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A whole 83.8 per cent of the pupils participating in a homework-free school pilot project reported that they got bored with school because of the homework. More than half of the parents preferred an arrangement of an extended school day and no homework.

Is homework useful or necessary?

An updated norwegian education act is currently being considered. several researchers are sceptical about the benefits of homework..

We are used to homework being part of a school’s learning programme, but homework is not mandated by the state and is only one of several options that schools have.

The Education Act currently includes no clear authorisation for assigning homework. It is therefore up to individual municipalities, schools and teachers whether they want to use homework as part of the educational scheme.

The Norwegian Ministry of Education believes that the new Education Act should specify that an individual school can require students to do assignments and homework outside of school hours.

Researchers and teachers in the field of pedagogy in the university and college sector met to discuss and submit their response to the proposed new Education Act:

“We wonder what knowledge the Ministry has based its statement on. A decision authorising homework would be a serious setback for the development of homework-free/homework-aware schools and especially for researching the topic.”

More about their input is included later in this article.

Changed opinion about homework usefulness

Opinions about homework in school vary widely, and more research is needed on the effect that homework has on learning. A research project at NTNU on homework-free schools has captured interesting results.

Per Egil Mjaavatn is a researcher and associate professor affiliated with NTNU. He previously supported homework as a positive tool for the learning outcomes of children and adolescents. During the course of the research project, he changed his mind.

Per Egil Mjaavatn is a researcher and associate professor affiliated with NTNU.

Need more knowledge

The city council in Trondheim wanted to try out a homework-free project in some of the city’s elementary schools in order to gain experience with a different way of working in schools. NTNU’s Department of Education and Lifelong Learning was asked to evaluate the experiment.

The purpose of the project was to improve the knowledge base about attitudes towards, and experiences with homework in primary school – and about the effects of homework.

Although the homework-free project had to be scaled back and eventually discontinued due to the COVID pandemic, the researchers made several interesting discoveries.

In the 2019/2020 school year, Flatåsen and Stabbursmoen schools were homework-free with two extra school hours a week, while Byåsen and Romulslia schools were homework-free with no change in the timetable.

All four schools were in Trondheim municipality. Four control schools that gave traditional homework assignments as well as homework help at school were also involved in the trial project. Pupils in 5th through 7th grade participated.

Homework-free option reduced family conflicts

90 per cent of the children in schools with no homework experienced having more time to spend with family and friends. They also found that the level of conflict at home was less, as did more than half of the parents.

Excerpt from homework notebook.

The parent of a child in a homework-free school with an extended school day said: “Fewer conflicts around homework, no need to fuss and follow up on whether homework was done. Better atmosphere in the home."

Another parent said: “Good for the family, but little control over my child’s development."

The parent of a child in a homework-free school with no timetable changes said: “There was less arguing about homework and when it had to be done. But I also think that the school hours should be extended if the no-homework policy continues next year."

Does homework promote or inhibit motivation?

A lot of students are tired of homework. A whopping 83.8 per cent of the pupils who took part in the trial project responded that they get bored with school because of homework.

Fewer than half the teachers believed that homework helps make pupils more interested in their schoolwork. The majority of parents (79 per cent) and teachers (89 per cent) believed that giving pupils homework is primarily dictated by tradition in Norwegian schools.

Some parents reported in their comments that pupils became more motivated about school and performed better during the homework-free period. Other parents said the opposite: the lack of homework made pupil motivation and performance worse.

Parents with an immigrant background were more positive about homework than the general parent average.

Girls missed homework

Only 28 per cent of the pupils in the homework-free schools believed that homework is necessary for them to learn everything that is expected of them. 20 per cent responded that they missed homework, and especially the girls at the homework-free schools missed having homework.

In the control schools with traditional homework, 70 per cent of the pupils would prefer not to have homework, yet 74.5 per cent of these pupils agreed with the statement that homework is necessary for learning.

Mathematics seems to be in a special position: a clear majority in all three informant groups believed that mathematics homework is necessary to get enough problem-solving practice.

Parents and teachers prefer different solutions

More than half of the parents would like to have an arrangement of an extended school day and no homework. Such a solution would satisfy both their desire for no homework and less homework stress at home.

A clear majority of the teachers preferred an ordinary school day with homework.

A pupil at a homework-free school with an extended school day said: "Not having homework was great. I'd rather be at school longer than have problems with homework at home."

Does homework contribute to increased inequality?

One task of schools is to reduce social differences in society. A clear majority of parents (75 per cent) believed that homework leads to greater differences between children of parents with different educational backgrounds.

The teachers disagreed with the parents in this regard. Only 39 per cent of the teachers believed that homework contributes to increased differences between children with different socio-economic backgrounds.

Homework should be a repetition of familiar material. Nevertheless, 95 per cent of the pupils answered that they got help at home to do their homework in Norwegian and mathematics.

“In other words, students aren’t able to do a lot of the homework that’s being assigned on their own, which seems demotivating. The pupils who had homework were less interested in these subjects than the pupils who didn’t have homework,” Mjaavatn says.

75 per cent of parents said they had to help their children with homework.

“Parents have different levels of preparation for helping their children with homework, and this can result in different learning conditions for children,” Mjaavatn says.

A majority of parents believed that homework also leads to greater differences between students’ academic levels.

Here too, the parent responses differed from those of the teachers. Only a third of the teachers shared the parents’ opinion.

How much time should children spend on homework?

Parents expect more homework with increasing age. The parents’ responses differed significantly here, with fathers wanting more time per week for homework than mothers.

Teachers’ homework expectations were slightly higher than those of parents in terms of what they perceive to be an appropriate amount of time spent on homework in a normal school week.

On average, the teachers suggested 3.27 hours per week for 5th graders and 3.55 hours for 7th graders.

Responses scattered

The researchers write in their report that they do not have measures of the impact that can show whether the homework-free project had an effect on the pupils’ effort and learning.

