Today!

All of the resources and ideas listed on this page can help you put together a great Microsoft Office curriculum.

However, if you're like most computer applications teachers you don't have much time to spare for piecing together a hodgepodge of lessons and activities.

If you need a more robust Microsoft Office solution that helps you teach all of the Microsoft Office applications, consider looking into a full curriculum.

There are many Microsoft Office curriculum options available so it can feel overwhelming to decide which one is right for you.

In this article, you'll read a comparison of four popular Microsoft Office curriculum resources that teachers like you recommend to others. Start reading to discover which one is right for you and your students:

word project for high school students

word project for high school students

The One Word Project

  • August 1, 2021
  • Seminar , Writing

Do you remember when you were a kid and people told you “sticks and stones will break your bones but words will never hurt you”?  They were SOOOOOOO wrong.  Words matter.  That’s why I am here today talking about the impact that focusing on just ONE word and The One Word Project.

The Story of the One Word, Happiness 

In the spring of 2020, my students, both English 11 and AP Literature needed something positive to focus their attention.  It was May.  We had been in lock down since March and it was beginning to take a toll on everyone.  You all lived it too, so you know what I am talking about.  My co-teacher, Amber from  Success through Literacy , and I came up with “the happiness project.”  Students focused their attention on the word happiness and what makes them happy.  The AP kids wrote definition essays and developed videos to present happiness in their lives.  The English 11 kids did a scaled down variation.

Their projects blew my mind. Each project was a beautiful reflection of each individual student.  They presented them to me and in some cases other people they invited which ranged from our principal to family and friends.  

So that is just one way that you can use ONE WORD in the classroom, but what about other ways that you can use just one word to really have an impact in your classroom community?

The One Word Project | a yearlong project for high school students

What is The One Word Project?  The idea behind The One Word Project is that instead of making a New Year’s Resolution, you select a word and that becomes your mantra for the year.  It’s a great way to think differently about new starts which can come in January or if you are a teacher or student, in September.  Really, it can come at any time that you are looking for a new start.

When my first Happiness Project was over I knew that not only did this project need to be repeated.  It needs to be expanded.  So for the 2020-2021 school year, I let my students pick their own words in September.  They selected their words, made them visible and reflected on the denotations, connotations, synonyms and antonyms.  But it didn’t end there.  Each month I gave them a writing prompt to keep them connected to the word.  In January, they were able to reevaluate their word and decide if it still fit them.  Then we followed through at the end of the year with a similar project to our Happiness project of 2020–a definition essay and a video.  And those videos…. There are no words, which is kind of ironic. (You can find  this project here .)

word project for high school students

Other Ways to Use One Word in the Classroom

One word sel checks.

All throughout the year, Amber Walther of Success Through Literacy and I used our bell-ringers/warm-ups in English 11 for social emotional learning check-ins.  We had many students who were fully remote and we were concerned about their well being.  We used a variety of prompts, but one of my favorites was “Give us one word to tell us how you are doing and explain why.”  It really gave us an opportunity to check in with our students in a way that was quick and intentional.  ( A free template here. )

One Word Seminars: Uses one word prompts to spur discussions in high school English classes

One Word Seminars

At some point during the year, I wondered what would happen if students used a one word prompt to look at the literature we were reading.  So I made some Jamboard slides for Hamlet .  I asked students to write one word to describe X, then we used that as the basis of a full class discussion.  These discussions were SOOOOOO GOOD.  It was a different take on the text.  Students debated the word choices (because of course there were different opinions) and it gave voice to students who don’t love speaking out loud. ( Get Hamlet One Word Discussion Starters here .)

Thinking about Your Classroom

How might you be able to harness the power of One Word in your classroom?  Will it be a yearlong project?  SEL? Seminars?  Do you have other ideas?  Leave them in the comments below.

A Yearlong Reflective Writing Project for High School--9 Monthly prompts plus a final project related to a word selected and followed throughout the year.

An Easy Way to the  One Word Project

If you love the idea of the Power of One Word but don’t have time to put the work in, check out  The One Word Project for High Schoo l, a yearlong project, The One Word Seminar for Hamlet:  Hamlet Discussion Starters , and don’t forget to grab your  free SEL Warm Up .

Just be sure to take some time to harness the power of one word.

Related Resources

9 New Years Activities for High School English : even more ideas for the new school year or the new calendar year.

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The One Word Project: a year long project for high school English

One Word Discussion for Hamlet

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Lesson Plans for Teaching Microsoft Office or Microsoft 365

Ready-made activities for computer skills in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint

Looking for fun, ready-made lesson plans for teaching ​ Microsoft Office skills?

These resources help you teach your students programs such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Access, and Publisher within the context of real-life scenarios. 

Lesson plans for elementary, middle grade, or high school students. Some may even be appropriate for basic computer classes at the college level. Best of all, most of these are free!

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Most teachers know whether or not their school district offers computer skills curriculum or lesson plans.

Some school districts even post free resources online, so you can take a look and perhaps even download resources. If you are new to a teaching position, you may want to check out your organization's resources first. That way, you know your curriculum aligns with district policies.

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Get Microsoft computing lessons with fun topics for elementary school, middle school, and high school students.

You can also find free web quests and other technology-related lessons on this site, as well as overviews of how programs like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint are useful for students' learning in general as well as how they might need it in future pursuits.

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Find resources for teachers such as the Common Core Implementation Kit and more. This extensive site includes courses, tutorials, resources for tools like Skype , and more. 

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You may also be interested in integrating Microsoft's own certifications with your curriculum. This prepares your students to be more marketable once they leave your class.

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For a variety of free lesson plans in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for middle school students, check out this site.

Another great tool on this site is a matrix showing how these lessons cross over into other subject areas such as science, math, language arts, and more. 

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Most focus on Microsoft Word , with a few for Excel as well. 

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One free lesson plan each month.

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Lesson plans are not free.

Complicated search tool.

This site offers premium lesson plans for Office 2007, 2010, or 2013 at affordable prices.

Lessons feature real-life applications your students will love. Here's a quote from their site:

"Promote an amusement park. Design posters in Word, surveys in Excel, ads in PowerPoint, and more!"

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20 Microsoft Word Activities for Middle School Students

July 8, 2022 //  by  Kaitlyn Punzalan

Microsoft Word is an effective tool in the classroom. The platform can assist in student learning, organizing, and the development of 21st-century skills. These skills develop critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity. Microsoft Word helps develop and cultivate these skills in a variety of ways.

Students can use Microsoft Word to explore new content or deepen their understanding of the topic. It can also help students take notes or organize their learning throughout the school year.

Use the lessons, activities, and other ideas listed here to help enhance your students' learning using Microsoft Word.

1. My Life As a Movie

A great beginning of the year lesson is to have students create an autobiography in Microsoft Word. This project gets creative by asking students to create a DVD cover inside of a booklet to share about their life with their peers.

