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27 Good Study Habits of Straight-A Students

good study habits, explained below

Study habits refer to the consistent practice and approach to study, on a regular basis, to enhance academic performance.

The good thing about a habit is that once you do it on a regular basis, it becomes easy. So, your job is to get into this habit early. Once you’re into the habit, university becomes easy (well, easier ).

Good study habits that I recommend include getting into the routine of heading to the library (or a similar study space) to study without distractions, chunking your studies by subject, and using spaced repetition for things that require rote memorization .

I also recommend studying with friends – such as by testing one another – whenever possible.

The integration of efficient study habits enhances academic performance and motivation to study . By developing effective study strategies adjusted to your personal learning style, you improve concentration and retention of information – and concentration, more than time spent studying, is found to be a key factor for success (Nonis & Hudson, 2010).

Good Study Habits

1. Time Management Time management refers to being able to efficiently allocate your time so you don’t run out of time, and so you have enough time to allocate to all important tasks. As a basis, you could initiate a dedicated study schedule, specifying the time slots for each subject. For instance, you might want to allot your mornings for theory-heavy subjects like Anatomy, and save the afternoons for practice-oriented subjects like Clinical Skills. Don’t forget to also block time for regular study breaks and social events. This is crucial to prevent burnout and maintain longevity – university is a marathon, not a sprint.

Read Also: 7 Things to do in your First Week of University

2. Using Active Reading Strategies This is the process of engaging with the material by asking questions and drawing connections. Instead of passively reading your texts, you can participate more actively by summarizing the information in your own words, teaching it to someone else, quizzing yourself, or creating visual aids like diagrams and mind maps. As Issa et al. (2012) found, reading relevant information daily is an effective study habit for improving grades.

3. Setting Realistic Goals This strategy involves laying out achievable objectives for each study session or topic. Setting goals not only keeps you focused, but also helps gauge your progress. For example, instead of aiming to read an entire biology textbook in two days, you might target mastering one chapter per day. I recommend setting both short-term study goals and long-term study goals using the SMART Goals method .

4. Prioritization Successful students often prioritize tasks based on their deadlines and degree of importance. You might follow the Eisenhower Box method: divide your tasks into four categories, namely, important and urgent, important but not urgent, not important but urgent, and not important and not urgent. For instance, an upcoming exam translates into an important and urgent task, hence it would be first on your list.

5. Spaced Repetition This strategy involves studying information over incremental intervals instead of cramming it in one sitting. You might review your notes on the day you learn something, then again in a couple of days, then after a week, and so forth. There are even apps like the Anki flashcards app that have a built-in spaced repetition algorithm that can space how often ideas are presented to you.

6. Creating a Suitable Environment Each individual’s ideal study environment may differ based on personal preferences . Some people need complete silence, while others work better with some background noise. If you like silence, the quite section of a library is a good place to start – I recommend making it a habit to go to the library at your university as often as possible. Conversely, if you feel background noise helps you to concentrate, consider studying at a cafe. But the key is to ensure your environment is right for you. As Ogbodo (2010, p. 229) argues: “Where to study is as important as what to study and how to go about studying.”

7. Taking Breaks Integrating regular short breaks into your study pattern can boost your productivity and mental agility because it decreases distractions during focused study time. And this is important. As Walck-Shannon, Rowell and Frey (2021) found, “students reported being distracted about 20% of their study time, and distraction while studying negatively predicted exam performance.” So, let’s avoid that – by splitting our time between strong focus, then rest. Typically, the Pomodoro technique is a popular method for this, where you study for 25 minutes, then take a 5-minute break. After four such cycles, you take a longer break of 15-20 minutes. During your breaks, you can engage in some light activity such as stretching or walking to invigorate yourself.

8. Maintaining Physical Health Eating well, getting regular exercise, and ensuring enough sleep are often overlooked aspects of efficient studying. Research shows that a balanced diet, physical activity, and proper sleep improve cognitive functions , including memory and concentration. You may want to establish a regular sleep schedule, incorporate a balanced diet, and schedule regular exercise sessions each week into your routine.

9. Using Technology Wisely Technology offers a range of tools that can streamline your study process. For instance, you can use apps for time management (e.g., Rescue Time), note-taking (e.g., Evernote), or spaced repetition (e.g., Anki). While these apps can be beneficial, remember to keep checks on screens’ disruptive nature and the habit of digital distraction. As practice, try turning off your phone’s notifications when you study, or set ‘Do Not Disturb’ intervals.

10. Review and Revise Sessions Regular review of study materials aids in long-term retention of information. You can allocate specific time slots each week to revisit old notes, attempt self-test papers or engage in group discussions. For instance, you might dedicate your Sunday mornings to revising everything you’ve covered during the preceding week.

11. Active Writing Transcribing information demands active engagement, thereby reinforcing your understanding and memory of the subject. You might opt to rewrite complex concepts in your own words or diagrammatically represent intricate processes. For example, instead of merely reading about the human circulatory system, consider drawing it out with brief annotations.

12. Seeking Help When Needed Understanding when to seek help is an underrated study habit. If you find yourself struggling with a subject, don’t hesitate to approach your professors, peers, or study groups for clarification. You might also seek online resources such as academic forums or educational websites. Remember, it’s better to clarify doubts initially than to have misconceptions hamper your overall learning.

13. Mindfulness and Focus Mindfulness, or present-moment awareness, can help enhance your comprehension and retention during studying. You could practice mindfulness by removing distractions, concentrating on the task at hand, and making a conscious effort to absorb the material.

14. Integrating Study with Real-Life Scenarios Applying the theoretical knowledge learned during study sessions to real-life instances can facilitate a deeper understanding. You might relate basic principles of economics to household budgeting or chemistry to cooking. This practice can help convert abstract concepts into tangible examples.

15. Regular Self-Assessment Implementing regular exams or quizzes to assess your understanding and memory can be a direct way to monitor progress. You can either use ready-made quizzes available online or design a short assessment yourself. As you answer, mark out the areas you struggled with for further review. This method will help you know where you stand in your preparation and what areas need extra effort.

16. Employing Mnemonics This involves using techniques to retain and retrieve information. The method could be as simple as creating an acronym or conjuring up a relevant mental image. For example, in recalling the taxonomical rank in biology – Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species – you might use the well-known mnemonic phrase: “King Phillip Came Over For Good Soup.” Examples of additional mnemonic techniques include the method of loci and memory linking .

17. Incorporating Understandable Examples Since abstract concepts can be confusing, associating them with relateable analogies can help you grasp the idea. This technique depends heavily on your creativity and could be as simple as linking a literary theme to a popular movie plot. Ensuring your examples make sense to you is vital.

18. Varying Study Methods It is beneficial to avoid monotony and experiment with multiple learning techniques. This can include oscillating between solitary studying and group study sessions, or alternating between text-based learning and audio-visual aids. For instance, following a hefty reading session, you might want to watch a related documentary or podcast on the topic. Switching up strategies not only prevents burnout but also caters to different facets of your learning style.

19. Note-Taking Strategy Effective note-taking is a skill that helps in better understanding and remembrance of knowledge. You should decide a note-taking strategy which could be outlining, mind mapping, or the Cornell method, and stick to it. For example, you might use the Cornell Method, which divides the paper into notes, cues, and a summary section for enhancing retention and review.

20. Regularity and Consistency Consistency is the cornerstone of strong study habits. Establishing a regular routine that allocates specific periods for study each day leads to better academic performance. For instance, studying for two hours per day consistently is more effective than cramming for fourteen hours once a week.

21. Engage All Senses Engaging multiple senses aids in strengthening your memory of the subject matter. This could involve reading aloud, rewriting notes, creating visual aids, or even using software to convert text to speech. The goal is to consume the information through as many sensory channels as possible to maximize retention. For example, if you’re studying foreign vocabulary, you could listen to the pronunciation, read the definition, write the word several times, and visualize an image related to it.

22. Reflective Learning Reflective learning involves regularly taking a few moments to contemplate what you’ve learned. This process ensures you understand the main concepts and helps you evaluate how effectively the learning material has been understood. For instance, after reading a section on World History, take a moment to think about what questions have been answered and what new questions have arisen in your mind about the topic.

23. Preparing for the Next Class Reviewing the material that will be covered in the next class helps make the class more productive and understandable. By having prior knowledge of the topic, you can better participate in class discussions and raise insightful queries. For example, if tomorrow’s Physics class covers Electromagnetic Waves, you might want to read the corresponding chapter tonight.

24. Constructive Procrastination While complete avoidance of procrastination is the goal, sometimes it’s unavoidable. Constructive procrastination involves doing another task that also needs to be done when you feel like procrastinating. If you find yourself unable to study Civil Law, consider switching to another pending task, such as completing your Mathematics assignment. This way, you remain productive while giving in to the urge to procrastinate.

25. Visualization Techniques Visualization involves picturing the information in your mind, which can significantly improve memory and recall. For instance, when studying Anatomy, envisioning the body parts, systems, and processes can enhance your understanding. If you’d like to explore this strategy more, read my article on the visual peg-word system for memorization .

26. Listen to Music Without Lyrics Listening to music while studying is a controversial topic. Some people think it helps them to achieve a flow state, while most research suggests that “ media multitasking ” is a distraction whether we realize it or not (Xu, Wang, & Woods, 2019). Generally, I recommend that if you do like that background nose, try to listen to music without lyrics, like lo-fi playlists from YouTube, which act as background noise and could potentially prevent your mind from wandering.

27. Study with Friends Thalluri (2016) found that “study buddy support groups” significantly support studying. Friends can keep each other accountable and help motivate one another. And, according to social learning theory , working in groups helps us to reinforce knowledge. For example, if you’re talking about the course content with friends, you’ll hear their unique perspectives, which you can critically compare to your own, which augments, supports, positively alters, and strengthens your own perspectives.