“But we’ve gained an understanding of the opinions held by pupils, parents and teachers on this issue. The answers vary widely, and we’ve concluded that the question of whether homework promotes learning and motivation depends on whom you ask.”

Elisabeth Rønningen is a senior lecturer in pedagogy at NTNU.

New Education Act

Now, back to the new Norwegian Education Act, which is out for review. Just over 30 pedagogical researchers and teachers in the university and college sector have gathered to craft a response relating to homework in particular.

“The answer to the question of whether homework is useful and necessary depends on who is given it and for what purpose. Whose perspectives are taken into account when issues relating to homework are formulated? Homework is a complex phenomenon that involves a lot of different players,” Elisabeth Rønningen at NTNU says. She is one of the authors of the text.

How teachers justify their views on homework

A qualitative study that examined how and why teachers give homework in elementary school showed that teachers justify homework by saying that:

  • homework provides more learning.
  • pupils should make the learning their own.
  • homework helps students develop good work habits.
  • homework is a good way to collaborate with children’s homes.
  • schools depend on parent participation to meet all the competency targets.
  • homework gives students time and peace to reflect on, repeat and automate their basic skills.

Thin knowledge base

The problem is that the knowledge base for these justifications is very thin, the researchers write in their response. For example, research shows no clear connection between homework and learning.

Australian school researcher John Hattie refers to 161 studies which conclude that homework has little or no effect on learning, least of all in primary school.

The literature review on homework research from the Norwegian Directorate of Education and Training (2021) includes no reference to studies that can document a strong connection between homework and pupils’ learning.

The review states that Norway showed no significant correlation between the time pupils spend on homework and their results in mathematics, according to the PISA survey.

Homework can lead to poor work habits

Nor does the research show any clear connection between homework and the development of good work habits in pupils. In Harris Cooper and colleagues' research summary, they found that homework can lead to developing bad work habits just as well as good ones.

Homework can lead to rushing assignments, doing tasks with little commitment and care, copying from the internet or getting others to do the tasks for them.

Should all learning happen at school or is homework important, too?

Stress and conflict-filled family relationships

In the experts' response, they argue that there needs to be a clear connection between homework and the development of good work habits if it is to be used as an argument for the Education Act to authorise schools to be able to require pupils to do school work after school hours.

The practice of giving homework assignments can be counterproductive . Holte’s research from 2016 showed that homework can contribute to destroying close and positive relationships between parents and children, because homework can lead to increased stress levels and conflict-filled relationships at home.

In their response, the researchers and teachers propose that the wording of the new law be changed to:

The school cannot require pupils to do assignments outside of school hours (homework).

A formulation like this sets a clear boundary against a teaching practice for which no good evidence exists and which can have very negative consequences both at an individual and societal level. This formulation is most in line with what we know today, they write

Read the full consultation response here (link in Norwegian).

Harris Cooper et al. 'Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement? A Synthesis of Research, 1987–2003', Review of Educational Research , 2006. Abstract.

K.L. Holte. Homework in Primary School: Could It Be Made More Child-Friendly? Studia paedagogica: Childhood , 2017.

homework in norway

This article/press release is paid for and presented by NTNU

This content is created by NTNU's communication staff, who use this platform to communicate science and share results from research with the public. NTNU is one of more than 80 owners of ScienceNorway.no. Read more here .

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homework in norway

How useful or necessary is homework?

This topic is one of several addressed in an updated Norwegian Education Act that is currently out for comments. Several researchers are sceptical about the benefits of homework.

We are used to homework being part of a school’s learning programme, but homework is not mandated by the state and is only one of several options that schools have.

The Education Act currently includes no clear authorization that provides for assigning homework. It is therefore up to individual municipalities, schools and teachers whether they want to use homework as part of the educational scheme.

The Norwegian Ministry of Education believes that the new Education Act should specify that an individual school can require students to do assignments and homework outside of school hours.

University and college sector researchers and teachers in the field of pedagogy met to discuss and submit their comment response to the proposed new Education Act.

They stated, “We wonder what knowledge basis the Ministry is referring to with this statement. A decision authorizing homework would be a serious setback for the development of homework-free/homework-aware schools and especially for researching the topic.”

More about their input is included later in this article.

Changed opinion about homework usefulness

Opinions about homework in school vary widely, and more study is needed on the effect that homework has on learning. A research project at NTNU on homework-free schools has captured interesting results.

Photo of Per Egil Mjaavatn

Photo: Elin Iversen/ NTNU SHOW MORE

Per Egil Mjaavatn (pictured) is a researcher and associate professor affiliated with NTNU. He previously supported homework as a positive tool for the learning outcomes of children and youth. During the course of the research project, he changed his mind.

Mjaavatn wrote the final report as part of the group at NTNU that evaluated a homework-free project in Trondheim.

Need more knowledge

The city council in Trondheim wanted to try out a homework-free project in some of the city’s elementary schools in order to gain experience with a different way of working in schools. NTNU’s Department of Education and Lifelong Learning was asked to evaluate the experiment.

The purpose of the project was to improve the knowledge base about attitudes towards and experiences with homework in primary school – and about the effects of homework.

Although the homework-free project had to be scaled back and eventually discontinued due to the COVID pandemic, the researchers made several interesting discoveries.

In the 2019/2020 school year, Flatåsen and Stabbursmoen schools were homework-free with two extra school hours a week, while Byåsen and Romulslia schools were homework-free with no change in the timetable. All four schools were in Trondheim municipality. Four control schools that gave traditional homework assignments as well as homework help at school were also involved in the trial project. Pupils in 5 th through 7th grade participated.

Homework-free option reduced family conflicts

Ninety per cent of the children in the schools with no homework experienced having more time to spend with family and friends. They also found that the level of conflict at home was less, as did more than half of the parents.

“Fewer conflicts around homework, no need to fuss and follow up on whether homework was done. Better atmosphere in the home” (parent of child in homework-free school with an extended school day).