Learn more: Teachers Pay Teachers

2. Name Acrostic

Another great beginning of the year project is an acrostic poem. Students type their name's vertically, then write adjectives that would describe them horizontally. Students can use bold, italics, colors, and shadows to express their personalities. This is a fun and easy activity to have students complete on the first day of school as you can display them throughout the year!

Learn more: Student Web

3. Annotate Digital Texts

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Annotating the text, or highlighting and taking notes in the margin, is a literacy skill middle school students should develop. Students can annotate a text digitally in Microsoft Word using the highlight and comment feature. Students can highlight the text using a variety of colors and make digital comments on each of these highlights. This is an extremely valuable tool as it allows students to annotate a variety of texts, not just print!

Learn more: Groovy Post

4. Peer-Review and Writing Feedback

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Microsoft Word is a great tool for peer review. Students can collaborate on their writing with their classmates by sharing the document and then using the track changes feature. This allows one student to provide feedback and changes to another student’s writing while allowing the original owner of the writing to keep the original document and see the writing suggestions.

Learn more: Microsoft

5. Resume Writing

Students can practice writing a resume in Microsoft Word. Since Word offers a variety of basic functions, tools, and templates, students can choose a template that would best represent a future career of their choice. This activity provides students with real-world practice and develops an essential skill they will need in the future.

Learn more: Resume Genius

6. Formal Letter Writing

Another amazing writing skill to practice with students is teaching how to write a formal letter. This lost form of communication is still incredibly important for students to learn. Students can learn how to properly format a letter to include the heading, address, body, and signature. Teachers can easily use the templates provided in Microsoft Word to help students learn the proper writing structure for formal letters.

Learn more: Lisa Doe

7. Write a Newspaper

Microsoft Word also has accessible templates to teach students how to write a newspaper article. Students can practice their expository writing skills by creating a newspaper article. This is a great assignment that teaches students real-world writing skills and is fun! Writing prompts could include both fiction and non-fiction and can be embedded in a variety of units.

8. Mini-Book Project

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This project takes the idea of a traditional book report to a new level! Students use Word to create a mini-book using colorful templates and tables. This assignment asks students to demonstrate their comprehension of a novel while allowing the students to practice their technology skills as well!

9. Create Flashcards

Microsoft Word offers students a ton of amazing critical learning tools to help study and organize their learning. Students can create flashcards using Microsoft Word to help them study. These flashcards can be saved in OneDrive and students can access them at all times.

Learn more: Andrew Who

10. Digital Planner

Another great way to use Microsoft Word to help students organize is by creating a digital planner. Word offers a variety of planner templates to help students keep track of assignments, homework, and other important dates.

Learn more: Template.net

11. Online Notebook

Microsoft OneNote allows students access to a variety of features to create a digital notebook. Students can take notes, add photos, and include audio and video recordings in their notebooks. This is a great resource for students who attend online school. Teachers can also create OneNote notebooks for their students to allow them to all have the same note-taking experience or basic school report.

Learn more: Microsoft OneNote

12. Make a Family Tree

Students can create a genogram in Microsoft Word to learn more about their families. This project allows students to discover more about their ancestors through the formation of a family tree.

Learn more: It Still Works

13. Create a Word Cloud

Word clouds can be a great way to allow students to demonstrate their overall understanding or summary of a topic. Microsoft Word allows users to create a word cloud using one of the add-on features.

Learn more: The Tech Train

14. Create Digital Art

Microsoft Word allows students to practice their writing skills , but it also has a variety of features for creative expression. Students can create digital art using the drawing tools such as shapes, fill, shading, and other features in Word.

15. Create a Book Cover

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This project is another fun deviation away from the traditional book report. Students can use Word to create a book cover connected to the theme of the novel. Using the borders, images, fonts, and colors students can demonstrate their comprehension of a book in a new way!

Learn more: Innovations in Techology

16. Invent an Animal

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Students can get creative and invent their own animals. Students can draw the animal using the shapes and images in Microsoft Word. After drawing their own animal, students can use text to describe their animal and make connections to other cross-curricular areas.

Learn more: Innovations in Technology

17. Plan a Vacation

Students can research and budget their own faux vacation. This lesson idea teaches students real-life skills such as organizing and money planning. Students then compile their research in Microsoft Word and create a travel brochure.

18. Progress Monitor Student Work

While Microsoft Word offers a variety of ways to expand student learning, it also has many tools to help teachers. One way teachers can use Microsoft Word is to progress monitor student learning. Using the "activity" feature, teachers can view student progress including the date and time of each activity completed.

Learn more: Foetron Academy

19. Create Handouts

Teachers are always doing their best to individualize the learning for all their students. Microsoft Word is a great way to create handouts that best meet their students' needs no matter the lesson plan.

Learn More: Techwalla

20. Transfer Work Documents to iPad

Many students, teachers, and parents use Apple products, but that does not limit their ability to use Microsoft Word. Documents can be transferred to pages allowing for unlimited access to the resources for any school project.

Learn More: Trusoljahs

word project for high school students

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16 Ideas for Student Projects Using Google Docs, Slides, and Forms

July 31, 2016

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As you probably know, Google Drive is far more than a place to store files online. It also includes a suite of versatile creation tools, many of which perform the same functions as the ones we use in other spaces. These include  Google Docs,  a word processing program that behaves similarly to Microsoft Word,  Google Slides,  a presentation program similar to PowerPoint, and  Google Forms,  a survey-creation tool similar to Survey Monkey.  Although Drive also includes other tools, these three are particularly useful for creating rigorous, academically robust projects. If your school uses Google Classroom or at least gives students access to Google Drive, your students are probably already using these tools to write papers or create slideshow presentations, but there are other projects they could be doing that you may not have thought of.

Below I have listed 16 great ideas for projects using Google Docs, Slides, and Forms.

Annotated Bibliography By the time a student reaches the later years of high school, and certainly by the time she’s gotten to college, it’s likely that she’ll be required to write an annotated bibliography, a list of resources that not only includes the bibliographical information of each source, but also a short paragraph summarizing the resource and reflecting on its usefulness for a given project. Usually an annotated bibliography is required as a part of a larger research paper, but it could stand alone as an assignment that tasks students with seeking out and evaluating sources just for the practice of doing so. And the research tools in Google Docs allow students to locate, read, and cite their sources all in one place. To learn more, see this guide from Cornell University Library on How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography .

Book Review Instead of a book report, have students write a book review instead. This is certainly not a new idea, but publishing the work electronically allows students to enhance the final product with the book’s cover image, a link to the book’s page on Amazon, and even links to other titles the author has written or articles on related topics. For models and inspiration, elementary and middle school students can read student-written reviews on sites like Spaghetti Book Club . Older or advanced students might work toward more sophisticated, nuanced review styles like book reviews written on Oprah.com .

Collaborative Story Because Google Docs is cloud-based, multiple people can work on a Doc at the same time. So students can work together on a story, a script for a play, or any other kind of group writing project. They can use the comments feature to give each other feedback and make decisions together. And because students can work from any location with an Internet connection, collaboration isn’t restricted to school hours; each group member can work on the project from any location whenever they have time.