Study habits act as the building blocks of your academic journey. Efficient study habits not only ensure better academic performance but also help in gaining lifelong skills like time management, goal-setting, and self-discipline. By adopting effective study habits, you modulate your academic journey to a more favorable and fruitful path.

If you want to dive deeper into getting good study habits, I’d recommend James Clear’s Atomic Habits book – it’s an amazing book for learning to get more productive and optimize your time as a student.

Issa, A.O., Aliyu, M.B., Akangbe, R.B., and Adedeji, A.F. (2012). Reading interest and habits of the federal polytechnic students. International Journal of Learning & Development, 2 (1): 470-486.

Nonis, S. A., & Hudson, G. I. (2010). Performance of college students: Impact of study time and study habits.  Journal of education for Business ,  85 (4), 229-238.

Ogbodo, R. O. (2010). Effective Study Habits in Educational Sector: Counselling Implications.  Edo Journal of Counselling ,  3 (2), 230-242.

Thalluri, J. (2016). Who benefits most from peer support group?–First year student success for Pathology students.  Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences ,  228 , 39-44.

Walck-Shannon, E. M., Rowell, S. F., & Frey, R. F. (2021). To what extent do study habits relate to performance?.  CBE—Life Sciences Education ,  20 (1). doi: https://doi.org/10.1187/cbe.20-05-0091

Xu, S., Wang, Z., & Woods, K. (2019). Multitasking and dual motivational systems: A dynamic longitudinal study.  Human Communication Research ,  45 (4), 371-394. doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/hcr/hqz009

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Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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Top 10 Study Tips to Study Like a Harvard Student

Adjusting to a demanding college workload might be a challenge, but these 10 study tips can help you stay prepared and focused.

Lian Parsons

The introduction to a new college curriculum can seem overwhelming, but optimizing your study habits can boost your confidence and success both in and out of the classroom. 

Transitioning from high school to the rigor of college studies can be overwhelming for many students, and finding the best way to study with a new course load can seem like a daunting process. 

Effective study methods work because they engage multiple ways of learning. As Jessie Schwab, psychologist and preceptor at the Harvard College Writing Program, points out, we tend to misjudge our own learning. Being able to recite memorized information is not the same as actually retaining it. 

“One thing we know from decades of cognitive science research is that learners are often bad judges of their own learning,” says Schwab. “Memorization seems like learning, but in reality, we probably haven’t deeply processed that information enough for us to remember it days—or even hours—later.”

Planning ahead and finding support along the way are essential to your success in college. This blog will offer study tips and strategies to help you survive (and thrive!) in your first college class. 

1. Don’t Cram! 

It might be tempting to leave all your studying for that big exam up until the last minute, but research suggests that cramming does not improve longer term learning. 

Students may perform well on a test for which they’ve crammed, but that doesn’t mean they’ve truly learned the material, says an article from the American Psychological Association . Instead of cramming, studies have shown that studying with the goal of long-term retention is best for learning overall.   

2. Plan Ahead—and Stick To It! 

Having a study plan with set goals can help you feel more prepared and can give you a roadmap to follow. Schwab said procrastination is one mistake that students often make when transitioning to a university-level course load. 

“Oftentimes, students are used to less intensive workloads in high school, so one of my biggest pieces of advice is don’t cram,” says Schwab. “Set yourself a study schedule ahead of time and stick to it.”

3. Ask for Help

You don’t have to struggle through difficult material on your own. Many students are not used to seeking help while in high school, but seeking extra support is common in college.

As our guide to pursuing a biology major explains, “Be proactive about identifying areas where you need assistance and seek out that assistance immediately. The longer you wait, the more difficult it becomes to catch up.”

There are multiple resources to help you, including your professors, tutors, and fellow classmates. Harvard’s Academic Resource Center offers academic coaching, workshops, peer tutoring, and accountability hours for students to keep you on track.  

4. Use the Buddy System 

Your fellow students are likely going through the same struggles that you are. Reach out to classmates and form a study group to go over material together, brainstorm, and to support each other through challenges.

Having other people to study with means you can explain the material to one another, quiz each other, and build a network you can rely on throughout the rest of the class—and beyond. 

5. Find Your Learning Style

It might take a bit of time (and trial and error!) to figure out what study methods work best for you. There are a variety of ways to test your knowledge beyond simply reviewing your notes or flashcards. 

Schwab recommends trying different strategies through the process of metacognition. Metacognition involves thinking about your own cognitive processes and can help you figure out what study methods are most effective for you. 

Schwab suggests practicing the following steps:

  • Before you start to read a new chapter or watch a lecture, review what you already know about the topic and what you’re expecting to learn.
  • As you read or listen, take additional notes about new information, such as related topics the material reminds you of or potential connections to other courses. Also note down questions you have.
  • Afterward, try to summarize what you’ve learned and seek out answers to your remaining questions. 

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6. Take Breaks

The brain can only absorb so much information at a time. According to the National Institutes of Health , research has shown that taking breaks in between study sessions boosts retention. 

Studies have shown that wakeful rest plays just as important a role as practice in learning a new skill. Rest allows our brains to compress and consolidate memories of what we just practiced. 

Make sure that you are allowing enough time, relaxation, and sleep between study sessions so your brain will be refreshed and ready to accept new information.

7. Cultivate a Productive Space

Where you study can be just as important as how you study. 

Find a space that is free of distractions and has all the materials and supplies you need on hand. Eat a snack and have a water bottle close by so you’re properly fueled for your study session. 

8. Reward Yourself

Studying can be mentally and emotionally exhausting and keeping your stamina up can be challenging.

Studies have shown that giving yourself a reward during your work can increase the enjoyment and interest in a given task.

According to an article for Science Daily , studies have shown small rewards throughout the process can help keep up motivation, rather than saving it all until the end. 

Next time you finish a particularly challenging study session, treat yourself to an ice cream or  an episode of your favorite show.

9. Review, Review, Review

Practicing the information you’ve learned is the best way to retain information. 

Researchers Elizabeth and Robert Bjork have argued that “desirable difficulties” can enhance learning. For example, testing yourself with flashcards is a more difficult process than simply reading a textbook, but will lead to better long-term learning. 

“One common analogy is weightlifting—you have to actually “exercise those muscles” in order to ultimately strengthen your memories,” adds Schwab.

10. Set Specific Goals

Setting specific goals along the way of your studying journey can show how much progress you’ve made. Psychology Today recommends using the SMART method:

  • Specific: Set specific goals with an actionable plan, such as “I will study every day between 2 and 4 p.m. at the library.”  
  • Measurable: Plan to study a certain number of hours or raise your exam score by a certain percent to give you a measurable benchmark.
  • Realistic: It’s important that your goals be realistic so you don’t get discouraged. For example, if you currently study two hours per week, increase the time you spend to three or four hours rather than 10.
  • Time-specific: Keep your goals consistent with your academic calendar and your other responsibilities.

Using a handful of these study tips can ensure that you’re getting the most out of the material in your classes and help set you up for success for the rest of your academic career and beyond. 

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About the Author

Lian Parsons is a Boston-based writer and journalist. She is currently a digital content producer at Harvard’s Division of Continuing Education. Her bylines can be found at the Harvard Gazette, Boston Art Review, Radcliffe Magazine, Experience Magazine, and iPondr.

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Develop Good Habits

13 Effective Study Habit Examples: Improve Your Study Routine

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Are you a student looking to build effective study habits? Is your study routine not as effective as it could be?

Maybe it’s time to follow a new study schedule that will help you better retain material, manage your time, help you retain information and even help you improve your concentration and focus.

Here are 13 good study habit examples you can use to enhance your learning style, develop a quality study routine and start achieving your educational goals . ​

Let’s get to it.

Table of Contents

#1 – Keep Track of Important Dates

Carrying different dates around in your head is a surefire way to forget or start muddling up important dates. Getting a planner or calendar is an easy way to store this vital information.

A calendar or planner allows you to keep track of due dates, examinations, and various tasks to complete for different projects – having this on paper eases your mental load.

A good planner allows you to keep track of everything you need to know and also allows you to organize your own time easily. This leads to more effective studying and less wasted time.

To get started, here are our recommended study planners .

#2 – Know Your Dominant Learning Style

It’s important to know that there are many different styles of learning and each person will retain information better in different ways.

  • As you can see, visual learners learn best when pictures, images, and spatial understanding is used. (Check out our collection of vision board ideas for students .)
  • Auditory learners prefer using music, sounds or both.
  • Kinesthetic learners prefer a more physical style of learning through using the body, sense of touch and hands.
  • Logical learners desire to use reasoning, logic and systems. (And like answering logic questions !)
  • Verbal learners will prefer using words in writing and speech.
  • Social learners will prefer to learn with other people or in groups.
  • Solitary learners are able to learn best alone.

This infographic provides a good overview of the seven learning styles. You can use it as a quick reference guide.

Once you have figured out which style of learning works best for you, it will help you determine how to study, where to study, when to study, what distracts you and what study aids you should use.

Consistency gets results!

Make your study habit part of your morning routine so that it becomes an effortless part of your day. Get excited about learning instead of dreading your study schedule.

To learn more about the different learning styles, read our article on the Learning Retention Pyramid .

#3 – Create and Write Down Realistic Study Goals

If your goal is too big to achieve, then you might be setting yourself up for failure and this will also not help motivate you to study and accomplish your SMART student goals , or if you're in college, your SMART college student goals .

Once you know your learning style, do a self-assessment of your current study habits and your current grades.

Here are some questions to ask yourself that will help you create realistic goals and come up with a plan for good study habits.

