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Examples of Rubric Creation

Creating a rubric takes time and requires thought and experimentation. Here you can see the steps used to create two kinds of rubric: one for problems in a physics exam for a small, upper-division physics course, and another for an essay assignment in a large, lower-division sociology course.

Physics Problems

In STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), assignments tend to be analytical and problem-based. Holistic rubrics can be an efficient, consistent, and fair way to grade a problem set. An analytical rubric often gives a more clear picture of what a student should direct their future learning efforts on. Since holistic rubrics try to label overall understanding, they can lead to more regrade requests when compared to analytical rubric with more explicit criteria. When starting to grade a problem, it is important to think about the relevant conceptual ingredients in the solution. Then look at a sample of student work to get a feel for student mistakes. Decide what rubric you will use (e.g., holistic or analytic, and how many points). Apply the holistic rubric by marking comments and sorting the students’ assignments into stacks (e.g., five stacks if using a five-point scale). Finally, check the stacks for consistency and mark the scores. The following is a sample homework problem from a UC Berkeley Physics Department undergraduate course in mechanics.

Homework Problem

Learning objective.

Solve for position and speed along a projectile’s trajectory.

Desired Traits: Conceptual Elements Needed for the Solution

  • Decompose motion into vertical and horizontal axes.
  • Identify that the maximum height occurs when the vertical velocity is 0.
  • Apply kinematics equation with g as the acceleration to solve for the time and height.
  • Evaluate the numerical expression.

A note on analytic rubrics: If you decide you feel more comfortable grading with an analytic rubric, you can assign a point value to each concept. The drawback to this method is that it can sometimes unfairly penalize a student who has a good understanding of the problem but makes a lot of minor errors. Because the analytic method tends to have many more parts, the method can take quite a bit more time to apply. In the end, your analytic rubric should give results that agree with the common-sense assessment of how well the student understood the problem. This sense is well captured by the holistic method.

Holistic Rubric

A holistic rubric, closely based on a rubric by Bruce Birkett and Andrew Elby:

[a] This policy especially makes sense on exam problems, for which students are under time pressure and are more likely to make harmless algebraic mistakes. It would also be reasonable to have stricter standards for homework problems.

Analytic Rubric

The following is an analytic rubric that takes the desired traits of the solution and assigns point values to each of the components. Note that the relative point values should reflect the importance in the overall problem. For example, the steps of the problem solving should be worth more than the final numerical value of the solution. This rubric also provides clarity for where students are lacking in their current understanding of the problem.

Try to avoid penalizing multiple times for the same mistake by choosing your evaluation criteria to be related to distinct learning outcomes. In designing your rubric, you can decide how finely to evaluate each component. Having more possible point values on your rubric can give more detailed feedback on a student’s performance, though it typically takes more time for the grader to assess.

Of course, problems can, and often do, feature the use of multiple learning outcomes in tandem. When a mistake could be assigned to multiple criteria, it is advisable to check that the overall problem grade is reasonable with the student’s mastery of the problem. Not having to decide how particular mistakes should be deducted from the analytic rubric is one advantage of the holistic rubric. When designing problems, it can be very beneficial for students not to have problems with several subparts that rely on prior answers. These tend to disproportionately skew the grades of students who miss an ingredient early on. When possible, consider making independent problems for testing different learning outcomes.

Sociology Research Paper

An introductory-level, large-lecture course is a difficult setting for managing a student research assignment. With the assistance of an instructional support team that included a GSI teaching consultant and a UC Berkeley librarian [b] , sociology lecturer Mary Kelsey developed the following assignment:

This was a lengthy and complex assignment worth a substantial portion of the course grade. Since the class was very large, the instructor wanted to minimize the effort it would take her GSIs to grade the papers in a manner consistent with the assignment’s learning objectives. For these reasons Dr. Kelsey and the instructional team gave a lot of forethought to crafting a detailed grading rubric.

Desired Traits

  • Use and interpretation of data
  • Reflection on personal experiences
  • Application of course readings and materials
  • Organization, writing, and mechanics

For this assignment, the instructional team decided to grade each trait individually because there seemed to be too many independent variables to grade holistically. They could have used a five-point scale, a three-point scale, or a descriptive analytic scale. The choice depended on the complexity of the assignment and the kind of information they wanted to convey to students about their work.