Media-Rich Research Paper Any kind of research paper can be given a big boost when done in a Google Doc, because students can insert images, drawings, and links to other relevant resources, like articles and videos. Using the research tools built into Docs, students can research their topics and include in-text citations with footnotes.

Super Simple Blog If you don’t want to mess with actual blogging platforms, but want students to be able to experience writing blog posts that contain images and hyperlinks to other websites, this could be accomplished easily in a single running Google Doc.

Table Being able to organize information visually is an important skill, and students who understand how to build a table in Google Docs will have a skill for presenting all kinds of information in the future. They can be used as a compare and contrast exercise, to display data from an experiment, or even put together a schedule. Yes, you could do these things yourself, print them, and have students fill them out, but why not have students practice creating the tables themselves? 

Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Story Because slides can contain hyperlinks to other slides, students could build a whole story where the reader chooses different options at key points in the story, leading them down completely different paths. The reader would consume the content as a slideshow, clicking on the links themselves as they go through. This could be a pretty massive undertaking, but we all know students who would be totally up for the challenge.

E-book These could take a variety of forms: mini-textbooks, children’s books, cookbooks or how-to manuals, personal art or writing portfolios, even yearbook-style memory books. To learn more about the possibilities, see my post from earlier this year on  Student E-Books .

Magazine Along the same lines as an e-book, students could use a similar template to create a PDF magazine or newsletter that is shared online on a regular schedule. The possibilities here are endless, useful for student clubs or sports teams, classroom or grade-level newsletters, or magazines put out by groups of students who share a common interest, like gaming systems, soccer, or books.

Museum Kiosk Imagine if we could enhance science fair projects with a looping video display that provides the audience with vivid visuals and text about our topic. Or imagine an art show, where a self-running informational slideshow could be placed beside an art display to share the story behind the piece and photos of the work in progress? This is possible and EASY in Google Slides: Simply create a slideshow, then use the “Publish to the Web” feature to create a slideshow that auto-advances and has no need for a presenter. Pop that up on an iPad or laptop and you’re all set. This mock-up of a slideshow on Coral Reefs shows you what it could look like (click the image to open in a new window).

Short Film Students can upload their own images and add text boxes to a slideshow to create an animated story, then record the slideshow with a Google extension called Screencastify . They can either record their own voice as narration, add background music, or both. There are so many different kinds of films students could produce: illustrated stories or poems, final reflections for a 20 Time or Genius Hour project, video textbooks on content-related topics, or news-like feature stories of school or community events. In this quick sample, I added music from YouTube’s library of royalty-free music that anyone can use to enhance their recordings:

Video Tutorial Using the same screencasting software mentioned above, students could also create their own video tutorials by creating a Slides presentation on their topic (such as “How to Open a Combination Lock”), then recording the slideshow with narration. This would make a nice final product for a unit on informational writing or a way for students to demonstrate their learning at the end of a unit in science (“How to Take Care of Lab Equipment”), social studies (“How to Measure Distance on a Map”), or math (“How to Multiply Fractions”). Student-made tutorials could even be created to teach classroom procedures. And any tutorials students make could be stored for later, so other students can also benefit from them.  Learn more about how Screencastify works right inside Chrome .

Peer Survey Whenever students need to gather data to support an argumentative essay or speech, let them gather data quickly and easily by creating a survey with Google Forms. Links to the survey can be sent out via email, QR codes , or through a post in a learning management system like Edmodo or Google Classroom. When results come in, students can use them to support whatever claim they are trying to make in their argument, or make adjustments based on what they discover in their research.

Feedback Form Have students provide feedback to each other’s presentations, speeches, even videos using Google Forms. Here’s how it would work: Each student creates her own form, asking for the kind of feedback she wants on the project. As other students view or the project, they can be sent to a form to offer praise or constructive criticism, which the creator would then be able to view privately and use to improve the project. Students could even use their feedback to write a reflection on their process after the project is done.

Quiz One great way to learn material is to create a test or quiz over the content. Have students use Google Forms to create their own multiple-choice, True/False, fill-in-the-blank, or open-ended quizzes on the content they are learning.

Visual Representation of Data Sets Whenever people enter responses to a Form, Google allows the form creator to view responses in charts and graphs. Have students gain a better understanding of how data can be represented visually by accepting responses (or entering their own fake ones) into a Form, then looking at how the numbers are represented in graphs. This could work well as a series of math lessons.

Way Beyond Worksheets

Just this morning on Twitter, someone posted a comment along these lines: “A worksheet on a Google Doc is STILL a worksheet. Students should be using tech to create!” I’ve heard this sentiment over and over, and it’s exactly why I’ve put this list together. Google offers some incredibly powerful tools if we know how to use them. I hope this list has given you a few new ideas to put into your students’ hands. ♦

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word project for high school students

Categories: Instruction , Technology

Tags: assessment , content area literacy , English language arts , Grades 3-5 , Grades 6-8 , Grades 9-12 , project-based learning , teaching with tech , tech tools

51 Comments

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This is wonderful.

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This is my first year teaching in an alternative high school. All students have IEP’s as well as social and emotional disabilities. I really want to focus on literacy as many are well below grade-level, ability wise. Writing of course is a big part of literacy. I’m looking for ideas that they can collaborate on, via Google Docs, Slides, etc. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

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Check out Boomwriter: A Fun Twist on Collaborative Writing . Lots of good resources there that you might like. Also take a look at Student-Made E-Books: A Beautiful Way to Demonstrate Learning .

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I am an RSP teacher in Anaheim. For summer school I am going to have them build a “Bucket List” in Google slides.

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Thanks for compiling these resources. I use many already but haven’t tried Screencastify yet. My district uses Google Classroom, but the forms app is blocked on student accounts- I think because it’s a perfect medium for under-the-radar cyberbullying (“How much do you hate Linda?…A little, a lot, a ton…”). Before teachers plan a lesson using forms, they should make sure the feature is enabled for students in their district. In my district, students can access forms and create them but they cannot send them to other students.

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Thanks, Robyn. Good to know!

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I love these ideas! You are so creative and now I have GREAT ideas for my SS project! Thanks! XD

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this is all true

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Our district is allowing extra credit this year and I have always been totally opposed to offering extra credit. These ideas are worth extra credit, and my focus this year is on what the students can teach me and the rest of their peers.

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This gave me some good ideas for culminating activities. Thanks!