  • When do you usually study and for how long?
  • Do you find that it is effective?
  • Are you happy with your grades?
  • What subjects do you need to focus on or are having difficulty with?
  • What grades do you need to have in order to pass?
  • What are your personal commitments and priorities?

Here's our roundup of the best (and free) study plan templates to help make sure you stay on top of your academic goals.

After answering and reflecting on these questions, you’ll be able to see areas where you need to focus.

Maybe you are not spending enough time doing the right amount of work necessary each day or perhaps you choose to study late at night when you’re not as alert and energetic.

If you have noticed your grades are slipping in certain courses then perhaps you need to hire a tutor to help you with those subjects.

Social commitments or spending time on social media can eat away the hours. While it’s fun to socialize, pruning back some time spent here to study can pay off hugely in the long run.

Use the SMART method when setting up goals: set Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound goals.

Check out this guide to learn the 13 steps to write and set SMART goals .

#4 – Make Study Time a Part of Your Daily Routine

If cramming all of your study time into a few long days isn’t working for you then it’s time to try something new (and way less stressful). Make time for studying every single day, with or without exams coming up. 

Remember that consistency is key and once you start getting into good study habits, it will become a routine and that you will be able to maintain throughout the school year. Self-discipline is key.

Check your schedule for the week or month, and see where you have free time or what you can discard:

  • Establish your priorities – whether that’s chores, must-attend activities, or appointments. By looking at your calendar, and setting up your priorities, you will be able to schedule your study sessions for the month.
  • Choose blocks of time when you feel you’re at your best.
  • Try to stay committed to your new study schedule.

Some people work best in the mornings, and others, at night. If you’re unsure when you work best, try studying at different times of the day to see which suits you and your body clock best.

READ: The Study Plan Schedule Strategy (That Actually Works!)

good study habits in students

Once you have found which blocks of time work best, you can always add in additional time to study by waking up an hour early to review your notes, or an hour later if you study better at night.

Make sure you build flexibility into your schedule. Your calendar and schedule will change because of unforeseen events. Be ready to plan around some things that come your way and still make time to study.

#5 – How to Structure Your Daily Study Routine

The following are some great ideas to structure your study routine. These work best when you are using a mixture of learning styles as mentioned above.

Start with watching or attending your lectures, and then doing an additional one to three hours of personal study (with breaks) to review your notes on those lectures.

This way, you are using both auditory and visual learning styles as well as repetition, which will help fix what you’re learning into memory.

Start with the difficult topics and subjects first, so that you are not going to put them off until a later date. Shorter study sessions are more effective for subjects you find difficult.

To get started, we recommend you time block your study session so it looks like this:

  • Schedule study sessions in two, 30-minute to one hour blocks
  • Take short 5- to 10-minute breaks in between.
  • When you take breaks, you allow your mind to rest, revitalize and be ready for more learning.

If you want to see what this looks like then here are 17 free study plan templates .

#6 – Establish a Study Zone

Establish a study zone, especially if you're engaged in virtual learning . Some people like quiet places, others will need a little bit of background noise.

Which one do you prefer?

If there is too much going on at your house then maybe it’s time to think about going to the library or a coffee bar and using headphones.

Make sure you have the necessary items with you when you study. You’ll need a desk that’s big enough to spread your books, laptop, paper, and supplies.

Using the best study lighting is also important for everyone when studying. If you want to preserve your eyesight and maximize your time and energy, then choose lighting that will not cause eyestrain or fatigue so you can keep your study session effective at any time of the day.

Don’t be afraid to establish boundaries in your study zone. Let anyone living with you know when your door is closed, it means you do not want to be disturbed. Try not to be distracted by  phone calls or texts, as this breaks your focus.

Girl reading in a study zone

It’s best to find not just one place to study, but at least two or three additional options . This way, you will have a backup plan in case your main study area can’t be used.

A change of environment is said to improve concentration and creativity so even if you don’t need to change places, it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

While you establish rules for others, you also need to establish rules for yourself:

  • Get rid of all distractions.
  • Don’t choose a place where you will be tempted to watch TV, check in with your smartphone, or study in a high-traffic area where people will be coming and going.
  • Choose to study offline as much as possible. There are way too many distractions that are only a click away.
  • If you need to check something, write it down and check it after your study session is over.

Also, here are a few helpful study tips to get the most out of your study session:

  • Avoid eating a heavy meal before studying. A heavy meal can make you sleepy which will make it more difficult for you to study. Choose to eat small and frequent meals instead.
  • Move or take a short walk before sitting down to study. Stretching, walking or even dancing will help prepare your body and mind to be more receptive to learning.
  • Prioritize your assignment dates: write down every assignment or task when you first hear about it instead of just “remembering” it. We live in such a fast paced world that’s full of distractions and it’s easy and normal to forget things.
  • Include important details such as page numbers, due dates, test dates, pointers, or anything else that might be helpful when writing assignments down.

One way to make prioritizing your tasks simple is to organize your study notes by using colors or labels. Whether you use an online notebook or a binder, developing your own color-coding system will help you (and your thoughts) get organized.

You can use colors to color-code your subjects, projects and even teachers. You can also use different colored pens, highlighters, sticky notes, folders and labels.

Colors and labels will also help you later when you when you need to review your notes, the colorful sections will help those notes stand out and be unique and memorable.

If you struggle to understand complex study material, using the Feynman technique can help you learn faster and more efficiently.

#7 – Take Great Notes

Do you find yourself struggling with taking good notes?

Develop your note-taking skills to aid what you’re in the process of learning. When you review your notes, they should help you study and remember the most essential information.

You don’t need to take notes of everything ! If the teacher keeps repeating something or has written down any important terms – you should make note of this.

Your note-taking style might also depend on your learning style like we mentioned above. Perhaps you might need to draw little diagrams in your notes if you are more of a visual learner.

It is important to take notes to study at peak efficiency

An auditory learner will learn better if you record the class discussions and lectures, or you can listen to informational and educational podcasts related to the subject. Your notes do not need to be handwritten if your learning style is auditory.

A good study routine plays to the strengths of your learning style.

Another fun way to remember things is to use mnemonics for better memory recall . For any type of list, steps, stages or parts you can use mnemonic devices to help you retain information. Mnemonic types include: music, name, expression, rhyme, spelling and more.

(If you're looking for another way to improve your memory, check out these memory games .)

#8 – Review Your Notes

Before and after your study sessions, you should always skim your notes from the recent lesson or topic you studied before starting on a new one. Reviewing your notes once before going to bed will also help to cement new knowledge into your brain.

You can get the most out of your notes by breaking up the topic you’re learning into shorter tasks. Spending over an hour reviewing your notes is counter-productive but shorter review blocks are a powerful learning strategy.

Finally, if you have piles of notes and are struggling to find the ones you need – you can digitize your notes! This resource tells you how to digitize your notes in 3 easy steps .

#9 – Use Technology Wisely During Class

If you are using a laptop for note-taking in class, then make sure you are still able to focus and pay attention. Laptops and phones can bring down your grade . Don’t believe us? This Michigan State University article shows why surfing the web in class is a bad idea.

You don’t want to get into the habit of surfing the web, checking social media, or using your smartphone in class. if you’re frequently checking the internet or your smartphone when studying, then you’re likely to sabotage your own learning efforts in the classroom.

#10 – Consider Joining a Study Group

Social learners should consider forming a study group. Study groups help you to remember and learn more effectively because you can ask questions to clarify difficult points. You also get the added advantage of discovering how others learned a subject or solved a problem.

One of the best benefits of joining a study group is that you will be able to ask, discuss, debate , and quiz each other on the topics at hand. You could even keep your study group online if traveling to one spot won’t work well for everyone.

In order to find study groups that will work for your needs; find people as dedicated as you are. You don’t want to study with a group that isn’t devoted and willing to work hard.

The study group's numbers shouldn’t be too big, or else it becomes more of a party. Having around 6 people in a group allows you all to benefit without it becoming distracting and counter-productive.

Study groups of college students

Exchange contact details or establish a means of communicating and decide on a location to host your study group. You will have to organize the group to fit everyone’s schedule to get the most benefit.

The most important thing is creating the logistics of the group – you meet up at the same place and have a reliable schedule. You should also determine how you’re going to communicate (you could use Slack, Whatsapp, etc) this keeps everyone in the loop and makes it easier to meet up.

The best study groups are not a competition. Some members of the group might pick up things faster than others, but this is an opportunity to demonstrate your own learning and fill in any gaps in your knowledge.

#11 – Ask for Help

There are plenty of resources available for anyone who might be stuck. It’s never a bad idea to ask for help and assistance and make the most out of the resources that are there to provide it.

Professors are usually more than willing to help any student who is struggling with a topic ( as it shows an honest effort to learn what they’re teaching). They can also help to explain a subject in a different light if your notes aren’t making sense.

You can also leverage the help of a tutor if you’re struggling with a specific topic. A tutor can help you in a one-to-one setting – which is especially valuable as they can cater the topic you’re struggling with to your learning style.

#12 – Get Enough Sleep and Rest

Studying when you’re sleepy is ineffective. If your body is telling you that you’re tired, then have a nap or go to bed early.

A good night’s sleep will help you understand and remember information better. It is also much less stressful to take an exam or attend a class when you feel well rested and alert.

If you’re finding that you are getting stressed out or tired, reflect back on your study schedule and priorities.

student sleeping in class | importance of good nights sleep to study and learning

Make sure that you have dedicated time for rest and de-stressing. You can’t be a study machine 24/7 and taking some time away from learning is a great way to relax your mind.

Good study habits require you to be fresh and sharp. A good night's sleep is far more effective than a night cramming for a test could ever be.

If you want some handy tips this guide will cover 17 healthy ways to fall asleep earlier .