“Good for the family, but little control over my child’s development” (parent of child in a homework-free school with an extended school day).

“There was less arguing about homework and when it had to be done. But I also think that the school hours should be extended if the no-homework policy continues next year” (parent of child in a homework-free school).

Does homework promote or inhibit motivation?

Photo shows excerpt from homework notebook.

Excerpt from homework notebook. Photo: Idun Haugan/NTNU SHOW MORE

A lot of students are tired of homework. A whopping 83.8 per cent of the pupils who took part in the trial project responded that they get bored with school because of the homework.

Fewer than half the teachers believed that homework helps make pupils more interested in their schoolwork. The majority of parents (79 per cent) and teachers (89 per cent) believed that giving pupils homework is primarily dictated by tradition in Norwegian schools.

Some parents reported in their comments that pupils became more motivated about school and performed better during the homework-free period. Other parents said the opposite: the lack of homework made pupil motivation and performance worse.

Parents with an immigrant background were more positive about homework than the parent average.

Girls missed homework

Only 28 per cent of the pupils in the homework-free schools believed that homework is necessary for them to learn everything that is expected of them. Twenty per cent responded that they missed homework, and especially the girls at the homework-free schools missed having homework.

In the control schools with traditional homework, 70 per cent of the pupils would prefer not to have homework, yet 74.5 per cent of these pupils agreed with the statement that homework is necessary for learning.

Mathematics seems to be in a special position: a clear majority in all three informant groups believed that mathematics homework is necessary to get enough problem-solving practice.

Parents and teachers prefer different solutions

More than half of the parents would like to have an arrangement with an extended school day and no homework. Such a solution would satisfy both their desire for no homework and less homework stress at home.

A clear majority of the teachers preferred an ordinary school day with homework.

“Homework-free was great. I’d rather be at school longer than have problems with homework at home” (pupil at a homework-free school with an extended school day).

Does homework contribute to increased inequality?

One task of schools is to reduce social differences in society. A clear majority of parents (75 per cent) believed that homework leads to greater differences between children of parents with different educational backgrounds.

The teachers disagreed with the parents in this regard. Only 39 per cent of the teachers believed that homework contributes to increased differences between children with different socio-economic backgrounds.

Homework should be a repetition of familiar material. Nevertheless, 95 per cent of the pupils answered that they got help at home to do their homework in Norwegian and mathematics.

“In other words, students aren’t able to do a lot of the homework that’s being assigned on their own, which seems demotivating. The pupils who had homework were less interested in these subjects than the pupils who didn’t have homework,” says Mjaavatn.

Seventy-five per cent of parents said they had to help their children with homework.

“Parents have different levels of preparation for helping their children with homework, and this can result in different learning conditions for children,” says Mjaavatn.

A majority of parents believed that homework also leads to greater differences between students’ academic levels.

Here too, the parent responses differed from those of the teachers. Only a third of the teachers shared the parents’ opinion.

How much time should children spend on homework?

Parents expect more homework with increasing age. The parents’ responses differed significantly here, with fathers wanting more time per week for homework than mothers.

Teachers’ homework expectations were slightly higher than those of parents in terms of what they perceive to be an appropriate amount of time spent on homework in a normal school week. On average, the teachers suggested 3.27 hours per week for 5th graders and 3.55 hours for 7th graders.

Responses scattered

The researchers write in their report that they do not have impact measures that can show whether the homework-free project had an effect on the pupils’ effort and learning.

“But we’ve gained an understanding of the opinions held by pupils, parents and teachers on this issue. The answers vary widely, and we’ve concluded that the question of whether homework promotes learning and motivation depends on whom you ask.”

The research group consisted of Professor Per Frostad, Associate Professor Jan Arvid Haugan, Professor Vegard Johansen and Associate Professor Per Egil Mjaavatn

The full evaluative report is available in Norwegian: Report no. 3 Final report 10.03.21

Wrong kind of homework causes problems

“The main problem with homework is that far too little thought is given to what the homework should be and what its purpose is. Pupils are often assigned homework that they don’t have the prerequisite skills for, and then the payoff tends to be meagre. That’s often the cause of problems at home,” according to Thomas Dahl, a professor in NTNU’s Programme for Teacher Education, in a previous Gemini article.

“Homework is not an important topic in most teacher education programmes, either. Education students receive little instruction in how to use homework in an effective way,” says Dahl.

  • You might like to read (in Norwegian): Feil type lekser skaper problemer

New Education Act

Now, back to the new Norwegian Education Act, which is out for consultation. Just over 30 pedagogical researchers and teachers in the university and college sector have gathered to craft a response relating to homework in particular.

Photo of Elisabeth Rønningen.

“The answer to the question of whether homework is useful and necessary depends on who is to do it and for what purpose. Whose perspectives are taken into account when issues relating to homework are formulated? Homework is a complex phenomenon that involves a lot of different actors,” says Elisabeth Rønningen (pictured) at NTNU.

Here are excerpts from the researchers’ and teachers’ consultation response:

How teachers justify their views on homework

A qualitative study that examined how and why teachers give homework in elementary school showed that teachers justify homework by saying that:

  • homework provides more learning.
  • pupils should make the learning their own.
  • homework helps students develop good work habits.
  • homework is a good way to collaborate with children’s homes.
  • schools depend on parent participation to meet all the competency targets.
  • homework gives students time and peace to reflect on, repeat and automate their basic skills.

Thin knowledge base

The problem is that the knowledge base for these justifications is very thin, write the researchers in their consultation response. For example, research shows no clear connection between homework and learning.

Australian school researcher John Hattie refers to 161 studies which conclude that homework has little or no effect on learning, least of all in primary school.

The literature review on homework research from the Norwegian Directorate of Education and Training (UDIR, 2021) includes no reference to studies that can document a strong connection between homework and pupils’ learning. The review states that Norway showed no significant correlation between the time pupils spend on homework and their results in mathematics, according to the PISA survey.