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Thank you so much for sharing these ideas about creating projects by using the Google Drive! The middle school I teach at implemented a 1:1 program last year with Chromebooks, so the students have easy access to all of the Google apps. I had always grown up using Word docs and I was a little hesitant to start using Google docs at first. After just a few weeks, I absolutely fell in love with it! It is amazing how you can access all of your docs, forms, slides that you create from any device you’re using and the fact that everything automatically saves is just the cherry on top. I am grateful for this feature, especially working in a middle school where it is easy for students to forget to save something before exiting out. Although I teach Math, I found a lot of your project ideas to be utilized cross-curriculum and I truly appreciate it. I got my feet wet last year and had my students create google slides presentations in groups. At the beginning of this year, I started with a google form I created where students answered review questions from 6th grade Math. I love that when you get the results from all of the forms, you can easily see which areas students are struggling in and which areas they are proficient in because it is presented the results in graphs and charts. I just learned recently that you can create quizzes now, which is awesome because all of the testing in my district is done on the computers, so this will help prepare my students. I want to borrow your idea of having students create peer surveys that they can post on Google classroom in order to gather information and analyze results. This is a great skill for students to have. Thanks again, I truly enjoy reading your blogs!

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Be positive at all time

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Great collection of resources! Easy to read and very helpful for teachers who often do not get the tutorials they need to instruct with GAFE. I particular like the Museum Kiosk idea. It will work great will my history classes.

– Kevin

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Hi everyone! I also would like to suggest my own (free) templates site. Im designing these presentations using “free” resources from other sites such as FreePik, FlatIcon,… and I think the result is pretty good. I invite you to have a look. The site is https://slidesppt.com

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In the section of student blog posts, can you clarify how all the students in one class could be writing and posting a running blog which everyone in the class can read and respond to ?

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This is Holly Burcham, a Customer Experience Manager. The idea Jenn laid out here is to simply create a shared Google Doc where each student would basically be responsible for his/her own page (literally page 1, page 2, etc.). Within a shared Doc, everyone with permission can be in and typing at the same time. Once “posts” are written, students can go in and add comments to others’ work. The comments would show up in the margins and would be arranged by corresponding content, not time like a typical blog post.

But, as you can imagine, this could quickly become very convoluted and a bit messy. The thought behind using Docs as a student blog is more for writing practice, getting the feel for writing a blog post without doing the real thing…

So, if you’re interested in your students truly creating a blog, we highly recommend checking out Edublogs and Kidblog . Hope this helps!

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How are these good for projects? you said that these are for kid presentations, all I see are essay templates and idea’s for teachers to map out their classroom jobs(other then the coral)

Hi, Isaac! I’m not sure what could be used to map out classroom jobs specifically from this post, and I think the ideas here go way beyond essay outlines–please get back to me to clarify exactly what you’re referring to, because we believe all the ideas here are good for student use. Thanks!

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You might update this post. Google Forms now supports branching which would be much easier to create a “choose your own” adventure type experience.

Thanks for the suggestion. I can picture how that would work, yes, but I guess the aesthetic experience might be lacking in a Google Form. With Slides you have complete creative freedom to design the slides like a real book. I guess it would be a matter of personal preference?

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Where do I go to find accessibility features of Google docs, slides, and forms? I am a teacher of the blind and visually impaired. This technology is wonderful but without the ability to navigate the site independently, my students are at a lost. Can you direct me?

Hi! A couple of things that may be of help: Go to “Tools” in the menu bar and select Voice Typing (use Google Chrome). You can also click on Add-Ons in the menu bar and add the Speech Recognition Soundwriter extension for free. Here’s a link to find more Google Accessibility features — you just have to spend a bit of time looking through the list to see what may be relevant to your needs. I hope this helps!

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You can also combine Google forms and docs to simplify book reports for elementary students: https://electriceducator.blogspot.com/2016/03/elementary-book-report-machine.html?m=1

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Is there an available rubric or assessment piece for the museum kiosk activity?

Hi Colleen! No, sorry, I don’t have anything on that!

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Hi I am a teacher at a elementary school and I was wondering if you had any ideas for what I could do for an autobiography book report.

Hi Madison,

There really are so many things you can have the kids do — I would first think about what you’re expecting the kids to be able to do in the end. What will actually be assessed and what will they be accountable for? (I suggest checking out Understanding Backward Design if you haven’t already.) From there, they can choose how to present what they learned, meeting the assessment criteria. I think using some of the ideas in the Slides section of the post could work really well, especially Student Made E-Books , or making a short film.

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Madison, I love the idea of using Google Slides for autobiography book report. I’m thinking about Jennifer’s Slides suggestions and just tailoring it to your book report criteria/rubric. Thoughts?

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thank you very much!!

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Thank you! I can’t wait to explore some of these options more. This list is very much appreciated! 🙂

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I really appreciate your kindness and your efforts and I’m going to try everything you have mentioned in this wonderful article

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Thanks. Higher Ed ESOL Prof -no lesson prep for me… but I DO have my reading list for the next several (10-12) hours! All suggestions added to the original post are appreciated.

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I am a huge fan of Google resources, but you have showed me some new ways I can use these. Thank you for sharing!

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Thanks for some great ideas! I have another suggestion that I have used before- my students really liked it- a collaborative Google Slides presentation. I did this for types of organic molecules as an intro to organic chemistry. Each pair of students in the class was assigned a specific molecule to research. They had to create 1 slide with some specific information and add to a collaborative google slides presentation that I shared on Google Classroom. When the slideshow was complete, they could all access it, and they used it to take notes.

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Great suggestion Susan! Thanks so much for sharing this idea.

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I am wondering if I can find similar google instructions to send to my students now that we are teaching remotely and 90% of them probably don’t know how to use Google. This would be a fantastic use of their time. Thank you

Take a look at Jenn’s Google Drive Basics video course ! I think it’s got what you’re looking for – it’s for teachers and students!

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I am thinking about doing a Rap Challenge in which they (as teams based on which class period they are in) create lyrics using WWII vocabulary we have used.

I create raps for my students and my though was that I would take parts of ALL of their submissions and create a WWII rap to add to the collection they have heard already.

Which of the Google Drive features would be my best bet for collaboration like that while the students are all working from home?

Hi Jim! I think this could be done in Google Docs pretty easily, as they are just writing a script, correct? If you want to share video or audio, you can just put these files into a shared folder in Drive and give all students access to those files. I hope this helps!

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Amazing ideas

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An innovative way to eliminate paper.

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Hi! I love this site. I am beginning to use technology in my higehr education classroom. Could you help me to suggest some kind of game to use in Communication Skilss? Thanks a lot

Hi! Check out our Gamification Pinterest board and see what might be relevant. Hope this helps!

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I’m a college student (who is now a nanny which brought me to this page) and for the screen recording, I highly reccomend Loom over Screencastify. In my experience using both during the remote learning period, the video quality is much higher on Loom, the user interface is easier, and you can’t edit Screencastify videos in an external editor like iMovie. (I had to do a group presentation and since partner lived in Kuwait we used this vs Zoom, etc. to record the presentation since we weren’t recording at the same time. It was very difficult to figure out how to merge our parts of the presentation into a single file.)

Also with screencastify the time limit per video on the free version (5 min I think) was frustrating as my work was longer. May not be a problem for students but for educators using the tool who don’t have the premium, this could be highly inconvenient. With Loom there isn’t a time limit.