#13 – Create a Daily Study Timetable

Make sure you track your grades along with your study hours and lesson notes to see if your new studying techniques are helping.

If you find that it is not helpful, then it’s time to re-prioritize your schedule to fit in more time for studying and re-examine your goals for success:

  • Remember that throughout school, work and life, you will always need to be learning something.
  • When you have set up the proper studying techniques and note-taking skills, you are giving yourself one of the greatest gifts possible, the ability to learn.
  • Don’t burn yourself out studying too hard all of the time. It’s important to find a little time to relax, as being too stressed can negatively impact your learning.
  • Don’t forget to play to your strengths, and explore different methods of learning if one thing isn’t working for you. The most important thing is to never give up.

Final Thoughts on Good Study Habits

You can use your morning routine to set yourself up for success in your learning efforts. When you start applying and practicing your study habits you will see a big difference in the quality of your learning.

Take a look at this study plan schedule strategy if you want to beat procrastination and make any learning project much easier.

Looking for more ways to improve your learning ability? Here's our post on how to learn anything fast!

Finally, if you want a PROVEN method to mastering your next test, then take this short masterclass on how to study for exams and getting excellent grades .

A good study routine can help you learn how to study effectively and build good 11 Good Study Habits for Students

25 thoughts on “13 Effective Study Habit Examples: Improve Your Study Routine”

Reading this post I noticed some underlying principles, useful in developing good habits in any area: -know thyself -break your goals into disciplines -focus -take a proper care of your body -track your results and tune your methods

Hi SJ – good stuff, as usual. thanks for the post.

I am a big fan of having a good study routine. Personally, it was one of those little things that have made a big difference, not only to my grades when I was a student, but also later in my life.

In my opinion, the key to success is also to keep the motivation up and focus on intrinsic rewards (rather than extrinsic): the road to mastery, your purpose/mission and achieving the milestones toward your big goal. Tracking your progress is a great way of keeping the focus on your intrinsic motivation.

I just wanted to add one more thing to the section on creating a study routine: make it enjoyable. How? set it up the way you can look forward to it. For instance, I do it in the morning, before my family gets up: and it’s my best time of the day (peak productivity), my ‘me time’, my favorite cup of coffee, and I really enjoy it. I still get up at 5.15am, even though I’m not at the uni anymore. I always find something to learn – I’ve done many MOOCs, and other courses. I don’t HAVE to, but I do it for the joy of learning.

SJ, love your books. Could I get the contact info for your designer (I’ve heard you’re willing to share that.). Also, I do a podcast for traders with about 20,000 listeners and would love to interview you about “waking up happy” and morning routines sometime.

My contact info is rob at robbooker.com

First of all, I would love to do your podcast. It is an honor. Shoot me an email at stevescottsite AT gmail DOT com and we will set up a time that is good for both of us.

Re: Cover Designer: The person I use is Kyle. He charges around $150 for a cover design. If you’d like to use a certain graphic, then you’d need to purchase it off a website (I use iStockPhoto.com for this.) What Kyle provides is the basic, “Kindle-Ready” cover. That means if you need the design converted to a paperback version, that’s something he charges extra for.

This is a great post SJ!

Habit 1 resonated with me so much and because it is very true that each of us have his or her own comfortable learning style. I remember back in high school and college, I used to study for major exams just after midnight. I will eat early and make sure to be in bed by 6 or 7PM. I will sleep until 12AM to 1AM and then get up and study with a cup of coffee right by my side. I love the tranquility of those hours. Place is quiet, except for the sound of barking dogs so I was able to focus.

Thanks for sharing!

That is an interesting way of studying. I also love that quite time when no one is awake. It really is a good time to get things done!

What’s the name of your editor? Can you provide a link? I assume he or she is on elance

I am writing these comments a few dozen times, Idk why but the commenst plugin doesnt approve my website? About the goal topic, I want to add that there is a book titled Goal suck and James Altucher says goals will fail you when themes will help you succeed.

Sorry, comment was sitting in my “approve” queue. Once and a while it wordpress drops people in there, even though they have had approved comments before. I will shoot you an email with editor info shortly.

Goals suck. That is a Matt Stone book. I know that guy. I agree, mostly. Goals are essential and vital, IMO. But spending too much time focused on goals and not enough on doing is a recipe for failure. Like many other things moderation is the key to using them with success.

This is nice and effective post SJ. Thanks a lot.I love to learn and again thanks for the precious 11 study habits.Thanks!!!

I am really very thankful to you for such 11tips for studies.

What are some of the benefits of having a good study timetable and a good time schedule?

Yes, I agree. I’m studying for a public tender in my country. Ihaven’t girlfriend, for I need time. Will be do I doing the right thing? I need help you all. It’s not nice to live without a partner, but i’m trying the impossible. Am I toward the right way? This is my doubt.

See you!!!!!!!

I think it is best to always work on yourself first. The women will come in time, and it is a lot easier to get/keep them with a good job.

I really liked this article, it was really refreshing! You did a great job writing it, and I can tell you did your research. All of these tips have the potential to help you utilize your study time better. However, it is a good idea to try various things until you hit on the exact combination of factors that allow you to develop good study habits and ultimate success in your future.

Good information. I’ve written an article about effective study habits. The techniques of an effective way of studying the lessons are based on cognitive science studies. Maybe the article can add to the information you have here. If you want you can visit http://psychlens.com/effective-study-habits/ . Thanks a lot for sharing this wonderful piece of information.

-Some info that I found helpful, was to not eat a big meal before studying, because it will cause you not to focus. -Something that I will do this year, is use study habits that work for me/I like. For ex: I like visual studying/videos. -a tip of my own, is to use flash cards.

wow this is amazing, things i took for granted or less important are things that are helpful, it changed my mentality toward reading, this is great, thanks for the tips.

I am not good at study and you written a long essay , if I good at study why should i searched for good such kind of tips looking such tips which change my life towards study , please give some good and interactive tips which really helps .

Regards, AJ

Very well written and useful. I like how you distinguish different ways for people because we all are very different.

‘As you can see, visual learners learn best when pictures, images, and spatial understanding is used. Auditory learners prefer using music, sounds or both. Kinesthetic learners prefer a more physical style of learning through using the body, sense of touch and hands. Logical learners desire to use reasoning, logic and systems. Verbal learners will prefer using words in writing and speech. Social learners will prefer to learn with other people or in groups. Solitary learners are able to learn best alone.’ That’s thoughtful.

Thanks for explaining these 7 types of learning to us. Each student will have different statistics. of learning. But the only thing depends is how you learn and effectively implement the same in your learning. One must isolate yourself from all your distractions. One must not waste time too much. And also one must find the best time to study. You gave nice tips.

Wonderful post. These habits are ones that all of us should use but we sometimes forget in the rush of every day work. A great list to keep nearby and remind yourself to slow down and pay attention. Thanks.

Wow! Really great post. The 4th one is really important. When I was a kid, I used to study continuously but after sometimes this is quite difficult for me to remember anything. That’s why I love Pomodoro technique. Study for a while and take 5-10 minute rest.

You also discussed study zone and style of learning. This really important because a learning environment can help us to learn quickly as well as effectively.

Thanks for Sharing!

SJ, I genuinely liked this one. very interesting and of course knowledgeable too.. thank you so much as i am a bit (not a bit ,very very much) lazy . it was good though

keep motivating!!!!!!!!!!!

It’s actually very difficult in this active life to listen news on Television, thus I just use internet for that reason, and get the most recent information.

Comments are closed.

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Education Articles & More

How to help your students develop positive habits, small habits repeated regularly can help students cultivate character strengths like patience, gratitude, and kindness..

Most students likely connect the term “habits” to their study habits. In fact, for many students the term “study habits” probably gives the notion of habits a negative vibe.

But there is another type of habit that is important for the well-being and positive growth of students: habits that build their character strengths , such as patience, gratitude, and service to others. For example, the habit cue that helps students practice patience before spontaneously sending that angry tweet, or a daily habit of writing down what they are grateful for. I call these “positive habits.”

good study habits in students

As a researcher and president of Character.org, I want to make the case that every child and teen, before graduating from elementary school, middle school, or high school, should be able to demonstrate and explain how they have formed and consistently practice a positive habit—especially one they intrinsically want to develop.

Positive habits help students achieve the “character goals” they have set for themselves, such as being a person of integrity or someone who strives to be kind and helpful to others. It is difficult for me to imagine any student becoming their best possible self without developing a wide range of positive habits.

As a starting point, here are five concepts to teach students about habits that will help them build productive skills and meaningful practices into their lives.

1. You are your habits

The research is clear: 40-50% of all our actions are done out of habit. Each of us has our morning habits, as well as our eating and bedtime habits. Simply put, our lives run on habits.

Our challenge as educators is to encourage students to understand that their habits shape who they are and the sort of person they want to become. For example, for many years one of my children handed in assignments that were filled with errors because he had not yet developed the positive habit of checking his homework before handing it in. Only later in life did he learn the wisdom of practicing the character strength of carefulness.

James Clear, author of Atomic Habits , hit the mark when he suggested that the best way to change who you are is to change what you do.

2. How we form habits

Most students learn about Newton’s three laws of motion in eighth grade. But I can’t seem to find any curriculum in the United States where eighth graders learn about the science of habit formation. But they should.

Every student should learn about the “ habit loop .” Whether it’s a good or bad habit, the mechanics of a habit are the same:

Cue > Craving > Response > Reward

Cues spark our habits, and our cravings are the motivating forces behind every habit. Finally, the response delivers the reward (the desired thought or action that gives us relief from the craving). In short, we are still captives to our “lizard brain.” We remain creatures who crave instant gratification.