Homework can lead to poor work habits

Nor does the research show any clear connection between homework and the development of good work habits in pupils. Harris Cooper et al. shows in his research summary that homework can lead to developing bad work habits just as well as good ones in pupils.

Homework can lead to rushing assignments, doing tasks with little commitment and care, copying from the internet or getting others to do the tasks for them.

Reference: Cooper, H., Robinson, J., & Patall, E. (2006). Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement? A Synthesis of Research , 1987–2003. Review of Educational Research.

Stress and conflict-filled family relationships

In the comment response from the pedagogical researchers and teachers, a knowledge base is therefore called for that clearly shows a connection between homework and the development of good work habits if it is to be used as an argument for the Education Act to authorize schools to be able to require pupils to do school work after school hours.

The practice of giving homework assignments can be counterproductive. Holte’s research from 2016 showed that homework can contribute to destroying positive and close relationships between parents and children, because homework can lead to increased stress levels and conflict-filled relationships at home.

Reference: Homework in Primary school: Could it be made more child-friendly?

In their comment response, the researchers and teachers propose that the wording of the new law be changed to:

The school cannot require pupils to do assignments outside of school hours (homework).

A formulation like this sets a clear boundary against a teaching practice for which no good knowledge base exists and which can have very negative consequences both at an individual and societal level. This formulation is most in line with the knowledge base we have today, the researchers write.

Read the full consultation response by pedagogical researchers and teachers (in Norwegian).

homework in norway

Should all learning happen at school or is homework important, too? Photo: Elin Iversen/NTNU SHOW MORE

Watch a video that summarizes the  article :

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Primary and lower secondary school in Norway

children in classroom

Right to a place in a Norwegian primary or lower secondary school

Primary and lower secondary education in Norway is compulsory. If you are staying in Norway for more than three months, and have children of primary and lower secondary education age, contact the municipality in which you are to live to enrol the child in school. The parents must actively enrol the child in the school.

All state-run primary and lower secondary education in Norway is free of charge, and is financed by the municipalities. There are also a number of private primary and lower secondary schools. Contact the municipality in which you live, or are moving to, for more information about the schools there. The alternative to primary and lower secondary education is private home tuition (hjemmeundervisning).

Primary and lower secondary education is ten years, and pupils normally start school in the year of their sixth birthday. This period of education is divided into two main stages. The first seven years (Years 1-7) are called the primary level (barnetrinnet), and the three subsequent years (Years 8-10) are called the lower secondary level (ungdomstrinnet). The school must provide, for example, all necessary teaching materials and equipment. Pupils take their own lunch. 

​​​​​​​Special needs education

Pupils who do not or cannot satisfactorily benefit from the ordinary teaching are entitled to special needs education (spesialundervisning). It is the school/school owner that decides whether or not the pupil is entitled to special needs education. If the pupil or parents are not satisfied with the decision, they may submit an appeal to the County Governor (Statsforvalteren).

Special language teaching

All pupils whose mother tongue is not Norwegian or Sami are entitled to special tuition in the Norwegian language until their proficiency in Norwegian is sufficient for them to take part in the ordinary teaching. If necessary, they are also entitled to mother tongue instruction and/or subject teaching in two languages.

If there are at least three pupils with a Kven-Finnish background at primary and lower secondary schools in Troms and Finnmark, these pupils are entitled to tuition in Finnish. In the Sami district, all pupils of primary and lower secondary education age are entitled to be taught in Sami and in the Sami language.  Outside the Sami district, if at least ten pupils in a municipality request teaching in Sami and in the Sami language, they are entitled to this, as long as there are at least six pupils left in the group.

Homework help scheme and daycare facilities for schoolchildren

All pupils at primary and lower secondary level are entitled to free homework help. It is the municipality that must offer this. Participation in the homework help scheme is voluntary. Municipalities must also offer schoolchildren in Years 1-4 daycare facilities (skolefritidsordning, SFO) before and after the school day. The same applies to children with special needs in Years 1-7. The daycare scheme is also voluntary. To find out more about these schemes, contact the municipality or the individual school.

Route to school and school transport

Pupils are entitled to free school transport if the route to school is of a certain distance, if it is dangerous, or if the pupil has a disability or injury.

Holidays and school-free days

The school owner decides when there are holidays and school-free days. All Norwegian public holidays are school-free days. The municipality may also allow individual pupils leave from school for up to two weeks if this is justifiable.

Primary and lower secondary education on Svalbard

On Svalbard, it is the local authority, Longyearbyen Lokalstyre, that is responsible for teaching in Longyearbyen.

Please fill in our contact form if you have any questions or if you have encountered an obstacle in another Nordic country.

NB! If you have questions regarding the processing of a specific case or application, or other personal matters, please contact the relevant authority directly.

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homework in norway

No Homework in Norway

Gyri talks about the education system in Norway.

Viyasan : So Gyri, can you tell me a little bit more about the lifestyle of school in Norway? For example, I've heard you guys don't have homework, don't have standardized tests. Tell me a little bit more about how school is in Norway.

Gyri : Yeah. So, we don't have a lot of homework, that's true. When I was little, or in grade school, we had homework, but not too much. I think they changed it recently so that they almost have no homework anymore.

Viyasan : Okay.

Gyri : Also, in junior high I remember that we did have homework, but it was like, it didn't really matter if you did it or not. So it was, how I remember grade school and junior high is that it's pretty relaxed.

Viyasan : So that's very interesting, because I'm sure all around the world students who go to school have lots of homework, they have lots of classes to take, they're probably in classes for lots of hours in a day. That's pretty cool, like, do you think it's working? What are your thoughts on it?

Gyri : Well, I think Norway really wants to focus on that if we have a lot of free time then we learn better, like we'll stay motivated instead of like having to go to school and then also having to work with school when you get home. Like you should ... Norwegians, I think, mostly agree that you do school at school, and then you do other things after so you don't have to think about school all the time.