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What an adventure for me, who’s relatively new to this google drive thing. Mind blowing resources. It’s amazing. I’m excited as to what I can do with and in google drive. I’m definitely taking it one day at a time, will surely enjoy this ‘CRUISE’. Thank you Jennifer.

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What does it mean to type I am from Germany?

Hi Flannery! It can mean a few different things depending on the context–either typing on a keyboard or the “kind” of something (“What type of ice cream do you like?”). We’d love to give a specific answer, so please let us know which part of the post or which comment you saw that you’d like more clarification on. Thanks!

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Thanks for sharing these ideas. July 2021

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I love all the awesome ways to incorporate technology in the classroom. This post had so many options to choose from and some that I personally loved when I was in school. There are so many different ways to make learning fun with technology!

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So glad you enjoyed the post!

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8 Reading Activities for High Schoolers That They'll Actually Enjoy

Reading and writing skills are important at any age, but we know it's not always easy to keep older kids engaged. Reading activities for high school have to be really compelling to compete with all the other things vying for teens' attention. These fun literacy activities will have them putting down their phones and picking up their pencils.

Need to Know Literacy is a broad term used to describe skills related to reading and writing. While much of the focus on literacy takes place in elementary school, there's definitely a need for continued development of skills at all grade levels.

Fun Reading Comprehension Activities for High School

There's no denying that a major component of literacy is reading comprehension, or the ability to make sense of the words on a page. The thing is, it's not always an easy thing to teach because it's such a broad topic. Students need to understand different kinds of texts across many aspects of life including work, home, and family.

These activities help you zero in on specific aspects of reading comprehension while keeping kids' attention.

Create a Quiz

Instead of having students take quizzes or tests after reading a novel, we love the idea of allowing the students to create the quiz. A test is meant to see what a student has learned after studying specific materials. This activates a student's ability to remember information, but it doesn't do the job of teaching reading comprehension.

Creating a quiz will make students think more specifically about what information was important and how to examine whether someone else has learned that information. This is a tricky way to teach reading comprehension because they have to work hard to know the material before they can write a quiz about it.

Preparation:

Create a list of short stories appropriate for your class

Instructions :

  • Ask each student to choose a short story from your approved list.
  • After reading the story, challenge students to create a comprehensive quiz about the story. Quizzes can be no less than 10 questions and no more than 20. Questions can cover a variety of topics such as characters, plot, and theme.
  • Once the quiz is complete, have students create an answer key.
  • Assign the selected stories as homework, or read and discuss them as a class. Use the student-created quizzes to gauge individual understanding of the story.

Online Profile of a Villain

We love this creative literacy activity that really lets kids get into the details of characters. The concept is simple; readers must select a book based only on a fake online profile created using its content. There are no cover images, author names, or plot summaries visible. This is fun way to get students focused on understanding characters and reading outside of their comfort zones.

An awesome bonus is that a student will need to consider all context clues if they hope to find a book in their preferred genre. If they end up with a genre they might not choose, they get to see how they feel about it (it might just be a new fave).

Preparation: 

  • Ask each student to think of a book they would recommend to a friend. Supply reading lists if necessary.
  • From the chosen book, each student should then write a character summary of the most villainous character.
  • You'll need to have card stock and markers on hand.

Instructions: 

  • Using the character summary, students should create an online profile of the villain. Remind students that a profile highlights positive qualities so they will need to put a positive spin on any negative traits.
  • Write the completed profile on the piece of card stock. Illustrations and creative text techniques are allowed to enhance this new cover for the selected book as long as they do not include an obvious clue as to the villain's identity.
  • All students should place their completed book covers at the front of the room.
  • Choose an order and have students select a character that they might want to learn more about. The book they select will be the next reading assignment.

World Mapping

Many children's stories and fantasy books have a map of the fictional world included. These maps can provide a fun backdrop for a unique listening and reading comprehension activity. Students will be challenged to hear their partner above all others and interpret their words into an image.

Need to Know Active listening skills are an integral aspect of adolescent literacy and a big component of reading comprehension. Listening not only involves hearing a word but also interpreting its meaning, and that's great practice for understanding and processing what you read.
  • Select two to five "other world" maps illustrated in popular fantasy books, like Winnie the Pooh or Lord of the Rings .
  • Prepare a step-by-step script of directions for drawing each map.
  • You'll need to have blank paper and colored pencils for each pair of students.

Instructions:

  • Separate the class into pairs. Give one person from each pair the script and the other person a blank paper and colored pencils. It's suggested that no two groups have the same world.
  • All pairs should start the activity at the same time. This will create a loud atmosphere full of distractions.
  • To start, the script reader should begin telling his partner the directions in the correct order. The person with the paper will need to listen to his partner, follow the directions, and create a world map.
  • Once all maps are complete, groups with the same script can show a comparison of their world map.
  • Open a discussion about what part of the activity was most difficult and why.

Activities to Connect Literacy and Modern Media

Viral videos, countless social media platforms, and entertainment flood the lives of teenagers today, but reading and writing don't have to compete for attention with them. We love the idea of incorporating all kinds of media into reading activities for high school to entice teens to participate and help them expand their knowledge to real life.

Make Your Own Photo Meme

Our phones are absolutely flooded with photos these days, and Instagram is a fixture at this point. Memes are all about combining words with photos, and coming up with the right words is a big part of literacy. The goal of this activity is to give students some light-hearted practice at writing. Students will be challenged to come up with text on the spot, but the humorous nature of the photos should help keep stress levels low.

  • Print funny images from the internet, leaving space on the paper to write under the image. On the back of the image write a genre such as romance, dystopian, science fiction, comedy, drama, or mystery.
  • Give each student one image and a few minutes to examine it.
  • Instruct students to write a funny sentence or two describing their image as it pertains to the given genre, basically creating their own meme. For example, an image of a kitten wrestling a rabbit with the word "mystery" on the back might prompt a caption like "I'm not kitten. Somebunny got hurt, and we need to find out whodunnit."
  • One by one, ask students to share their meme with the class.
  • After each speech, have the class guess what genre the meme would fit in.

Re-Tweet Poetry

Communicating effectively without a ton of words is a skill that can take some practice. On X (previously known as Twitter), the limited character count of posts challenges writers to get a point across in a concise manner.

Preparation :

Assign a poem to each student. Have the students read the poem before the activity.

  • Familiarize the class with the guidelines for X, namely the maximum character count of 280.
  • Students must first rewrite each stanza of the poem to fit into a single 280-character post while still conveying the tone, mood, and point of the stanza.
  • Once the entire poem has been rewritten as a series of tweets, students should create two hashtags to accompany the posts. The hashtags should relate to either the theme, title, or author of the poem.

Analyze Song Lyrics

Teenagers live by their soundtracks, maybe even more than they did in previous generations. Incorporating this love for music into a lesson about comprehension and writing can be pretty powerful. Students will need to interpret the meaning behind song lyrics, specifically if there is one controversial message that stands out.

Ask each student to choose a favorite song and submit it ahead of time. Check lyrics for availability and appropriateness before approving students' song choice.