This process is fairly straightforward for everyday habits: For example, when a student comes home from school (cue), they might experience a spike in dopamine as they start looking for a snack (craving), and then indulge (response) in the salty, crunchy reward of a bag of Fritos. Here’s what the habit loop might look like for a positive habit: Every day when a student comes home from school, she calls her grandmother to find out how she is feeling. Hearing the cheerfulness in her grandmother’s voice is the student’s positive reward. 

Researchers are also beginning to discover that habits persist even when we don’t value the reward as much as we once did (or even when the reward is no longer available). That’s good news for those of us who believe in the power of positive habits. After consistently practicing these habits, they become part of our identity.

3. Stable cues are the key to forming a positive habit

Here’s the one indispensable “habit principle” I’d want my students to learn and practice: Create cue X, for action Y . For example, imagine a student has decided they want to learn how to play the guitar (the action) right after they finish their homework (the cue). The key to creating this new habit or routine is for the student to repeat this activity every day —as soon as they finish studying.

Other stable cues might include waking up or going to bed, brushing teeth, or eating meals—any actions that happen regularly that students can attach a habit to.

Researchers are learning that stable habit cues are essential to organizing our mental space. Over time, repetition reorganizes our brain and becomes its own reward.

4. Four “habit hacks” that work

S. J. Scott recently wrote a book titled Habit Stacking . The idea is that we should link together a harder habit to an easier habit. For example, encouraging students to do their chores (a harder habit) while listening to music (an easier habit). 

Books About Habits

Atomic Habits : An amazing book by James Clear. Check out his awesome 3-2-1 newsletter .

Good Habits, Bad Habits : Professor Wendy Wood packs more research in her book than I thought possible. As Angela Duckworth writes, she truly is the world’s most foremost expert on habit formation.

The Power of Habit : Thank you Charles Duhigg for jumpstarting our contemporary study and practice of habits.

How to Change : Professor Katy Milkman co-directs the Behavior Change for Good Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. I loved her chapter on how to overcome our “lazy” habits.

A second hack is leveraging the power of commitment . The reality is that all of us, at one time or another, have broken a promise we’ve made to ourselves. That’s why we may need to share our habit plan with someone who will hold us accountable, such as a friend, parent, or teacher. Making a commitment to someone we know and trust is often the fuel we need to develop a positive habit.

A third hack is discovering our habit tendency . Developed by author Gretchen Rubin, the core idea is that each of us needs to understand more acutely how well we respond to internal and external expectations. While some people absolutely need accountability for habits, other people must understand why the habit is important before they feel motivated to pursue it.

Finally, when it comes to habit formation, every student should learn about the power of positive affirmations . Refuting our negative self-talk with positive self-talk is a “habit hack” that simply works. For example, students can create the positive mental habit of repeating to themselves, “I got this…I can do this.”

5. Setting goals and sheer willpower aren’t enough

Emerging research is shattering our long-held myths that setting goals and exercising self-control are the twin peaks of habit formation. Intentions alone don’t change behaviors. Moreover, willpower is a muscle that depletes over time. No one can lead a life full of self-denial.

In addition to having long-term goals, students need to “plan” their habits. The research is clear: Preparation is the key . As the saying goes, “Failing to plan is planning to fail.” Habit planning is far more important than motivation and willpower.

Creating a new positive habit is form of human engineering that requires students to discover their optimal cue/action pattern ( if X, then Y ), as well as the intellectual humility to anticipate a weakness or flaw in their habit design. For example, some schools encourage students to develop their own daily habit of gratitude. Students would have to identify a cue/action pattern that works best for them (in the morning or before bedtime), as well as to think critically on what could prevent them from developing their gratitude habit.

Habits are about getting 1% better every day. Aristotle got it right when he wrote that “we are what we repeatedly do.”

Yet recent research tells us that educators overlook the role of habits in student self-regulation. That’s why it’s time for parents and educators, especially during these stress-filled times, to work together to help all students harness the energy and power of positive habits.

Let’s imagine a future where 12th graders are talking to eighth graders about habits, with the older students sharing one positive habit they now consistently practice. Or where every student, at the beginning of the school year, is encouraged to share with their teachers and peers one habit they would like to strengthen by winter break. These are just a few ideas to inspire and equip young people to intrinsically form their own habits of mind, heart, and action.

I’d love to learn your ideas and suggestions to help our students form a habit mindset. Please reach out to me at [email protected].

About the Author

Arthur Schwartz

Arthur Schwartz

Arthur Schwartz, Ed.D. , is president of Character.org. He studies moral courage during adolescence.

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10 Highly Effective Study Habits of Successful Students

good study habits in students

‍ The education journey is about the knowledge we seek and the techniques we use to acquire that knowledge. Studying effectively is a crucial part of this journey. It's what separates successful students from the rest. 

How we approach our studies, the strategies we adopt, and the habits we build significantly influence our performance, understanding, and overall learning experience. This article will provide a detailed guide on 10 highly effective study habits that successful students swear by.

Recognizing the importance of study habits could be the transformative factor you need if you're looking to boost your learning process, improve your academic performance, or turn the often tedious task of studying into a more enjoyable experience.

Top 10 Study Habits to Know

Here, we explore the top 10 study habits that can help you optimize your learning, boost your retention, and excel in your academic endeavors.

1. Set Specific Goals

The first step towards effective studying is setting specific goals. Successful students don't just study; they have a clear purpose for each session. They use SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-bound) goals to give their studies direction and focus. 

For instance, instead of having a vague goal like 'study chemistry,' they would set a specific goal like 'complete and understand chapter 5 of the chemistry textbook by the end of the day'. This provides a clear objective, making studying more productive and less overwhelming.

Set goals graphic

2. Use Active Learning Techniques

Active learning techniques promote active engagement with the study material instead of passive reading or listening. Techniques such as summarizing information in your own words, teaching the material to someone else, or applying the learned knowledge in real-life scenarios are highly effective. 

They force students to think deeply about the material, facilitating a better understanding and long-term knowledge retention.

3. Employ the Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro technique is a time management strategy that helps maintain focus and prevent burnout. It involves studying for a set amount of time (usually 25 minutes), followed by a short break (usually 5 minutes).

After completing four "Pomodoros," take a longer break. This cycle helps to maintain high levels of concentration without fatiguing the mind.

4. Create a Dedicated Study Space

Environment plays a significant role in our ability to focus. Successful students often have a dedicated study space that is clean, quiet, and free from distractions. This space is solely used for studying, which helps the mind associate it with focus and productivity. 

A good study space also includes all the necessary resources for studying, reducing interruptions to fetching materials. 

desk on laptop

5. Regular Review and Self-Assessment

Successful students understand that learning is a continuous process. They regularly review their study material to solidify their understanding and prevent forgetting. 

Additionally, they frequently assess their comprehension through self-quizzes or practice tests. This habit  reinforces what they've learned and helps identify areas  to improve on.

6. Utilize Technology

Technology provides countless resources and tools to enhance studying in the digital age significantly. The possibilities are vast, from educational apps that simplify complex concepts to online platforms offering free courses. 

Successful students leverage these resources to make studying more interactive, engaging, and effective.

student using iPad to study

7. Practice Time Management

Time management is a crucial habit that extends beyond studying. It involves effectively planning and organizing your time to balance study time with other responsibilities such as extracurricular activities, part-time jobs, or socializing. 

They allocate sufficient time for each subject, break down large tasks into manageable chunks, and avoid procrastination. Most importantly, they ensure that their schedule includes time for relaxation to avoid burnout.

8. Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle

Physical health significantly influences cognitive functioning. Regular exercise boosts brain health, a balanced diet provides the necessary nutrients for the brain, and sufficient sleep improves memory and concentration. 

Successful students understand this interconnectedness and incorporate a healthy lifestyle into their routines. They prioritize their health and studies, resulting in optimal cognitive functioning and overall well-being.

9. Participate in Study Groups

Study groups provide a collaborative learning environment that can greatly enhance understanding and retention of knowledge. Discussing topics with peers allows students to gain different perspectives, clarify doubts, and reinforce their understanding. 

Successful students often participate in or form study groups for subjects they find challenging, harnessing the  group’s collective knowledge to enhance their learning.

study group

10. Cultivate a Growth Mindset

Finally, successful students cultivate a growth mindset. They believe in their ability to learn and grow, viewing challenges as opportunities for improvement rather than obstacles. 

They understand that learning involves effort and persistence; difficulties or failures do not deter them.Instead, they see them as an integral part of the learning process, fostering resilience and adaptability that contribute to their academic success.

plant in hand

The Importance of Good Study Habits

Effective study habits form the cornerstone of effective learning. They provide a roadmap to navigate the often challenging terrain of education. These habits help students understand and retain information more effectively, reducing the need for last-minute cramming and stress  associated with studying.

Furthermore, good study habits instill a positive attitude towards education. They promote time management skills and nurture a lifelong love for learning. By making studying more manageable and less overwhelming, these habits encourage students to view education as a journey of exploration and discovery rather than a chore.

Good study habits also have benefits beyond academic performance. They develop skills such as organization, perseverance, and problem-solving, which are invaluable in all areas of life.

Additionally, they can increase a student's confidence and self-efficacy, leading to better overall well-being and personal development. 

At their core, the importance of study habits is not solely confined to academic enhancement and better grades. Rather, these habits are vital in fostering personal growth and equipping students with the skills necessary for success in their future careers and personal lives.

FAQs: Effective Study Habits

Here are  the most frequently asked questions about effective study habits, offering insights and advice to enhance your learning experience.