Below are three of the analytic rubrics they considered for the Argument trait and a holistic rubric for all the traits together. Lastly you will find the entire analytic rubric, for all five desired traits, that was finally used for the assignment. Which would you choose, and why?

Five-Point Scale

Three-point scale, simplified three-point scale, numbers replaced with descriptive terms.

For some assignments, you may choose to use a holistic rubric, or one scale for the whole assignment. This type of rubric is particularly useful when the variables you want to assess just cannot be usefully separated. We chose not to use a holistic rubric for this assignment because we wanted to be able to grade each trait separately, but we’ve completed a holistic version here for comparative purposes.

Final Analytic Rubric

This is the rubric the instructor finally decided to use. It rates five major traits, each on a five-point scale. This allowed for fine but clear distinctions in evaluating the students’ final papers.

[b] These materials were developed during UC Berkeley’s 2005–2006 Mellon Library/Faculty Fellowship for Undergraduate Research program. M embers of the instructional team who worked with Lecturer Kelsey in developing the grading rubric included Susan H askell-Khan, a GSI Center teaching consultant and doctoral candidate in history, and Sarah McDaniel, a teaching librarian with the Doe/Moffitt Libraries.

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Whenever we give feedback, it inevitably reflects our priorities and expectations about the assignment. In other words, we're using a rubric to choose which elements (e.g., right/wrong answer, work shown, thesis analysis, style, etc.) receive more or less feedback and what counts as a "good thesis" or a "less good thesis." When we evaluate student work, that is, we always have a rubric. The question is how consciously we’re applying it, whether we’re transparent with students about what it is, whether it’s aligned with what students are learning in our course, and whether we’re applying it consistently. The more we’re doing all of the following, the more consistent and equitable our feedback and grading will be:

Being conscious of your rubric ideally means having one written out, with explicit criteria and concrete features that describe more/less successful versions of each criterion. If you don't have a rubric written out, you can use this assignment prompt decoder for TFs & TAs to determine which elements and criteria should be the focus of your rubric.

Being transparent with students about your rubric means sharing it with them ahead of time and making sure they understand it. This assignment prompt decoder for students is designed to facilitate this discussion between students and instructors.

Aligning your rubric with your course means articulating the relationship between “this” assignment and the ones that scaffold up and build from it, which ideally involves giving students the chance to practice different elements of the assignment and get formative feedback before they’re asked to submit material that will be graded. For more ideas and advice on how this looks, see the " Formative Assignments " page at Gen Ed Writes.

Applying your rubric consistently means using a stable vocabulary when making your comments and keeping your feedback focused on the criteria in your rubric.

How to Build a Rubric

Rubrics and assignment prompts are two sides of a coin. If you’ve already created a prompt, you should have all of the information you need to make a rubric. Of course, it doesn’t always work out that way, and that itself turns out to be an advantage of making rubrics: it’s a great way to test whether your prompt is in fact communicating to students everything they need to know about the assignment they’ll be doing.

So what do students need to know? In general, assignment prompts boil down to a small number of common elements :

  • Evidence and Analysis
  • Style and Conventions
  • Specific Guidelines
  • Advice on Process

If an assignment prompt is clearly addressing each of these elements, then students know what they’re doing, why they’re doing it, and when/how/for whom they’re doing it. From the standpoint of a rubric, we can see how these elements correspond to the criteria for feedback:

All of these criteria can be weighed and given feedback, and they’re all things that students can be taught and given opportunities to practice. That makes them good criteria for a rubric, and that in turn is why they belong in every assignment prompt.

Which leaves “purpose” and “advice on process.” These elements are, in a sense, the heart and engine of any assignment, but their role in a rubric will differ from assignment to assignment. Here are a couple of ways to think about each.

On the one hand, “purpose” is the rationale for how the other elements are working in an assignment, and so feedback on them adds up to feedback on the skills students are learning vis-a-vis the overall purpose. In that sense, separately grading whether students have achieved an assignment’s “purpose” can be tricky.