  • Present each student with a copy of the lyrics for their chosen song.
  • Ask each student to write a literary analysis essay using the chosen song.
  • As an added learning experience, you could ask students to present their song and analysis to the class.

Activities to Focus on Words and Their Meanings

Vocabulary lessons can be incredibly dull and boring when they involve memorizing lists and reciting them back to the teacher. The thing is, being familiar with an extensive vocabulary can help students sound more professional in adult settings. These fun activities can help.

Beach Ball Vocab Lesson

Active lessons are awesome when you need to gain and keep the attention of teenagers. This age group is best suited for an active in-class game because they should be able to keep on task while having fun.

  • Use a permanent marker to create distinct sections on a beach ball, create as few or many as needed.
  • In each section, write a command dealing with the use of a vocabulary word. Some examples would be: change to an adverb, define the word, use it in a sentence, think of a rhyming word, and think of another word with the same root.

How to Play:

  • Instruct students to sit on their desks or have all the desks arranged in a circle before game play.
  • Write a vocabulary word on the white board, call out a student's name, and throw them the ball.
  • The student should then shout the answer to whichever prompt is closest to their left thumb as it pertains to the word on the board.
  • If the student answers correctly, the teacher should choose a new vocab word before the student calls out a classmate's name and throws the ball to that person. If the student answers incorrectly, the same vocab word is used and the ball is thrown to the next player.
  • Continue game play until all vocabulary words have been used or time is up.

Comic Strip Scene

Comic strips offer a place to showcase an entire story in very few words (plus their just really fun). This activity will require students to tap into their creativity and vocabulary skills in rewriting a scene from a play.

  • Scenes from a play
  • Blank paper
  • Colored pencils or markers
  • Assign a scene from a play to each student.
  • Instruct students to create a comic strip inspired by this scene. The purpose of the comic should mirror that of the scene, but the tone should be humorous as that is typically how comic strips are written. The basic idea is to capture the essence of the scene in images and only a few choice words. No text from the scene should be copied in the comic aside from character and location names.
  • Display and discuss the comic strips as a class. What were some of the most effective ways a particular scene was portrayed?

Best Websites for High School Students

By Med Kharbach, PhD | Last Update: February 16, 2024

Websites for High School Students

In today’s fast-paced educational landscape, high school students have an unprecedented access to a wealth of knowledge right at their fingertips. Recognizing the immense potential of digital resources to supplement traditional learning, I’ve dedicated myself to meticulously combing through the vast expanse of educational technology websites.

My goal? To curate a selection that offers substantial learning value specifically tailored for high school students. Drawing from my extensive experience in reviewing EdTech tools, I present to you a compilation that not only enhances the academic journey but also inspires a deeper engagement with the material. These websites span a broad spectrum of disciplines, ensuring that students can find reliable, enriching resources regardless of their area of interest.

Websites for High School Students

Here are some good websites for high school students:

The library of Congress

The Library of Congress, home of U.S. Copyright Office, offers a wide range of educational materials and primary source documents including books, recordings, images, manuscripts, maps, and newspapers. 

The mission of the Library is to “to develop qualitatively the Library’s universal collections, which document the history and further the creativity of the American people and which record and contribute to the advancement of civilization and knowledge throughout the world, and to acquire, organize, provide access to, maintain, secure, and preserve these collections.”

The Smithsonian Learning Lab

The Smithsonian Learning Lab offers a diverse collection of resources to help students enhance their learning. These materials include recordings, digital images, texts, art and culture, and more. 

The Lab also provides tools that students can use to upload, adapt, create, and share educational resources with colleagues, teachers, and parents. Students can use the Lab’s search service to search for resources to use in their own learning projects. 

Google Arts and Culture

Google Arts & Culture is another great website for high school students. It provides students access to a huge repository of human knowledge stored in over 2000 cultural institutions from all over the world.

Students can use Google Arts & Culture to take virtual guided tours to different museums and exhibits in the world. They can also search for museums and exhibitions in their vicinity and explore their artwork. 

Other features provided by Google Arts & Culture include games to teach students cultural literacy , museum explorer to explore world museums, today in history featuring major art and cultural events and historical figures, Street View to help you tour famous sites and landmarks, discover artists from all around the world, and many more.

Applied Digital Skills

Applied Digital Skills by Google for Education offers a wide variety of educational resources to help students develop the skills necessary for thriving in and out of school. The site embeds video-based lessons that students can access anytime anywhere for free. 

The way it works is simple: students sign in as learners, once in their dashboard they can then start searching for lessons and begin their learning journey. 

There are over 100 lessons organized into different collections. Students can search for lessons by audience (e.g., late elementary, middle school, high school, adult learners), by digital tool (e.g., Apps Script, Docs, Drawings, Drive, Forms, Gmail, Maps, Meet, AutoDraw, Photos, etc) or by topic (e.g., Art, Business, Math, Science, Social Studies, Study Skills and Organization,  Foreign Language, Financial skills, communication, etc). 

BrainPOP offers a wide variety of educational games, animated videos and activities to enhance students learning and help them develop a better understanding of the world around them. 

BrainPOP’s  materials cover different topics and content areas including science, health, reading and writing, social studies, math, arts and technology. BrainPOP also provides tools ‘that challenge students to reflect, make connections, and engage in deeper, curiosity-driven learning’.

Besides the main BrainPOP, there is also BrainPOP Jr for kids K-3 and offers learning resources that cover STEM, social studies, reading/writing, health, and arts. BrainPOP ELL is for English language learning for students of all ages. It offers educational materials on vocabulary, grammar, listening, reading, and writing.

Prodigy is a free, adaptive math game that integrates Common Core math (1st-7th grade) into a fantasy style game that students absolutely love playing. Prodigy takes game-based learning a step further and provides teachers with a powerful set of reporting and assessment tools that allow them to easily identify trouble spots, differentiate instruction, and better manage classroom time.

Khan Academy

Khan Academy provides students access to a huge library of educational resources that include videos, interactive exercises, in-depth articles covering various content areas such as Math, science, economics, history, finance, and civics. Students can browse lessons by grade and topic.

Each lesson comes with video tutorials and step by step guides. There are also ‘practice exercises, quizzes, and tests with instant feedback and step-by-step hints’. More importantly, Khan Academy uses advanced algorithms to provide relevant learning materials tailored to each learner’s individual levels and skills. 

Brainly is knowledge-sharing platform where students get help with their homework. Brainly resources are crowd-source and students. Answers to students inquiries are provided by members of the site’s community including fellow students, teachers, educators, PhDs, experts, among others. 

Topics covered include Math, History, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Social Studies, Geography, Arts, Computer Science, Business, Law, Engineering, World Languages, Health and many more. For more similar sources check out best homework websites for students .

Math Homework Tools

This is a collection of some of the best tools to help students with their homework. Students can use them to seek help with their math problems and learn from their peers and tutors. 