1. What Effective Study Habits Are Important for Successful Learning?

Several effective study habits contribute to successful learning. These include;

  • Setting specific goals : This gives you direction in your study sessions.
  • Using active learning techniques : Helps you engage deeply with the material.
  • Implementing the Pomodoro technique : Helps you maintain focus; creating a dedicated study space to reduce distractions.
  • Conducting regular review : And self-assessment to solidify understanding. 
  • Utilizing technology : Enhances your learning experience. 
  • Practicing time management : Balances study time with other responsibilities.
  • Maintaining a healthy lifestyle : Ensures optimal cognitive function.
  • Participating in study groups : Helps you gain a different perspective. 
  • Cultivating a growth mindset : Fosters resilience and adaptability.

Implementing these habits can help a student achieve academic success. 

2. How Do I Keep Myself Motivated To Study?

Maintaining motivation to study can sometimes be challenging, but there are several strategies that can help. 

  • Set achievable goals and reward yourself upon completion
  • Maintain a positive mindset and remind yourself of the purpose of your studies
  • Understand the value and relevance of what you're learning
  • Consistency is key; stick to your study schedule
  • Even when motivation is low, continue with your study routine
  • Progress, no matter how small, is still progress

3. How Can I Calm My Mind and Focus on Studying?

Calming the mind and improving focus is critical for effective studying. Techniques such as mindfulness meditation, deep breathing exercises, and yoga can help relax the mind, reduce stress, and improve concentration. 

Additionally, creating a clean and quiet study space free from distractions can enhance focus. Regular breaks during study sessions using techniques like the Pomodoro method can also prevent fatigue and maintain concentration.

Lastly, maintaining a healthy lifestyle by getting enough sleep, exercising regularly, and eating a balanced diet can  improve mental clarity and focus.

Final Thoughts

Adopting effective study habits is a journey that requires consistency, patience, and adaptability. Every student is unique, and there's no one-size-fits-all approach to studying. What works for one person might not work for another, and that's okay. 

Experimenting with different strategies and finding what works best for you is important.

Remember, the ultimate goal is to become a successful student and cultivate a love for learning and personal growth. The habits you develop now will help you in your academic journey and equip you with skills and attitudes that will benefit you in your future professional and personal life.

Studying  is about more than just improving grades; it's about becoming a lifelong learner. So, embark on this journey of self-improvement, and watch as you transform into a successful student and beyond. The journey might be challenging, but the rewards are worth it.

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good study habits in students

Studying is about finding a right balance between concentration, understanding, retention, and rest. And, just like any task that taxes your energy—be it physical or mental—it is often just as difficult to get started as it is to engage in the task itself.

But don't despair! Whether you need to study for just one test, or want to learn how to study over the long haul and retain a whole term's worth of information, we've got you covered. We'll explain exactly how to study better, helping you revamp both your daily and long-term study habits and giving you the best study tips for managing your time and keeping your focus as you actually study.

And, once you've mastered these study techniques, we'll also show you how to prepare yourself for test day so you can do your very best when the chips are down. So let's get to it!

Building Good Study Habits

Again, exerting both mental energy and physical energy is difficult and many find it tough to keep up over the long term. But a proper approach will help ease the way and keep your studying strong for years to come.

To lay a healthy study foundation and avoid last minute cramming and undue stress, it's necessary to build (and maintain!) a proper study habit. Just like with exercise, the task will become easier and more manageable the more you are able to get into a routine. And you'll be far less likely to lapse back into bad study habits once you've made studying an intractable part of your daily life.

#1: Stick to a Set Schedule

Your brain builds pathways and habits over time, and studying is about building those mental muscles and endurance. Getting into a fixed habit of studying will help you improve your concentration and mental stamina over time. And, just like any other training, your ability to study only improves with time and dedicated effort.

There are many activities that are good for us, but that we often—for whatever reason—dread doing. Whether this is exercising, doing chores, or studying, it's a good idea to set yourself a schedule and stick to it no matter how you're feeling at the moment. It's easy to put off these activities for a thousand reasons: you're busy doing something else, you're tired, you have a headache, you're not in the mood.…But the more you hold yourself to a set schedule, the more likely you'll do what you need to do without having to make an endless litany of excuses.

Aside from doing homework, set aside a dedicated 50 to 75 minutes to study each day and then stick to your schedule . You'll find the study rhythm that works best for you, but do know that you don't necessarily have to sit down and eek out those minutes all at once. You can decide to split the time into smaller segments throughout the day, or, if you work better at completing tasks and moving on, you can choose to get your studying done all at once.

One way to divide your after school study time into segments could be:

4:30 - 5:00 - arrive home, eat a snack, relax

5:00 - 5:30 - first study chunk

5:30 - 6:30 - break/homework/other task

6:30 - 6:45 - second study chunk

6:45 - 7:30 - dinner/assignments/other task

7:30 - 8:00 - final study chunk

Or, if you'd rather spend your 50-75 study minutes all at once, then your schedule may look more like:

5:00 - 6:15 - study time

6:15 - rest of evening - dinner, break, homework, other tasks

How you create your study schedule is up to you, just so long as you stick to it once you've made it and don't deviate.

#2: Schedule Your Studying in Smaller Increments Over a Long Period of Time

By committing 50 to 75 minutes to study every day (and sticking to your schedule!), you'll avoid both burning out your mental energy and being stuck cramming for hours and hours at a time the night before a test.

Not to say that cramming your material can't occasionally "work." Some people are absolutely able to cram for a test the night before and do well, but studying in this way will only store the information in your short-term memory, not your long-term. This means that, by cramming, you can struggle to stay apprised of the material as the semester progresses (especially in classes where previous information builds on later information, such as in science, math, or history classes).

And the long term effect of forcing your brain to cram necessary information at once will not only make studying for finals particularly difficult—essentially forcing you to re- learn a semester's worth of material, rather than being able to simply review it—but making a habit of cramming material at the last minute will only increase your stress and make you feel as though you have to constantly play "catch-up."

By sticking to a schedule of studying for a reasonable amount of time over the entire semester or term, you'll be able to better store and recall the information you need, and thereby reduce some of the stress that comes from schoolwork, tests, and studying.

good study habits in students

Setting the Right Study Environment

A proper study schedule is essential, but so is creating the right study environment. Your environment can have a tremendous impact on your concentration and productivity, so figuring out a proper study space will ultimately benefit you and improve your study time.

#3: Stick to the Same Study Spaces

A stable environment for a particular activity can help put you in the right mood and mind frame to complete the task at hand. The same applies for engaging in studying.

It is helpful to have one or two dedicated locations for schoolwork— separate from any "free time" areas—that you use to study in each and every study session. Sometimes this may not be possible if you live in a small dwelling and don't have access to free public spaces like a library, but do the best you can to find a space you can use solely for studying and stick by it.

Your study space will be individual to you, so don't worry about how other people work best. Some people concentrate their best when surrounded by others, like in a study group or a bustling coffee shop, while some people can only study if they're alone or in a completely silent location. Experiment with different environments and spaces until you find the one you seem to work in best and then stick to it as your dedicated "study zone."

#4: Practice Good Study Hygiene

Good study hygiene is about retaining a clear separation between work and rest. This allows you to focus on necessary tasks while minimizing stress and anxiety in the rest of your life.

We've already talked about keeping a dedicated study space, but now we have to be sure to keep those areas as "hygienic" as possible. How? By following a few key rules of setting up your study environment:

Make Sure That You DON'T Study In or On Your Bed

Studying in sleeping areas is the very definition of NOT maintaining a clear separation between work and rest, and most often leads to increased levels of stress and insomnia. This, in turn, can decrease your concentration and ability to study in the long term.

By blurring the lines between study-time and free-time, you'll only create spillover stress for yourself and be stuck in a cyclical effect of non-productivity and anxiety. So keep your study location to a desk, a table, or even a couch, so long as you aren't anywhere on your bed.

Keep Tantalizing Distractions Far Away

It's easy to allow ourselves to take "a quick break" to check our phones, get up and go hunting for a snack, or to let ourselves get caught up searching for irrelevant information on Wikipedia. There are untold distractions all around us that try to lure our concentration away from the task at hand, and giving into temptation can be an awful time suck. The best way to avoid distractions like these is to remove temptation altogether.

Make up a snack for yourself before you start studying so that you're not tempted to get up. Keep your phone far away, and turn off your wifi on your computer if you can. Tell yourself that you can't get up to check on whatever has you distracted until your allotted study time is up. Whatever has you distracted can wait until your study time is over.

Keep Yourself Comfortable, Hydrated, and Fed

Taking care of your body's basic needs will not only help to improve your mood and concentration while you study, but it will also help make sure you avoid needing to get up (and thereby lose your focus) during your study time.

So make sure you take water, a jacket, a snack, coffee, or whatever else you need to your study space so that you can be comfortable, focused, and ready to learn.

Varying Your Study Methods

There are many different ways to study, and none is exclusively better than any other. In fact, diversifying your study techniques, and using a mix of multiple different study methods will help you learn and store your information better than simply sticking to one.

Practicing different study methods and combining different techniques to prevent mental fatigue and keep your brain engaged. And we'll walk through some of the best study techniques here.

#5: Rewrite or Rephrase the Material in Your Own Words

It can be easy to get lost in a textbook and look back over a page, only to realize you don't remember what you just read. But luckily, that can be remedied.

For classes that require you to read large bodies of text, such as history, English, or psychology, make sure to stop periodically as you read. Pause at the end of a paragraph or a section and—without looking!—think about what the text just stated. Re-summarize it in your own words. Now glance back over the material to make sure you summarized the information accurately and remembered the relevant details. Make a mental note of whatever you missed and then move on to the next section.

You may also want to make a bulleted list of the pertinent information instead of just rephrasing it mentally or aloud. Without looking back down at the textbook, jot down the essentials of the material you just read. Then look over the book to make sure you haven't left out any necessary information.