On the other hand, metacognitive components such as journals or cover letters or artist statements are a great way for students to tie work on their assignment to the broader (often future-oriented) reasons why they’ve been doing the assignment. Making this kind of component a small part of the overall grade, e.g., 5% and/or part of “specific guidelines,” can allow it to be a nudge toward a meaningful self-reflection for students on what they’ve been learning and how it might build toward other assignments or experiences.

Advice on process

As with “purpose,” “advice on process” often amounts to helping students break down an assignment into the elements they’ll get feedback on. In that sense, feedback on those steps is often more informal or aimed at giving students practice with skills or components that will be parts of the bigger assignment.

For those reasons, though, the kind of feedback we give students on smaller steps has its own (even if ungraded) rubric. For example, if a prompt asks students to  propose a research question as part of the bigger project, they might get feedback on whether it can be answered by evidence, or whether it has a feasible scope, or who the audience for its findings might be. All of those criteria, in turn, could—and ideally would—later be part of the rubric for the graded project itself. Or perhaps students are submitting earlier, smaller components of an assignment for separate grades; or are expected to submit separate components all together at the end as a portfolio, perhaps together with a cover letter or artist statement .

Using Rubrics Effectively

In the same way that rubrics can facilitate the design phase of assignment, they can also facilitate the teaching and feedback phases, including of course grading. Here are a few ways this can work in a course:

Discuss the rubric ahead of time with your teaching team. Getting on the same page about what students will be doing and how different parts of the assignment fit together is, in effect, laying out what needs to happen in class and in section, both in terms of what students need to learn and practice, and how the coming days or weeks should be sequenced.

Share the rubric with your students ahead of time. For the same reason it's ideal for course heads to discuss rubrics with their teaching team, it’s ideal for the teaching team to discuss the rubric with students. Not only does the rubric lay out the different skills students will learn during an assignment and which skills are more or less important for that assignment,  it means that the formative feedback they get along the way is more legible as getting practice on elements of the “bigger assignment.” To be sure, this can’t always happen. Rubrics aren’t always up and running at the beginning of an assignment, and sometimes they emerge more inductively during the feedback and grading process, as instructors take stock of what students have actually submitted. In both cases, later is better than never—there’s no need to make the perfect the enemy of the good. Circulating a rubric at the time you return student work can still be a valuable tool to help students see the relationship between the learning objectives and goals of the assignment and the feedback and grade they’ve received.

Discuss the rubric with your teaching team during the grading process. If your assignment has a rubric, it’s important to make sure that everyone who will be grading is able to use the rubric consistently. Most rubrics aren’t exhaustive—see the note above on rubrics that are “too specific”—and a great way to see how different graders are handling “real-life” scenarios for an assignment is to have the entire team grade a few samples (including examples that seem more representative of an “A” or a “B”) and compare everyone’s approaches. We suggest scheduling a grade-norming session for your teaching staff.

  • Designing Your Course
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  • When/Why/How: Some General Principles of Responding to Student Work
  • Consistency and Equity in Grading
  • Assessing Class Participation
  • Assessing Non-Traditional Assignments
  • Beyond “the Grade”: Alternative Approaches to Assessment
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  • Advising and Mentoring
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Research Paper Rubric

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Rubric Examples

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A rubric is a type of scoring guide that assesses and articulates specific components and expectations for an assignment. Rubrics can be used for a variety of assignments: research papers, group projects, portfolios and presentations.  Why use rubrics?

VALUE Rubrics

V alid  A ssessment of  L earning in  U ndergraduate  E ducation (VALUE) for improvement of learning and authentic assessment, developed and tested by university professionals through AAC&U.