Using these tools and calculators, students will be able to access step by step explanations of complex math concepts related to various math topics including algebra, trigonometry, geometry, calculus, statistics, and many more. Also, these tools work both on desktop and mobile devices enabling students sync their learning experiences across different platforms.

Final thoughts

In conclusion, as we navigate the ever-evolving realm of educational technology, it’s crucial to remember the core purpose of these resources: to enrich and support the learning journey of high school students. This collection represents just a starting point, a springboard into the vast ocean of knowledge that digital education offers. Whether it’s exploring the rich archives of the Library of Congress, embarking on virtual tours with Google Arts and Culture, or tackling math challenges on Prodigy, these websites are gateways to discovery and growth. I encourage students and educators to delve into these resources, experiment with them in and out of the classroom, and continue to share insights and recommendations.

word project for high school students

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word project for high school students

Meet Med Kharbach, PhD

Dr. Med Kharbach is an influential voice in the global educational technology landscape, with an extensive background in educational studies and a decade-long experience as a K-12 teacher. Holding a Ph.D. from Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Canada, he brings a unique perspective to the educational world by integrating his profound academic knowledge with his hands-on teaching experience. Dr. Kharbach's academic pursuits encompass curriculum studies, discourse analysis, language learning/teaching, language and identity, emerging literacies, educational technology, and research methodologies. His work has been presented at numerous national and international conferences and published in various esteemed academic journals.

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word project for high school students

20 Microsoft Word Activities for Middle School Students

  • Middle School Education

word project for high school students

1. Introduction to Microsoft Word: Begin by teaching students the basics of opening and closing documents, along with formatting text and paragraphs. This will give them a solid foundation for using Word in the future.

2. Font Exploration: Allow students to experiment with different fonts, sizes, and colors to create unique and eye-catching designs.

3. Personal Biography: Students can write a brief personal biography or autobiography, practicing their formatting skills, such as headers, bullet points, and indentation.

4. Themed Brochure: Students create a brochure for a fictitious event or destination utilizing images, text boxes, and different formatting options.

5. Creating Tables: Teach students to create tables in Word for organizing data or creating simple charts.

6. Collaborative Storytelling: Assign groups of students to create a shared story using Word’s collaboration feature, adding a sentence or paragraph one at a time.

7. Label Making: Instruct students to design their own labels or stickers using Word’s template library.

8. Interview Questions: Have students create a list of questions for an imaginary interview with their favorite celebrity, then format the document professionally.

9. Newspaper Article Writing: Students write a short newspaper-style article about an event occurring at their school or community.

10. Creative Book Cover Design: Using Word’s formatting tools and images from various sources, students design their own book covers inspired by their favorite stories.

11. Recipe Cards: Students type up and format a family recipe on card-sized documents that can be printed out later in class.

12. Class Newsletter: Assign different sections to groups of students who collaborate on creating a monthly class newsletter using Word templates and features like columns and page breaks.

13. Letter Writing: Teach students the proper format for writing personal letters or business correspondence while using Word’s various font choices and layout options.

14. Poetry Anthology: Have each student type up one of their own poems and combine them all into a professionally formatted anthology using Word.

15. Infographic Creation: Encourage students to create visually appealing infographics with Word’s Shapes, Clip Art, and SmartArt tools.

16. Market Research Survey: Students develop a survey in Word, utilizing tables or checkboxes for data gathering.

17. Reading Log: Have students create and maintain a reading log, documenting the books they’ve read and their thoughts or ratings.

18. Vocabulary Lists: Students can practice new vocabulary by creating weekly word lists complete with definitions, part of speech, and an example sentence.

19. Creating Forms: Teach students how to create fillable forms within Word, incorporating checkboxes, text boxes, drop-down lists, and more.

20. Resume and Cover Letter Tutorial: Provide students with guidance on crafting a resume and cover letter using Microsoft Word templates while cultivating valuable career skills for the future.

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Middle Tennessee student says she dealt with racism, was called 'monkey' in school

by Justin McFarland

Middle Tennessee student says she was called the n-word, monkey in school (Photo: Williamson County School Board)

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, Tenn. (WZTV) — Some heavy allegations of racism are coming out of one Middle Tennessee high school.

Two Midstate parents say their high school daughter was called a monkey and the n-word at Independence High School in Thompson's Station.

The parents told school officials during a Williamson County Board of Education meeting the particular boy who made those name calls also made those threats he would shoot all the Blacks within the Williamson County school.

Although the student has been removed from his daughter's class, they want them removed from the school.

Parents Dorita Jones and Herbert Reed are now asking the Williamson County School board to take action.

"A student called our youngest a monkey, and made monkey gestures..." the father Herbert Reed said. "It's personal, and it could be your kids, any of our kids. If you had a threat, what would you do?"

Williamson County Schools Director Dr. Jason Golden said student safety is something the board continues to work on.

"We have worked hard on student safety in relation to each other and their teachers," Williamson County Schools Director Dr. Jason Golden says. "And we are thoughtfully working on improving how we respond."

Dorita Jones, mother of the student, also spoke to the board.

"A classmate lashed out at [her], called her the n-word," Jones said. "She was shocked and she told him that he was not supposed to say that and that was inappropriate. The classmate came back and called her the n-word again and said 'F you' and that he would shoot all the Blacks."

The student also said right after the other student had said those things, she went directly to the principal.

"I was just like really scared," the student said. "I am still scared to this day to go to that school."

Dr. Golden said he appreciated the family speaking out because it is stories like this that helps the board ensure students' safety.

To watch the Williamson County Board of Education meeting, see below.

Get reports like this and all the news of the day in Middle Tennessee delivered to your inbox each morning with the FOX 17 News Daily Newsletter.

word project for high school students

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Canadian teacher accused of selling students’ art on personal website

Parents in disbelief after students at Montreal’s Westwood junior high found their art for purchase on mugs, phone cases and clothes

A Canadian teacher is under fire for allegedly using his personal website to sell nearly 100 pieces of art created by students, prompting disbelief and anger from parents.

Students at Montreal’s Westwood junior high school made the chance discovery last night after searching out their art teacher’s website. On it they found their own art, available for purchase on coffee mugs, mobile phone cases and clothing.

“Imagine your 13 year-old son coming home from school today with a story that his art teacher is selling students’ artwork online at $94 per drawing without their prior knowledge!? That is completely insane,” parent Joel DeBellefeuille posted on social media . “I’m sure I’m not the only parent that wants answers.”

The teacher, identified as Mario Perron by CTV News, did not respond to the Guardian’s request for comment. On his website, the Montreal resident describes himself as a “life-long student of art” whose works appear in private collections in Canada, the US, Spain and Italy.

More than 90 works are still visible on the site , with the titles of many works – Julia’s Creepy Portrait, Charlotte’s Creepy Portrait – apparently referring to the names of students who created the art. As of Monday, the links to the art instead route to Perron’s paintings and the student art can no longer be purchased. Other social media accounts linked to Perron’s art have been taken down, including pages on Instagram and Facebook.