Viyasan : So there's a large emphasis on what you do outside of the classroom.

Gyri : Yeah.

Viyasan : Got it, okay.

Gyri : Yeah, 'cause I think one of the problems that we have in Norway is like motivation, maybe because, like, we're a more relaxed, or we're, yeah, we're more relaxed when it comes to education, other problems show up. So we have a lot of, yeah, we have a problem with pupils that can't focus.

Viyasan : Got it.

Gyri : And we're also, we don't have enough teachers as well. So that's a problem now in Norway, that not enough people are getting their, or becoming teachers, and there are so many students that have other needs than the rest of the students and we don't have enough teachers to follow up on all of them. So that's Norway's focus now, I think.

Gyri : To get more teachers, and have like, I think the goal is to have one teacher for every five kids.

Viyasan : Wow.

Viyasan : That's intense. Wow.

Gyri : Yeah. So everyone gets the, gets a lot of-

Viyasan : To compare and contrast with Canada at least, and Toronto, in high school there is about one student, or sorry, one teacher per 28 students.

Gyri : Oh, wow.

Viyasan : Students.

Viyasan : So it's very tough for the teacher to learn all the names, especially in the first few months, and they have to keep on doing that year, after year, after year, and every year usually it increases. So 28 turns into 30, 30 turns into 33, and so, wow, that's quite intense to see the differences. But how do you think the students are liking that approach of one teacher and five students? Do they like how that style of class is?

Gyri : I think so, because especially for some students that don't take, that don't learn as fast, they have a teacher that can help them to, yeah, and that helps their specific needs, because if you only have one teacher in like a big classroom, then the really, the kids that learn fast, they'll take everything on their own, and then you'll have like this, these bunch of kids that are lost. So I think people are pretty happy with this.

Gyri : But it's not like ... This is the goal. I think right now maybe we maybe have a teacher for every 10 pupils or something.

Viyasan : And so, for example, there's different ways for teachers to grade a student or a certain class. Of course, there's the pass or fail, very binary , you either pass the class or you fail the class, there's percentages, so you can do very well or very poor in the class, there's the bell curve , of course, and I think the last one would be, yeah, portfolio based, so that's based off of different tasks and the teacher leaves a comment of how you did and ways to improve. Which ways do you think would be best for students to learn and how do they do it in Norway?

Gyri : Well, in Norway I think they do a combination of all of them, but we definitely do a lot of the latter, the portfolio based, so you don't necessarily get a grade, but you get feedback , detailed feedback on how you did and what you need to improve. And I think that's my, I prefer that method, because it's not as, like it focuses on the learning, not on the grade.

Gyr i: And I think that's important, but grades are useful as well. Especially if you're a competitive student, I think grades are very useful. But yeah, so I think the best way to do it is to have a combination of the different types of grading systems. What about you?

Viyasan : Yeah, I agree. In Canada, well at least in Toronto, what they do is they do a mix of both the bell curve and the percentage, and so usually depending on how your class performs, for example if you're in a statistics class filled with 50 students and the average that everyone gets on a certain test is 40% out of 100%, and that usually is the case because of how difficult the class is, there usually is a bell curve so that they meet a minimum of maybe 60%, so that way students that got a 70 on it get a 90 in the class. That's some ways that teachers grade university level classes, but of course in high school usually you're given a letter grade. For example, A plus is perfect, about 90%, and then A, A minus, B, B plus, that kind of stuff, or percentages as well. And so, I think they're both very cool to compare and contrast, but I definitely do like how Norway provides comments and detailed feedback, so it's not just “Yes, you got that right,” and “No, you got that wrong,” it's “This is what you did very well,” and “You can perform even better on those areas by following some of these steps.” I think that's very beneficial, especially for young students trying to grasp a concept , and really master a certain area and find out what they like.

image

There's a large emphasis on what you do outside of the classroom.

An emphasis is a great importance placed on something. Notice the following:

  • Business schools put a large emphasis on math skills.
  • Good companies put a large emphasis on quality control.

image

There's the pass or fail, which is very binary .

A binary test only has a pass or fail grade. Notice the following:

  • A driver's license test is usually binary.
  • The test is binary. Either you pass it or your fail it.

image

There's the bell curve , of course

The bell curve is an even distribution of test scores that looks like a bell. Notice the following:

  • In college, I was in the bottom of the bell curve.
  • Students in the middle of the bell curve are passing the class.

image

You get feedback , detailed feedback

Feedback refers to giving analysis on how someone or something did in an evaluation. Notice the following:

  • The teacher gave good feedback on the paper.
  • I made changes in my report based on my feedback.

grasp a concept

image

Especially for young students trying to grasp a concept .

When you grasp a concept, you understand it well. Notice the following:

  • In physics you need to grasp many concepts.
  • I couldn't grasp the concept, so I asked for help.

master an area

image

They really master a certain area and find out what they like.

When you master something, you get really good at it. Notice the following:

  • He is very smart. He mastered math by age 5.
  • The professor is a master in that area.

Vocabulary Quiz

  • One of their best practices is asking for .
  • The teacher asked the students to graph a .
  • It will help if you put an on the main idea of the narrative.
  • The lecture will not proceed as long as there is a student who cannot the concept.
  • She made sure that she will the anatomy of painting.
  • If the test is , you cannot expect a third option in the results.

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homework in norway

  • Countries Who Spend the Most Time Doing Homework

Homework levels across the world vary greatly by country.