  • Civic Engagement Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Creative Thinking Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Critical Thinking Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Ethical Reasoning Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Global Learning Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Information Literacy Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Inquiry and Analysis Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Integrative Learning Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Intercultural Knowledge Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Lifelong Learning Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Oral Communication Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Problem Solving Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Quantitative Literacy Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Reading Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Teamwork Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)
  • Written Communication Rubric – VALUE  (PDF)

Other Rubric Examples

  • Class Participation Rubric – Carnegie Mellon  (PDF)
  • Critical and Integrative Thinking Rubric – Washington State Univ  (PDF)
  • Critical Thinking Rubric – Cal State Univ Fresno  (PDF)
  • Design Project Rubric  (PDF)
  • Graduate Portfolio Writing Rubric – Cal State Univ Long Beach  (PDF)
  • Group Participation Rubric  (PDF)
  • Group Presentation Rubric – Carnegie Mellon  (PDF)
  • Levels of Participation Rubric – BGU  (PDF)
  • Media Design Rubric  (PDF)
  • Oral Communication Rubric – Carnegie Mellon  (PDF)
  • Oral Exam Rubric – Carnegie Mellon  (PDF)
  • Participation (Holistic) Rubric  (PDF)
  • Seminar Discussion Rubric – Carnegie Mellon  (PDF)
  • Undergraduate-Research-Paper-Rubric  (PDF)

Rubrics by Programs

  • College of Arts and Sciences Rubric Examples
  • College of Business and Management Rubric Examples
  • College of Education and Human Services Rubric Examples
  • College of Public Affairs and Administration Rubric Examples

Rubric Best Practices, Examples, and Templates

A rubric is a scoring tool that identifies the different criteria relevant to an assignment, assessment, or learning outcome and states the possible levels of achievement in a specific, clear, and objective way. Use rubrics to assess project-based student work including essays, group projects, creative endeavors, and oral presentations.

Rubrics can help instructors communicate expectations to students and assess student work fairly, consistently and efficiently. Rubrics can provide students with informative feedback on their strengths and weaknesses so that they can reflect on their performance and work on areas that need improvement.

How to Get Started

Best practices, moodle how-to guides.

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Step 1: Analyze the assignment

The first step in the rubric creation process is to analyze the assignment or assessment for which you are creating a rubric. To do this, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of the assignment and your feedback? What do you want students to demonstrate through the completion of this assignment (i.e. what are the learning objectives measured by it)? Is it a summative assessment, or will students use the feedback to create an improved product?
  • Does the assignment break down into different or smaller tasks? Are these tasks equally important as the main assignment?
  • What would an “excellent” assignment look like? An “acceptable” assignment? One that still needs major work?
  • How detailed do you want the feedback you give students to be? Do you want/need to give them a grade?

Step 2: Decide what kind of rubric you will use

Types of rubrics: holistic, analytic/descriptive, single-point

Holistic Rubric. A holistic rubric includes all the criteria (such as clarity, organization, mechanics, etc.) to be considered together and included in a single evaluation. With a holistic rubric, the rater or grader assigns a single score based on an overall judgment of the student’s work, using descriptions of each performance level to assign the score.

Advantages of holistic rubrics:

  • Can p lace an emphasis on what learners can demonstrate rather than what they cannot
  • Save grader time by minimizing the number of evaluations to be made for each student
  • Can be used consistently across raters, provided they have all been trained

Disadvantages of holistic rubrics:

  • Provide less specific feedback than analytic/descriptive rubrics
  • Can be difficult to choose a score when a student’s work is at varying levels across the criteria
  • Any weighting of c riteria cannot be indicated in the rubric

Analytic/Descriptive Rubric . An analytic or descriptive rubric often takes the form of a table with the criteria listed in the left column and with levels of performance listed across the top row. Each cell contains a description of what the specified criterion looks like at a given level of performance. Each of the criteria is scored individually.

Advantages of analytic rubrics:

  • Provide detailed feedback on areas of strength or weakness
  • Each criterion can be weighted to reflect its relative importance

Disadvantages of analytic rubrics:

  • More time-consuming to create and use than a holistic rubric
  • May not be used consistently across raters unless the cells are well defined
  • May result in giving less personalized feedback

Single-Point Rubric . A single-point rubric is breaks down the components of an assignment into different criteria, but instead of describing different levels of performance, only the “proficient” level is described. Feedback space is provided for instructors to give individualized comments to help students improve and/or show where they excelled beyond the proficiency descriptors.

Advantages of single-point rubrics:

  • Easier to create than an analytic/descriptive rubric
  • Perhaps more likely that students will read the descriptors
  • Areas of concern and excellence are open-ended
  • May removes a focus on the grade/points
  • May increase student creativity in project-based assignments

Disadvantage of analytic rubrics: Requires more work for instructors writing feedback

Step 3 (Optional): Look for templates and examples.