Whether you choose to simply summarize aloud or whether you write your information down, re-wording the text is an invaluable study tool. By rephrasing the text in your own words, you can be sure you're actually remembering the information and absorbing its meaning, rather than just rote copying the info without truly understanding or retaining it.

#6: Teach the Material to Someone Else

Teaching someone else is a great way to distill your thoughts and summarize the information you've been studying. And, almost always, teaching someone else shows you that you've learned more about the material than you think!

Find a study-buddy, or a patient friend or relative, or even just a figurine or stuffed animal and explain the material to them as if they're hearing about it for the first time. Whether the person you're teaching is real or not, the act of teaching material aloud to another human being requires you to re-frame the information in new ways and think more carefully about how all the elements fit together.

And the act of running through your material this way—especially if you do it aloud—helps you more easily lock it in your mind.

#7: Quiz Yourself With Flashcards

Making flashcards is an oft-used study tool and for very good reason! Making your own flash cards can not only help you retain information just through the sheer act of writing it down, but will also help you connect pertinent pieces of information together. So for any subjects in which you must remember the connections between terms and information, such as formulas, vocabulary, equations, or historical dates, flashcards are the way to go.

To make the best use of your flashcards, use the Leitner Method, so that you don't waste your time studying what you already know.

To employ this method, quiz yourself with your flashcards and separate the cards into two different piles. In Pile 1, place the cards you knew and answered correctly, in Pile 2, place the cards you didn't know the answers to.

Now go back through the cards again, but only studying the cards from Pile 2 (the "didn't know" pile). Separate these again as you go through them into Pile 1 (know) and Pile 2 (don't know). Repeat the process of only studying to "don't know" cards until more and more cards can be added to the "know" pile.

Once all the cards are in the "know" pile, go through the whole pile once again to make sure you've retained the information on all the cards.

#8: Make Your Own Diagrams, Formula Sheets, and Charts

Reconstituting information into pictures can help you see and understand the material in new and different ways. For math and science classes, you may want to make yourself a formula sheet in addition to making flashcards. Flashcards will help you to remember each formula in isolation, but making one catch-all formula sheet will give you a handy study reference tool. And making one will, again, help you to retain your information just through the process of writing it down. The bonus is that if you're more of a visual/picture learner, a formula sheet can help you to remember your formulas by recalling how they're situated with one another.

To help you to remember your science processes, create your own diagrams. For instance, for a biology class, draw your own cell and label the components or make your own Krebs cycle diagram. These pictures will typically be in your textbooks, so examine the picture you're given and then create your own diagram without looking at the textbook. See how much you've been able to accurately recreate and then do it again until it's perfect.

Sometimes making your own charts and diagrams will mean recreating the ones in your textbook from memory, and sometimes it will mean putting different pieces of information together yourself. Whatever the diagram type and whatever the class, writing your information down and making pictures out of it will help to lock the material in your mind.

#9: Give Yourself Rewards

To make studying a little more fun, give yourself a small reward whenever you hit a study milestone. For instance, let yourself eat a piece of candy for every 25 flash cards you test yourself on or for every three paragraphs you read (and re-word) in your textbook. Or perhaps give yourself one extra minute of video game or television-watching time for every page you study from your book (to be redeemed only after your study time is over, of course).

Whatever your particular incentive is, let yourself have that small reward-boost to help see you through the days when studying seems particularly taxing.

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You can even make yourself a Study Reward Diagram: studying input -> candy reward -> energy boost -> more studying -> more candy!

Making the Most of Your Study Time

Whether you're studying for a particular test or studying to keep yourself apprised of the class material all throughout the term, you'll want to make the most of your allotted daily study time . After all, there's no use setting aside and committing to your 50-75 minutes a day to study if the time is ultimately unproductive.

So make the best of each study session by following these study tips for concentration and memory retention.

#10: Study New Material Within 24 Hours

In order to maintain your knowledge of the class material throughout the term, make life easier on yourself by reviewing any new information you learn on the same day you learned it. Reviewing new material within 24 hours will help you to retain much more of what you learned than if you were to review the same information at a later date.

So make sure to dedicate a portion of each study time to reviewing the information you learned that same day in your classes.

School bombards you with new material each and every day. And even if you're interested in the new material as you're learning it, it's all too easy to let anything new slip away when you have so much else to think about. But once the information has been pushed to the back burner of your mind, your brain will generally discard it rather than storing it into your long term memory.

To combat this "curve of forgetting," make a habit of taking notes in class and then reviewing the material that very same night. This will help lock the information into your long-term memory and serve you well in the future. Just a few minutes in the here and now will save you hours of having to relearn the material at a later date.

#11: Use the Pomodoro Technique to Retain Focus

Everyone loses their concentration from time to time. But, luckily for us, there are time management techniques that can help keep up mental energy and productivity, such as the Pomodoro Technique. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method for increased focus and concentration, which makes it ideal for tackling studying and homework.

The principle behind the technique is to divvy up your focus and break times into set regimes so that your mind remains sharp and attuned to the task at hand , without giving into fatigue or distraction.

The method is to divide your focus time ("pomodoros") into 25 minute blocks dedicated to a task. And every time you feel your focus drifting, write down what had you distracted, put it aside, and don't give into the temptation to lose focus. (For instance, if you feel compelled to look at your email or look up what year your favorite movie came out, mark down "check email" or "look up favorite movie" and then return to your original task.) This will allow you to acknowledge the distraction and return to it later without having it derail your study time now.

After every 25 minute block of time is complete, give yourself a check mark and allow yourself a 5 minute break. (A good time to check that email!) Once you've reached the fourth check mark (100 minutes of focus and 15 minutes of break), take a 20 minute break . Then begin the cycle again.

By balancing up your time and energy between designated periods of focus and rest, you'll be able to tackle studying your topic at hand without mental fatigue and burnout (which can easily occur if you try to marathon your way through a study session) and without losing focus (which can happen if you find yourself taking a break that lasts...indefinitely).

To help visualize this technique in action, let's look at it set out in an example schedule:

5:00 - 5:25 - first pomodoro

5:25 - 5:30 - short break

5:30 - 5:55 - second pomodoro

5:55 - 6:00 - short break

6:00 - 6:25 - third pomodoro

6:25 - 6:30 - short break

6:30 - 6:55 - fourth pomodoro

6:55 - 7:15 - long break

#12: Know When to Move On

There will always come a point in your studies where you need to simply put down the book and move on. As always, life is about balance, and eventually you'll start to see diminishing returns on your study efforts if you try to spend too much time on one particular topic/class/chapter.

At some point, your time will be better spent studying for other classes, or engaging in an alternate type of study task. Don't stop your studying earlier than your scheduled time, but turn your focus to a different study topic or switch your attention from quizzing yourself with flashcards to making a diagram instead.

It's not always easy to see, but you'll get better and better at realizing when you've hit this stopping point (and not the point five minutes into studying when you're bored) and are no longer retaining focus or information. It may take time, but you'll get there.

good study habits in students

Your brain is capable of great things, but even it has its limits. And learning how to maximize your time and energy will keep you from pushing those limits.

Preparing for Test Day

When you're preparing for a test, the actual studying part is only half the battle. The other half comes from being well prepared to actually take the test and giving it your best possible effort.

And these techniques will help you get there.

#13: Get Enough Sleep

The absolute, number one, most important way you can prepare yourself for a test is to sleep the night before. Getting a good night's sleep before a test (and preferably every night) is absolutely paramount.

Sleep increases focus and concentration. The effects of not sleeping are much like being under the influence of alcohol. No matter how well you know the material, taking a test sleep deprived will do you no favors.

A regular sleep schedule is preferable and will do wonders for your overall health, happiness, concentration, and memory. But even if you can't sleep, just closing your eyes and relaxing will help. So if you find yourself grappling with insomnia, let yourself relax in the dark and in your bed instead of whittling away the hours some other way.

#14: Pack Your Gear the Night Before the Test

Whatever it is you need to have, make sure to pack it up the night before. This will help you relax and sleep and will insure you don't leave anything crucial behind in your morning rush out the door.

So pack your pencils, your calculator, and scratch paper. Even lay out your clothes for the next day. Prepare whatever you need to so that you can reduce your stress and help you rest the night before your exam.

#15: Eat Something

Just like with sleeping, making sure to eat something the morning of a test will help you concentrate and focus throughout the day. Anything is better than nothing, but try to eat something that will keep you full and provide you with some protein and carbohydrates.

Whole grains, fruit, and eggs are generally a good bet, but pretty much anything will do in a pinch so long as you get some calories in you (and so long as it isn't pure sugar and caffeine!).

#16: Take a Walk

Exercising, even just a little bit, will help boost your mood, energy, and concentration. If possible, take a walk or do some quick cardio exercises (such as jumping jacks) for ten to twenty minutes before an exam.

Now you're ready to rock that test—go get it!

good study habits in students

...And then take a nap when you're done.

The Take-Aways: How to Study Better

Being able to study and study well is a skill and a habit that's built like any other. It takes preparation, time, and diligence to see it through, but once the habit is established, it will simply become a part of your daily routine.

To maintain the proper balance of leisure and work (and, most importantly, avoid burnout and excessive stress), it's best to stick to schedules and divvy up your time and energy over long periods of time. And remember to use that allotted time wisely once you're in the middle of it.

Of course an ideal schedule isn't always realistic and there will still be those days you have to cram for whatever reason. But incorporating healthier time management and study methods will benefit you in the long-term and serve you well not only in high school, but in college, in the workplace, and for whatever other task you set your mind to in the future.

good study habits in students

Just take it one step at a time and you'll be amazed at the final results.

What's Next?

Now that you've tackled how to study better, make sure you actually get that studying done by learning how to overcome procrastination .