Homework is an important aspect of the education system and is often dreaded by the majority of students all over the world. Although many teachers and educational scholars believe homework improves education performance, many critics and students disagree and believe there is no correlation between homework and improving test scores.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an intergovernmental organization. With headquarters in Paris, the organization was formed for the purpose of stimulating global trade and economic progress among member states. In 2009, the OECD conducted a detailed study to establish the number of hours allocated for doing homework by students around the world and conducted the research in 38 member countries. The test subjects for the study were 15 year old high school students in countries that used PISA exams in their education systems. The results showed that in Shanghai, China the students had the highest number of hours of homework with 13.8 hours per week. Russia followed, where students had an average of 9.7 hours of homework per week. Finland had the least amount of homework hours with 2.8 hours per week, followed closely by South Korea with 2.9 hours. Among all the countries tested, the average homework time was 4.9 hours per week.

Interpretation of the data

Although students from Finland spent the least amount of hours on their homework per week, they performed relatively well on tests which discredits the notion of correlation between the number of hours spent on homework with exam performance. Shanghai teenagers who spent the highest number of hours doing their homework also produced excellent performances in the school tests, while students from some regions such as Macao, Japan, and Singapore increased the score by 17 points per additional hour of homework. The data showed a close relation between the economic backgrounds of students and the number of hours they invested in their homework. Students from affluent backgrounds spent fewer hours doing homework when compared to their less privileged counterparts, most likely due to access to private tutors and homeschooling. In some countries such as Singapore, students from wealthy families invested more time doing their homework than less privileged students and received better results in exams.

Decline in number of hours

Subsequent studies conducted by the OECD in 2012 showed a decrease in the average number hours per week spent by students. Slovakia displayed a drop of four hours per week while Russia declined three hours per week. A few countries including the United States showed no change. The dramatic decline of hours spent doing homework has been attributed to teenager’s increased use of the internet and social media platforms.

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Education in Norway - statistics & facts

Primary and upper secondary education, higher education, key insights.

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Educational attainment of the population in Norway 2022

Educational attainment of the population in Norway 2022, by gender

Leading universities in Norway 2022, by number of students

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Number of students in higher education in Norway 2012-2022

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  • Premium Statistic Educational attainment of the population in Norway 2022
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  • Basic Statistic Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of students in higher education in Norway 2012-2022
  • Basic Statistic Leading universities in Norway 2022, by number of students

Highest education completed among the population in Norway in 2022

Distribution of highest education completed among the population in Norway in 2022, by gender

Number of pupils in primary school in Norway 2012-2022

Number of pupils in primary school in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Number of pupils in lower secondary school in Norway 2012-2022

Number of pupils in lower secondary school in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022

Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Number of students in higher education in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Leading universities in Norway in 2022, by number of registered students

  • Basic Statistic Number of preschools in Norway 2014-2022
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Number of preschools in Norway 2014-2022

Number of preschools in Norway from 2014 to 2022

Share of children in preschool in Norway 2015-2022

Share of children who were in preschool in Norway in 2022

Number of children in preschool in Norway 2014-2022

Number of children in preschool in Norway from 2014 to 2022

Number of children in preschool in Norway 2022, by age

Number of children in preschool in Norway in 2022, by age

Number of children with a different first language in preschool in Norway 2014-2022

Number of children with a different first language in preschool in Norway from 2014 to 2022

Number of children per teacher in preschool in Norway 2016-2022

Number of children per teacher in preschool in Norway from 2016 to 2022

Number of teachers in preschool in Norway 2014-2022

Number of teachers in preschool in Norway from 2014 to 2022

Sharer of teachers who are men in preschool in Norway 2014-2022

Share of teachers who are men in preschool in Norway from 2014 to 2022

Elementary school

  • Basic Statistic Number of elementary schools in Norway 2012-2022, by type
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  • Basic Statistic Pupil to teacher ratio in primary schools in Norway 2014-2023
  • Basic Statistic Number of private primary schools in Norway 2012-2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of pupils in private primary schools in Norway 2012-2022
  • Basic Statistic Primary education expenditure in Norway 2015-2019
  • Basic Statistic Primary education expenditure per pupil in Norway 2014-2021

Number of elementary schools in Norway 2012-2022, by type

Number of elementary schools in Norway from 2012 to 2022, by type

Number of teachers in primary school in Norway 2015-2023

Number of teachers in primary school in Norway from 2015 to 2023

Pupil to teacher ratio in primary schools in Norway 2014-2023

Pupil to teacher ratio in primary schools in Norway from 2014 to 2023

Number of private primary schools in Norway 2012-2022

Number of private primary schools in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Number of pupils in private primary schools in Norway 2012-2022

Number of pupils in private primary schools in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Primary education expenditure in Norway 2015-2019

Expenditure on primary education in Norway from 2015 to 2019 (in million NOK)

Primary education expenditure per pupil in Norway 2014-2021

Expenditure per pupil on primary education in Norway from 2014 to 2021 (in NOK)

Upper secondary education

  • Basic Statistic Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022, by gender
  • Basic Statistic Number of immigrant students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of teachers in upper secondary school in Norway 2015-2022
  • Basic Statistic Number of students per teacher in upper secondary schools in Norway 2015-2021
  • Basic Statistic Number of upper secondary schools in Norway 2016-2023
  • Basic Statistic Upper secondary education expenditure in Norway 2015-2022
  • Basic Statistic Upper secondary education expenditure per citizen in Norway 2015-2022

Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022, by gender

Number of students in upper secondary education in Norway from 2012 to 2022, by gender

Number of immigrant students in upper secondary education in Norway 2012-2022

Number of students with immigration background in upper secondary education in Norway from 2012 to 2022

Number of teachers in upper secondary school in Norway 2015-2022

Number of teachers in upper secondary school in Norway from 2015 to 2022

Number of students per teacher in upper secondary schools in Norway 2015-2021

Student to teacher ratio in upper secondary schools in Norway from 2015 to 2021

Number of upper secondary schools in Norway 2016-2023

Number of upper secondary schools in Norway from 2016 to 2023

Upper secondary education expenditure in Norway 2015-2022

Net expenditure on upper secondary education in Norway from 2015 to 2022 (in billion NOK)