You might Google, “Rubric for persuasive essay at the college level” and see if there are any publicly available examples to start from. Ask your colleagues if they have used a rubric for a similar assignment. Some examples are also available at the end of this article. These rubrics can be a great starting point for you, but consider steps 3, 4, and 5 below to ensure that the rubric matches your assignment description, learning objectives and expectations.

Step 4: Define the assignment criteria

Make a list of the knowledge and skills are you measuring with the assignment/assessment Refer to your stated learning objectives, the assignment instructions, past examples of student work, etc. for help.

  Helpful strategies for defining grading criteria:

  • Collaborate with co-instructors, teaching assistants, and other colleagues
  • Brainstorm and discuss with students
  • Can they be observed and measured?
  • Are they important and essential?
  • Are they distinct from other criteria?
  • Are they phrased in precise, unambiguous language?
  • Revise the criteria as needed
  • Consider whether some are more important than others, and how you will weight them.

Step 5: Design the rating scale

Most ratings scales include between 3 and 5 levels. Consider the following questions when designing your rating scale:

  • Given what students are able to demonstrate in this assignment/assessment, what are the possible levels of achievement?
  • How many levels would you like to include (more levels means more detailed descriptions)
  • Will you use numbers and/or descriptive labels for each level of performance? (for example 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 and/or Exceeds expectations, Accomplished, Proficient, Developing, Beginning, etc.)
  • Don’t use too many columns, and recognize that some criteria can have more columns that others . The rubric needs to be comprehensible and organized. Pick the right amount of columns so that the criteria flow logically and naturally across levels.

Step 6: Write descriptions for each level of the rating scale

Artificial Intelligence tools like Chat GPT have proven to be useful tools for creating a rubric. You will want to engineer your prompt that you provide the AI assistant to ensure you get what you want. For example, you might provide the assignment description, the criteria you feel are important, and the number of levels of performance you want in your prompt. Use the results as a starting point, and adjust the descriptions as needed.

Building a rubric from scratch

For a single-point rubric , describe what would be considered “proficient,” i.e. B-level work, and provide that description. You might also include suggestions for students outside of the actual rubric about how they might surpass proficient-level work.

For analytic and holistic rubrics , c reate statements of expected performance at each level of the rubric.

  • Consider what descriptor is appropriate for each criteria, e.g., presence vs absence, complete vs incomplete, many vs none, major vs minor, consistent vs inconsistent, always vs never. If you have an indicator described in one level, it will need to be described in each level.
  • You might start with the top/exemplary level. What does it look like when a student has achieved excellence for each/every criterion? Then, look at the “bottom” level. What does it look like when a student has not achieved the learning goals in any way? Then, complete the in-between levels.
  • For an analytic rubric , do this for each particular criterion of the rubric so that every cell in the table is filled. These descriptions help students understand your expectations and their performance in regard to those expectations.

Well-written descriptions:

  • Describe observable and measurable behavior
  • Use parallel language across the scale
  • Indicate the degree to which the standards are met

Step 7: Create your rubric

Create your rubric in a table or spreadsheet in Word, Google Docs, Sheets, etc., and then transfer it by typing it into Moodle. You can also use online tools to create the rubric, but you will still have to type the criteria, indicators, levels, etc., into Moodle. Rubric creators: Rubistar , iRubric

Step 8: Pilot-test your rubric

Prior to implementing your rubric on a live course, obtain feedback from:

  • Teacher assistants

Try out your new rubric on a sample of student work. After you pilot-test your rubric, analyze the results to consider its effectiveness and revise accordingly.

  • Limit the rubric to a single page for reading and grading ease
  • Use parallel language . Use similar language and syntax/wording from column to column. Make sure that the rubric can be easily read from left to right or vice versa.
  • Use student-friendly language . Make sure the language is learning-level appropriate. If you use academic language or concepts, you will need to teach those concepts.
  • Share and discuss the rubric with your students . Students should understand that the rubric is there to help them learn, reflect, and self-assess. If students use a rubric, they will understand the expectations and their relevance to learning.
  • Consider scalability and reusability of rubrics. Create rubric templates that you can alter as needed for multiple assignments.
  • Maximize the descriptiveness of your language. Avoid words like “good” and “excellent.” For example, instead of saying, “uses excellent sources,” you might describe what makes a resource excellent so that students will know. You might also consider reducing the reliance on quantity, such as a number of allowable misspelled words. Focus instead, for example, on how distracting any spelling errors are.