“I’m extremely disgusted with this person. It’s extremely, you know, it’s unbelievable,” Michael Bennett, who found work from both his daughters for sale, told CTV News. “Is [Perron] asking for these types of portraits to be done so it meets the market? I’m not quite sure on that aspect. However, I am not impressed at all with this person. I’m not impressed with the school, or the school board … [My daughters] feel cheated.”

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The school board said in a statement it was “aware of the situation and is taking these allegations very seriously”, adding an investigation was “underway” and the board would not comment.

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A Call To Action: Cañon City High School…

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A call to action: cañon city high school students raise drunk-driving awareness through capstone project.

Canon City High School juniors Sierra Rodriguez and Ariana Lopez...

Canon City High School juniors Sierra Rodriguez and Ariana Lopez smile for a photo alongside sophomore Joshua Barker at the CCHS sign on College Avenue. Together, the three students are working to educate the community about the dangers of drunk driving through their collective capstone project. (Courtesy photo/Special to the Daily Record)

As part of the trio's fundraising efforts to bring renowned...

As part of the trio's fundraising efforts to bring renowned drunk-driving speaker Cara Filler to Fremont County, they hosted a Navajo Taco fundraiser earlier this year. Several more fundraisers will be held before Filler visits on March 20. (Courtesy photo/Special to the Daily Record)

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Ever since 2021, the students at Cañon City High School have touched the community in a variety of ways via the capstone projects.

The capstone project is designed to be a kind of compliment to the internship course that occurs either alongside it or beforehand. The true strength of the capstone project lies in the student’s ability and power to choose exactly what they want the capstone to accomplish and focus on. There are no boundaries on what a student can choose.

Though the projects are now mandatory for graduation, they also go a long way in bonding students not only with members of the community but also will possible career paths in the future.

For CCHS juniors Ariana Lopez and Sierra Rodriguez and sophomore Joshua Barker, the capstone project became a personal challenge to tackle a nationwide calamity: drunk driving.

“It’s amazing to see young people impact our community in such a way because it doesn’t happen often,” said Public Health Educator Michelle Boscia.

Originally, Lopez and Rodriguez began working on the capstone in their sophomore years and had hoped to pursue a project that revolved around dance. When they realized that dance appealed to a narrow, niche audience, they decided to widen the scope of the project and subsequently brought Barker into the ring in late 2023.

Together, they began working with Boscia and Fremont County Department of Public Health’s Program Coordinator Pamela Hamby to organize the scope of the project.

Hamby, who suffered the loss of her daughter, Brieonna Sanders-Samora, in 2021 because of a drunk-driving accident, was more than happy to help get the project off the ground.

“It’s great having these kids reach out, it means they know that there is a problem and they’re reaching out trying to make it better,” Hamby said. “I think that’s where we need to hit — our younger population.”

After sifting through a long list of potential speakers to address Fremont County students about the spoken and unspoken truths of drunk driving, they finally settled on a candidate: Cara Filler.

“We just thought that her story was really inspiring,” Rodriguez said. “We looked on her website and she’s been doing this for over 30 years now.”

Filler is an author, entrepreneur, and one of North America’s leading youth motivational speakers on peer pressure, risk-taking, and traffic safety, and the trio hopes that her personal story of losing her twin sister the day after their 18th birthday in a motor vehicle collision will have an impact on local youth.

Filler will be in Fremont County at CCHS at 11 a.m. and Florence Junior Senior High School at 2:30 p.m. March 20. The three don’t want to keep Filler and her knowledge strictly relegated to the confines of Cañon City.

“We feel that a lot of people are aware of the problem, but it’s something that we feel a lot of people never think will happen to them,” Rodriguez said.

Like many in Cañon City, the three mourned the loss of fellow students to a drunk-driving accident in 2022 and hope that Filler can help prevent similar accidents by educating high school-aged students.

However, such expertise does not necessarily come cheap and the trio has been working hard to organize a variety of fundraisers to raise the money necessary to bring Filler to Fremont County.

On Jan. 20, they held a Navajo Taco fundraiser, which served to nicely kick off their fundraising efforts but they still have a lot of work to do to reach the $4,550 goal.

In the coming weeks, they plan to hold a bake sale, silent auction, and possibly even a raffle.

However, they aren’t just relying on fundraising efforts to reach their goal. Local businesses, such as Cañon City MUGS, Big Burger World, China Garden, Cañon City Lanes, Fremont County Department of Public Health, Myra Smallwood, and El Caporal have already donated to the cause and both family and friends have done what they can to support the noble cause.

They have also set up donation buckets around Cañon City, including the following locations:

  • World’s End Brewery
  • Sunflower Bank
  • American Liquor
  • The Bridge Youth Center
  • Maddalenas Salon
  • Gift Chateau
  • First Choice Fitness

Even when the $4,550 benchmark is met, the three don’t plan to eliminate fundraising efforts and donate any spillover funds to an organization, such as MADD or SADD.

Additionally, the three have decided that instead of bringing a speaker in to inspire the students in a single day, following up with those students is of paramount importance.

“We wanted to follow up with students and whoever is at the event as well just to see how it impacted them and see how we can help with that moving forward,” Lopez said.

Though the details of the survey that is to be dispersed to those in attendance are still being ironed out, the three know that they plan to learn about the strengths and weaknesses of drunk driving education using their peers.

To donate to the Drunk Driving Awareness Capstone project organized by the three students, visit their GoFundMe site at https://www.gofundme.com/f/drunk-driving-awareness-capstone or contact Lopez at 719-406-7232 or [email protected].

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Preview of Word Puzzles Brain Teasers - Fun Logic Activity - Word Sense Brain Break Game

Word Puzzles Brain Teasers - Fun Logic Activity - Word Sense Brain Break Game

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THREE OF A KIND VOL. 1 – Bell-Ringer Word Game , Class Warm-Up, Sponge, Fun Stuff

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Peg Articulation Game Middle School High School Speech Therapy BOOM CARDS™

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Root Word Sneak: A Super Fun Word Game to Review Greek and Latin Root Words!

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word project for high school students

Christmas Games for Middle & High School Language Arts Challenging & Fun CCSS

word project for high school students

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Theme: 4 Pics 1 Word Powerpoint Game

word project for high school students

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Fairview High School art students spruce up crossing guard booths

  • Updated: Feb. 21, 2024, 10:47 a.m. |
  • Published: Feb. 21, 2024, 8:00 a.m.

Crossing guard booths are located on Lorain Road and West 220th St. in Fairview Park

Crossing guard booths are located on Lorain Road and West 220th Street in Fairview Park. John Benson/cleveland.com

  • John Benson, special to cleveland.com

FAIRVIEW PARK, Ohio -- Teenage artists recently completed designs for the exteriors of a handful of crossing guard booths located throughout the city.

“The community has always been supportive of promoting the arts, so we wanted to look for ways that we could incorporate this upbuilding message and theme,” said Fairview High School art teacher Ryan Graff, who oversaw the project.

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