Upper secondary education expenditure per citizen in Norway 2015-2022

Expenditure on upper secondary education per citizen aged 16 to 18 years in Norway from 2015 to 2022 (in NOK)

  • Basic Statistic Number of students in higher education in Norway 2012-2022, by gender
  • Basic Statistic Number of students in higher education in Norway 2022, by field of study
  • Basic Statistic Share of higher education students from Norway studying abroad 2012-2022, by gender
  • Basic Statistic Higher education students from Norway studying abroad 2022, by destination
  • Premium Statistic Number of people with a doctorate degree in Norway 2014-2022, by gender
  • Premium Statistic Number of doctorate degrees in Norway 2022, by field of study
  • Basic Statistic Higher education expenditure in Norway 2015-2019

Number of students in higher education in Norway 2012-2022, by gender

Number of students in higher education in Norway from 2012 to 2022, by gender

Number of students in higher education in Norway 2022, by field of study

Number of students in higher education in Norway in 2022, by field of study

Share of higher education students from Norway studying abroad 2012-2022, by gender

Share of higher education students from Norway studying abroad from 2012 to 2022, by gender

Higher education students from Norway studying abroad 2022, by destination

Number of higher education students from Norway studying abroad in 2022, by destination

Number of people with a doctorate degree in Norway 2014-2022, by gender

Number of people with a doctorate (PhD) degree in Norway from 2014 to 2022, by gender

Number of doctorate degrees in Norway 2022, by field of study

Number of doctorate degrees in Norway in 2022, by field of study

Higher education expenditure in Norway 2015-2019

Expenditure on higher education in Norway from 2015 to 2019 (in million NOK)

  • Basic Statistic Share of primary school pupils who have been bullied in Norway 2016-2023
  • Basic Statistic Share of upper secondary students who have been bullied in Norway 2016-2023
  • Basic Statistic Academic environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022
  • Basic Statistic Social environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022
  • Basic Statistic Study program satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022

Share of primary school pupils who have been bullied in Norway 2016-2023

Share of primary school pupils who have been bullied at least two to three times per month in Norway from 2016 to 2023

Share of upper secondary students who have been bullied in Norway 2016-2023

Share of upper secondary students who have been bullied at least two or three times a month in Norway from 2016 to 2023

Academic environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022

Academic environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway from 2013 to 2022

Social environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022

Social environment satisfaction among higher education students in Norway from 2013 to 2022

Study program satisfaction among higher education students in Norway 2013-2022

Satisfaction with study program among higher education students in Norway from 2013 to 2022

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Homework could be scrapped for schoolchildren in Oslo

Oslo's socialist left party aims to introduce a new system of 'homework done at school' to make society more equal, article bookmarked.

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Homework for schoolchildren in Norway’s capital may be abolished.

A new city council for Oslo – a coalition between Norway’s Labour Party, Greens and the Socialist Left party – came to power on Wednesday, and could mark the end of conventional homework as students know it.

For the Socialist Left party aims to reform homework's current practice on the basis that it “reinforces social inequalities”, according to the Norwegian news site The Local .

In its coalition negotiations, the Socialist Left party secured a promise from Labour and the Greens to “trial alternative methods of assessment and other ways of organising homework” – which it now hopes to turn into a reality.

“We want instead to focus on what we call ‘school exercises’,” Audun Lysbakken, the Socialist Left party’s leader told Norwegian news site NKR.

“Students are helped by their teacher while they are still at school. This ensures more learning for all children and less stress for the family.”

Recommended

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Sunniva Holmas Eidsvoll, the leader of the party in Oslo, reportedly said she wanted homework to be temporarily abolished for children aged six to 13, or at least up until the age of nine.

Education is one of the key areas the Socialist Left party campaigns on.

It believes the widely-undertaken practice of schoolchildren completing extra work at home to test and reinforce their knowledge is disadvantageous to those teenagers who do not get much help with their homework from parents.

Instead, it wishes to see a system of “homework done at school”.

“One in three parents report that they sometimes fall short when they should be helping their kids with their homework,” the party says on its website.

“Research showed that homework may reinforce low self-esteem among disadvantaged learners and give poorer motivation.

“SV [Sosialistisk Venstrepart - Socialist Left] proposes a daily hour of rehearsal work so most of the homework can be done at school with a teacher present.

“It is particularly important for those students who do not get help at home but will be positive for everyone.

“When homework is done at school, it becomes less homework stress and better leisure and family time when the school day is over.

“All children should have equal opportunities for learning. They have not today. Therefore SV [aims to] make the school day more comprehensive and better for the students.”

Oslo’s new city council consists of four Labour councillors, two from the Green party, and one from the Socialist Left party, with a Socialist Left mayor and a Labour deputy mayor.

Among those appointed to the city’s new government was Geir Lippestad , the lawyer who defended Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik.

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IMAGES

  1. The Global Search for Education: More from Norway

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  2. DOING MY HOMEWORK

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  3. COVID-19 series: Norway

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  4. Lofoten Vesteralen Archipelagos. Norway. (English Homework).

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  5. Homework could be scrapped for schoolchildren in Oslo

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  4. Can you still study FREE in Norway? 🇳🇴

  5. Norwegian/Collegian Episode 2: Homework!

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COMMENTS

  1. Is homework useful or necessary?

    friday 21. October 2022 - 04:30 We are used to homework being part of a school's learning programme, but homework is not mandated by the state and is only one of several options that schools have. The Education Act currently includes no clear authorisation for assigning homework.

  2. How useful or necessary is homework?

    In the 2019/2020 school year, Flatåsen and Stabbursmoen schools were homework-free with two extra school hours a week, while Byåsen and Romulslia schools were homework-free with no change in the timetable. All four schools were in Trondheim municipality.

  3. Homework and pupil achievement in Norway

    Homework and pupil achievement in Norway Published: 21 January 2010 A report by Marte Rønning shows that pupils from lower socio-economic backgrounds are more likely to spend no time on homework than pupils from higher socio-economic backgrounds. The report also shows a positive effect of homework on average.