Example of an analytic rubric for a final paper

Example of a holistic rubric for a final paper, single-point rubric, more examples:.

  • Single Point Rubric Template ( variation )
  • Analytic Rubric Template make a copy to edit
  • A Rubric for Rubrics
  • Bank of Online Discussion Rubrics in different formats
  • Mathematical Presentations Descriptive Rubric
  • Math Proof Assessment Rubric
  • Kansas State Sample Rubrics
  • Design Single Point Rubric

Technology Tools: Rubrics in Moodle

  • Moodle Docs: Rubrics
  • Moodle Docs: Grading Guide (use for single-point rubrics)

Tools with rubrics (other than Moodle)

  • Google Assignments
  • Turnitin Assignments: Rubric or Grading Form

Other resources

  • DePaul University (n.d.). Rubrics .
  • Gonzalez, J. (2014). Know your terms: Holistic, Analytic, and Single-Point Rubrics . Cult of Pedagogy.
  • Goodrich, H. (1996). Understanding rubrics . Teaching for Authentic Student Performance, 54 (4), 14-17. Retrieved from   
  • Miller, A. (2012). Tame the beast: tips for designing and using rubrics.
  • Ragupathi, K., Lee, A. (2020). Beyond Fairness and Consistency in Grading: The Role of Rubrics in Higher Education. In: Sanger, C., Gleason, N. (eds) Diversity and Inclusion in Global Higher Education. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore.

Examples of Rubrics

Here are some rubric examples from different colleges and universities, as well as the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) VALUE rubrics. We would also like to include examples from Syracuse University faculty and staff. If you would be willing to share your rubric with us, please click  here.

  • Art and Design Rubric (Rhode Island University)
  • Theater Arts Writing Rubric (California State University)

Class Participation

  • Holistic Participation Rubric (University of Virginia)
  • Large Lecture Courses with TAs (Carnegie Mellon University)

Doctoral Program Milestones

  • Qualifying Examination (Syracuse University)
  • Comprehensive Core Examination (Portland State University)
  • Dissertation Proposal (Portland State University)
  • Dissertation (Portland State University)

Experiential Learning

  • Key Competencies in Community-Engaged Learning and Teaching (Campus Compact)
  • Global Learning and Intercultural Knowledge (International Cross-Cultural Experiential Learning Evaluation Toolkit)

Humanities and Social Science

  • Anthropology Paper (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • Economics Paper (University of Kentucky)
  • History Paper (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • Literary Analysis (Minnesota State University)
  • Philosophy Paper (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • Psychology Paper (Loyola Marymount University)
  • Sociology Paper (University of California)

Media and Design

  • Media and Design Elements Rubric (Samford University)

Natural Science

  • Physics Paper (Illinois State University)
  • Chemistry Paper (Utah State University)
  • Biology Research Report (Loyola Marymount University)

Online Learning

  • Discussion Forums (Simmons College)

Syracuse University’s Shared Competencies

Ethics, Integrity, and Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion rubric (*pdf)

Critical and Creative Thinking rubric (*pdf)

Scientific Inquiry and Research Skills rubric (*pdf)

Civic and Global Responsibility rubric (*pdf)

Communication Skills rubric (*pdf)

Information Literacy and Technological Agility rubric (*pdf)

  • Journal Reflection (The State University of New Jersey)
  • Reflection Writing Rubric  and  Research Project Writing (Carnegie Mellon University)
  • Research Paper Rubric (Cornell College)
  • Assessment Rubric for Student Reflections

AACU VALUE Rubrics

VALUE (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education) is a national assessment initiative on college student learning sponsored by AACU as part of its Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

  • Inquiry and Analysis (*pdf)
  • Critical Thinking (*pdf)
  • Creative Thinking (*pdf)
  • Written Communication (*pdf)
  • Oral Communication (*pdf)
  • Reading (*pdf)
  • Quantitative Literacy (*pdf)
  • Information Literacy (*pdf)
  • Teamwork (*pdf)
  • Problem Solving (*pdf)

Personal and Social Responsibility

  • Civic Engagement (*pdf)
  • Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (*pdf)
  • Ethical Reasoning (*pdf)
  • Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning (*pdf)
  • Global Learning (*pdf)

Integrative and Applied Learning

  • Integrative Learning (*pdf)

Assessing Institution-Wide Diversity

  • Self-Assessment Rubric For the Institutionalization of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Higher Education

IMAGES

  1. 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) ᐅ TemplateLab

    grading rubric for college research paper

  2. Research Paper Grading Rubric

    grading rubric for college research paper

  3. 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) ᐅ TemplateLab

    grading rubric for college research paper

  4. AP Research Paper Rubric for Sample Grading (2)

    grading rubric for college research paper

  5. ENG 102: GRADING RUBRIC for the RESEARCH PAPER

    grading rubric for college research paper

  6. 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) ᐅ TemplateLab

    grading rubric for college research paper

VIDEO

  1. G10 Q4-Week 1: Research Paper and Its Parts #research #qualitativeresearch #quantitativeresearch

  2. CGC RESPONDS TO THE GREAT COMIC GRADING SCAM!! Into. the Void Podcast EP

  3. How to access the discussion post grading rubric default

  4. Seven Days Online workshop on How to write a Quantitative research paper

  5. Rubric Grading for Performances, Projects, and Essays in ALL In Learning

COMMENTS

  1. Example 1

    This rubric is developed for a specific writing assignment; it would need to be revised to describe the expectations for each specific assignment. Research Paper Rubric PDF The paper demonstrates that the author fully understands and has applied concepts learned in the course. Concepts are integrated into the writer's own insights.

  2. Grading Rubric for A Research Paper—Any Discipline

    GRADING RUBRIC FOR A RESEARCH PAPER—ANY DISCIPLINE. *exceptional introduction that grabs interest of reader and states topic. **thesis is exceptionally clear, arguable, well-developed, and a definitive statement. *paper is exceptionally researched, extremely detailed, and historically accurate. **information clearly relates to the thesis.

  3. PDF Research Paper Grading Rubric

    Minimally acceptable: 40-‐‐60%. An adequate accomplishment of task. Somewhat precise language Irregular divisions between the writer's voice and the sources used to support claims Lapses in use of standard American English in grammar and punctuation Lapses in use of ACS formatting

  4. PDF Example of a Grading Rubric for a Term Paper in Any Discipline

    The C paper. Adequate but weaker and less effective, possibly responding less well to assignment. Presents central idea in general terms, often depending on platitudes or cliches. Usually does not acknowledge other views. Shows basic comprehension of sources, perhaps with lapses in understanding.

  5. PDF SAMPLE RUBRIC FOR GRADING A RESEARCH PAPER

    the paper. Paper contains a "roadmap" for the reader. There is a logical flow to the topics/arguments. Conclusion follows clearly from the arguments presented. Thesis is clear and ap-propriate. Thesis fairly well sup-ported. Paper is fairly well orga-nized. Conclusion follows from the rest of the paper. Thesis is fairly clear. Inconsistent ...

  6. Examples of Rubric Creation

    A note on analytic rubrics: If you decide you feel more comfortable grading with an analytic rubric, you can assign a point value to each concept. The drawback to this method is that it can sometimes unfairly penalize a student who has a good understanding of the problem but makes a lot of minor errors.

  7. PDF Research Paper Rubric Name: Date: Score:

    Contents. All required information is discerned with clarity and precision and contains all items listed in Meets category. Contains: application, abstract, research paper, lab report, observation log, reflective essay, guide and rubrics. Contains 5 - 6 of criteria for meets; and /or poorly organized.

  8. PDF Research Paper Rubric.xls

    The central purpose or argument is not consistently clear throughout the paper. The purpose or argument is generally unclear. Content. Balanced presentation of relevant and legitimate information that clearly supports a central purpose or argument and shows a thoughtful, in-depth analysis of a significant topic. Reader gains important insights.