  4. Homework and pupil achievement in Norway

    5 February 2011 Open and read the publication in PDF (27 pages) By using data on Norwegian 4th and 8th graders who participated in TIMSS 2007, this report starts out by investigating whether time spent on homework varies across pupils from different socio-economic backgrounds.

  5. Facts about education in Norway 2023

    Published: 5 January 2023 Using text, tables, figures and maps, this publication provides brief facts about education in Norway. Open and read the publication in PDF (972.4 KB) Series archive ISBN (electronic): 978-82-587-1643-

  6. Norwegian Policy Initiative of Offering Free Homework Assistance in

    Through reviewing an education policy blueprint in Norway, titled "An Offer of Homework Assistance" (issued by the Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training in June 2010), the present article aims to shed light on how Norway uses education as an arena to realize social equality and equity. Design/Approach/Methods:

  7. PDF Norwegian Policy Initiative The Author(s) 2020 of Offering Free Homework

    Abstract Purpose: Through reviewing an education policy blueprint in Norway, titled "An Offer of Homework Assistance" (issued by the Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training in June 2010), the present article aims to shed light on how Norway uses education as an arena to realize social equality and equity.

  8. Homework and pupil achievement in Norway

    7 Citations Citation Type More Filters Homework in primary school: could it be made more child-friendly? K. Holte Education 2016 Homework plays a crucial role in the childhood environment. Teachers argue that homework is important for learning both school subjects and a good work ethic. Hattie (2013, p.39) references 116… Expand 11 2 Excerpts

  9. Homework practices of English teachers at Norwegian lower ...

    This thesis is about the homework practices of English teachers at lower secondary schools in Norway. The aim of the thesis was to learn about what attitudes, practices and considerations English teachers have when assigning homework, and to connect this to existing international and national research on the field.

  10. Homework and pupil achievement in Norway

    Homework and pupil achievement in Norway Evidence from TIMSS. Publisert: 5. februar 2011. Åpne og les publikasjonen i PDF (27 sider) By using data on Norwegian 4th and 8th graders who participated in TIMSS 2007, this report starts out by investigating whether time spent on homework varies across pupils from different socio-economic backgrounds

  11. Norway

    Introduction Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Kirkendall—Spring Photographers National anthem of Norway Land and sea are very closely linked in Norway, a country that occupies the western half of the Scandinavian peninsula in northern Europe.

  12. Norwegian Policy Initiative of Offering Free Homework Assistance in Schools

    Purpose: Through reviewing an education policy blueprint in Norway, titled "An Offer of Homework Assistance" (issued by the Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training in June 2010), the present article aims to shed light on how Norway uses education as an arena to realize social equality and equity. Design/Approach/Methods: This is an analytical policy review.

  13. Primary and lower secondary school in Norway

    All pupils at primary and lower secondary level are entitled to free homework help. It is the municipality that must offer this. Participation in the homework help scheme is voluntary. Municipalities must also offer schoolchildren in Years 1-4 daycare facilities (skolefritidsordning, SFO) before and after the school day.

  14. Policy Review on the Norwegian Initiative of Offering Free Homework

    Norway through which homework assistance was offered to all pupils from Grade 1 to Grade 4. At. the beginning of June 2010, the Parliament passed these amendments; section 13-7a of the Edu-

  15. No Homework in Norway

    Script Vocab Quiz Viyasan: So Gyri, can you tell me a little bit more about the lifestyle of school in Norway? For example, I've heard you guys don't have homework, don't have standardized tests. Tell me a little bit more about how school is in Norway. Gyri: Yeah. So, we don't have a lot of homework, that's true.

  16. Countries Who Spend the Most Time Doing Homework

    The results showed that in Shanghai, China the students had the highest number of hours of homework with 13.8 hours per week. Russia followed, where students had an average of 9.7 hours of homework per week. Finland had the least amount of homework hours with 2.8 hours per week, followed closely by South Korea with 2.9 hours.

  17. How easy is it to work as an English teacher in Norway?

    The annual salary, if you are employed at an international school, is around 386,000 kr (£32,150 / $39,000) for primary school teachers. And 465,000 kr (£38,730 / $48,000) for secondary school teachers. Tips from the experts. "Avoid thinking of Norway as a country where you can use TEFL as a temporary way to earn and travel - there is not ...

  18. Education in Norway

    Overview Educational attainment of the population in Norway 2022 Educational attainment of the population in Norway 2022 Highest education completed among the population in Norway in 2022...

  19. Work in Norway

    Persons and companies looking to start a permanent business in Norway. Companies in Norway buying services abroad or recruiting foreign workers. Workinnorway.no is a step-by-step guide to working or doing business in Norway - how to find a job, get registered, tax and reporting, social security, etc.

  20. Why do Finnish pupils succeed with less homework?

    Homework can be the cause of friction in families - but not in Finland By Sean Coughlan BBC News education and family correspondent @seanjcoughlan How do Finnish youngsters spend less time in...

  21. Homework could be scrapped for schoolchildren in Oslo

    Homework for schoolchildren in Norway's capital may be abolished. A new city council for Oslo - a coalition between Norway's Labour Party, Greens and the Socialist Left party - came to ...

  22. Final homework (***)

    This course will make you a more informed, credible and successful job-seeker in Norway. It covers the entire job-seeker process in detail, from the start until you get the job. Learn how to adapt your CV and application letter for the Norwegian job market. Enhance your performance during the job interview by knowing what to expect and what Norwegian employers place an emphasis on. Become a ...

  23. Norway

    Norway's industries make food products, ships, machinery, metals, paper products, and other goods. Fishing and logging are important to the economy as well. ... Improved homework resources designed to support a variety of curriculum subjects and standards. A new, third level of content, designed specially to meet the advanced needs of the ...