  9. Rubrics

    If an assignment prompt is clearly addressing each of these elements, then students know what they're doing, why they're doing it, and when/how/for whom they're doing it. From the standpoint of a rubric, we can see how these elements correspond to the criteria for feedback: 1. Purpose. 2. Genre.

  10. DOC Homepage

    Essay and Research Paper Grading Rubric. Professor Jay Aronson. Carnegie Mellon University. [email protected]. Excellent Good Needs Improvement Poor F Overall Impression Author directly addresses main question or issue, and adds new insight to the subject not provided in lectures, readings, or class discussions. The author has retained ...

  11. Research Paper Rubric

    Your Name, Teacher's Name, Course Period, Date, Neatly finished-no errors. Evidence of four. Evidence of 3. Evidence of 2 or less. Absent. Thesis Statement. Clearly and concisely states the paper's purpose in a single sentence, which is engaging, and thought provoking. Clearly states the paper's purpose in a single sentence.

  12. Creating and Using Rubrics

    Example 3: Anthropology Writing Assignments This rubric was designed for a series of short writing assignments in anthropology (Carnegie Mellon). Example 4: History Research Paper. This rubric was designed for essays and research papers in history (Carnegie Mellon). Example 1: Capstone Project in Design This rubric describes the components and ...

  13. Rubrics

    Rubrics can be used for a wide array of assignments: papers, projects, oral presentations, artistic performances, group projects, etc. Rubrics can be used as scoring or grading guides, to provide formative feedback to support and guide ongoing learning efforts, or both. Advantages of Using Rubrics

  14. Rubric Examples

    A rubric is a type of scoring guide that assesses and articulates specific components and expectations for an assignment. Rubrics can be used for a variety of assignments: research papers, group projects, portfolios and presentations. Why use rubrics? VALUE Rubrics Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) for improvement of learning and authentic assessment, developed ...

  15. Rubric Best Practices, Examples, and Templates

    Disadvantage of analytic rubrics: Requires more work for instructors writing feedback. Step 3 (Optional): Look for templates and examples. You might Google, "Rubric for persuasive essay at the college level" and see if there are any publicly available examples to start from. Ask your colleagues if they have used a rubric for a similar ...

  16. Examples of Rubrics

    Here are some rubric examples from different colleges and universities, as well as the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) VALUE rubrics. We would also like to include examples from Syracuse University faculty and staff. If you would be willing to share your rubric with us, please click here. By topic Arts

  17. DOC Grading Rubric for Papers (79-201)

    Grading Rubric for Papers (79-201) Marie Norman, Introduction to Anthropology, Carnegie Mellon University. Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, Carnegie Mellon University. Title: Grading Rubric for Papers (79-201) Author: Marie Norman Last modified by: Anne Fay Created Date: 3/8/2007 4:17:00 PM

  18. PDF Rubrics for assessment (10-11-17)

    research questions within our field. 4. Students in the major use the tools and methods of modern biological research. 5. Students in the major demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills, including hypothesis generation and testing. 6. Students in the major demonstrate high-level writing and oral communication skills.

  19. 46 Editable Rubric Templates (Word Format) ᐅ TemplateLab

    A grading rubric template is a type of tool used for assessment. You can use it to express your expectations regarding the work of your students. In it, you'll define what you will assess. You'll also describe the criteria for how you will evaluate their work. You can use this template to articulate what excellent work looks like.

  20. PDF Grading Rubric for Research Paper using MLA Style

    the paper. Very few grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors interfere with reading the paper. Grammatical errors or spelling & punctuation are rare and do not detract from the paper. The paper is free of grammatical errors and spelling & punctuation. 10 points Communication Word choice is informal in tone. Writing is choppy, with many ...

  21. PDF Research Presentation Rubrics

    How to use this rubric: • Self-assessment: Record yourself presenting your talk using your computer's pre-downloaded recording software or by using the coach in Microsoft PowerPoint. Then review your recording, fill in the rubric, and use it to self-assess your work. • Feedback from Colleagues: Present your talk to a mentor or peer(s).