Unsure about how your GPA ranks with your top school choices? Learn what GPA you need to get into the school you want and how much your GPA matters for college applications.

Studying for the SAT or ACT? Check out some of our expert guides, starting with how to get a perfect score .

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Courtney scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT in high school and went on to graduate from Stanford University with a degree in Cultural and Social Anthropology. She is passionate about bringing education and the tools to succeed to students from all backgrounds and walks of life, as she believes open education is one of the great societal equalizers. She has years of tutoring experience and writes creative works in her free time.

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Study habits for success: tips for students

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Director - Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland

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Right now, thousands of Australian school children and university students are taking a well-earned break from the classroom. Long breaks like this help us clear our minds, but they can also provide an opportunity to prepare for the learning year ahead.

If you’re a student, this might mean thinking about your study habits. Here are some suggestions to help you learn as efficiently as possible.

Focus! And don’t multi-task

Our brains are impressive machines, but they can’t handle everything at once. There is simply too much going on in our sensory environment for us to digest. To be effective, we need to direct our attention to just one or two tasks at a time. That generally means no background music – it won’t help you learn .

good study habits in students

Don’t be tempted to multi-task while you learn. When you do, your brain is actually trying its hardest to switch rapidly between tasks. But whenever you get distracted and switch focus, it takes minutes to settle back into the groove of studying. Minimise your distractions and focus your attention on the task at hand.

Sleep well, learn well

Learning isn’t easy, and being able to focus is important for digesting new information and understanding concepts. When you get a good night’s sleep , you feel fresh and attentive the next day.

Read more: Why our brain needs sleep, and what happens if we don’t get enough of it

Sleep is also critical for what happened the previous day. Extensive work in both animals and humans shows a crucial function of sleep is to re-process and consolidate what happened during the day.

For example, scientists have recorded brain activity patterns first while an animal learns a task, and again when the animal next sleeps . Remarkably, the patterns in sleep are strikingly similar to what is seen when the animal learns.

This replay of activity patterns during sleep happens in your brain too, hundreds of times each night. As a result, the connections between our neurons change, helping the patterns become embedded in the brain. In other words, sleep plays an indispensable role in storing our memories for the long-term.

Test yourself

The “testing effect” is a well-established phenomenon in learning. Essentially, we learn much better by testing our own knowledge than by re-studying material. So if you’ve got an exam coming up, don’t just re-read a textbook and highlight important passages.

Read more: What's the best, most effective way to take notes?

Instead, test yourself by doing practice exams. The process of actively recalling information helps deeper learning take place, and it works even better if you can check whether your answer is correct.

You don’t have to wait until exam time to capitalise on the testing effect. As you read through a textbook you can give yourself mini-tests, trying to recall the major points of each chapter you finish.

Although researchers are still trying to figure out the brain mechanisms behind the effect, there is plenty of evidence for its effectiveness. When combined with spacing (below), practising recall is an efficient way to commit information to your long-term memory.

Space out (your learning)

Teachers and parents are always telling us cramming is the wrong way to learn, and for good reason. It just isn’t as effective as spacing your learning over days, weeks and months. This is known as the “spacing effect”.

Whenever you practise something, you give your brain the opportunity to strengthen the connections between neurons. The strengthening process is similar to how hikers trampling through a forest create worn paths over time. The more hikers, the more distinct the path, just like repeated practice helps lay down strong neural pathways to store memories.

good study habits in students

Although the best spacing strategy isn’t known, we do know an expanding schedule is better than a contracting schedule. In other words, it’s better to review your course material after a day, then a week, then a month, rather than the other way around.

Use memory aids

If you learned music as a child, you probably remember one of the mnemonics for notes on a scale – for example “Every Good Boy Deserves Fruit” (E-G-B-D-F). Mnemonics like this make difficult things easier to remember. You can make up your own mnemonics for classroom concepts.

For example, maybe you need to memorise the noble gases in the periodic table (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn). Just make a crazy sentence out of it and you’ll find it much easier (for example, “he never argues, Krusty, xenophobic runt.” This one might only make sense if you watched The Simpsons).

Another approach, and one frequently used by people in the World Memory Championships , is the memory palace technique (also called the “method of loci”).

Your “memory palace” is a place you know well, like your house, or the route you take to the bus stop. You fill this palace with the things you need to remember, and then you re-create a path that takes you past all of those items.

This technique relies partly on the fact that our hippocampus – the part of the brain where many memories are formed – is also crucial for navigation. Both anecdotal and scientific evidence show anybody can improve their memory using this approach.

Read more: Mapping the brain: scientists define 180 distinct regions, but what now?

Finally, analogies and metaphors can be great tools for learning. For example, I hope that by comparing memory formation to hikers on a forest path, you’ll be more likely to remember a bit about how our brains lay down strong memories.

You can create similar analogies in your own study, and if you combine it with good sleep, spaced practice, self-testing and undivided attention, you can take your learning to another level.

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Education Corner

10 Study Habits of Highly Effective Students

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The key to becoming an effective student is learning how to study smarter, not harder. This becomes more and more true as you advance in your education. An hour or two of studying a day is usually sufficient to make it through high school with satisfactory grades, but when college arrives, there aren’t enough hours in the day to get all your studying in if you don’t know how to study smarter.

While some students are able to breeze through school with minimal effort, this is the exception. The vast majority of successful students achieve their success by developing and applying effective study habits.

The following are the top 10 study habits employed by highly successful students. So if you want to become a successful student, don’t get discouraged, don’t give up. Work to develop each of the study habits below and you’ll see your grades go up, your knowledge increase, and your ability to learn and assimilate information improve.

1. Don’t attempt to cram all your studying into one session.

Ever find yourself up late at night expending more energy trying to keep your eyelids open than you are studying? If so, it’s time for a change. Successful students typically space their work out over shorter periods of time and rarely try to cram all of their studying into just one or two sessions.

If you want to become a successful student then you need to learn to be consistent in your studies and to have regular, yet shorter, study periods.

2. Plan when you’re going to study.

Successful students schedule specific times throughout the week when they are going to study — and then they stick with their schedule. Students who study sporadically and whimsically typically do not perform as well as students who have a set study schedule.

Even if you’re all caught up with your studies, creating a weekly routine, where you set aside a period of time a few days a week, to review your courses will ensure you develop habits that will enable you to succeed in your education long term.

3. Study at the same time.

Not only is it important that you plan when you’re going to study, it’s important you create a consistent, daily study routine. When you study at the same time each day and each week, you’re studying will become a regular part of your life. You’ll be mentally and emotionally more prepared for each study session and each study session will become more productive.

If you have to change your schedule from time to time due to unexpected events, that’s okay, but get back on your routine as soon as the event has passed.

4. Each study time should have a specific goal.

Simply studying without direction is not effective. You need to know exactly what you need to accomplish during each study session. Before you start studying, set a study session goal that supports your overall academic goal (i.e. memorize 30 vocabulary words in order to ace the vocabulary section on an upcoming Spanish test.)

5. Never procrastinate your planned study session.

It’s very easy, and common, to put off your study session because of lack of interest in the subject, because you have other things you need to get done, or just because the assignment is hard. Successful students DO NOT procrastinate studying.

If you procrastinate your study session, your studying will become much less effective and you may not get everything accomplished that you need to. Procrastination also leads to rushing, and rushing is the number one cause of errors.

6. Start with the most difficult subject first.

As your most difficult assignment or subject will require the most effort and mental energy, you should start with it first. Once you’ve completed the most difficult work, it will be much easier to complete the rest of your work.

Believe it or not, starting with the most difficult subject will greatly improve the effectiveness of your study sessions, and your academic performance.

7. Always review your notes before starting an assignment.

Obviously, before you can review your notes you must first have notes to review. Always make sure to take good notes in class. Before you start each study session, and before you start a particular assignment, review your notes thoroughly to make sure you know how to complete the assignment correctly.

Reviewing your notes before each study session will help you remember important subject matter learned during the day, and make sure your studying is targeted and effective.

8. Make sure you’re not distracted while you’re studying.

Everyone gets distracted by something. Maybe it’s the TV. Or maybe it’s your family. Or maybe it’s just too quiet. Some people actually study better with a little background noise. When you’re distracted while studying you (1) lose your train of thought and (2) are unable to focus – both of which will lead to very ineffective studying.

Before you start studying, find a place where you won’t be disturbed or distracted. For some people this is a quiet cubicle in the recesses of the library. For others it is in a common area where there is a little background noise.

9. Use study groups effectively.

Ever heard the phrase “two heads are better than one?” Well this can be especially true when it comes to studying. Working in groups enables you to (1) get help from others when you’re struggling to understand a concept, (2) complete assignments more quickly, and (3) teach others, whereby helping both the other students and yourself to internalize the subject matter. However, study groups can become very ineffective if they’re not structured and if group members come unprepared. Effective students use study groups effectively.

10. Review your notes, schoolwork and other class materials over the weekend.

Successful students review what they’ve learned during the week over the weekend. This way they’re well prepared to continue learning new concepts that build upon previous coursework and knowledge acquired the previous week.

We’re confident that if you’ll develop the habits outlined above that you’ll see a major improvement in your academic success.

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Temma Ehrenfeld

14 Great Study Habits for a Lifetime

These tips can help at all ages, from high-school students to job-changers..

Posted May 10, 2023 | Reviewed by Davia Sills

  • Discipline and focus are skills that can develop over time with incremental practice.
  • Avoid multitasking whenever possible. People tend to think they're better at multitasking than they are.
  • Getting creative with memory devices can enhance recall and productivity.

Photo by Windows on Unsplash

Whether you’re a retiree learning for fun, adapting to meet challenges at a job, or boning up as part of a career switch, study habits can come in handy.

Here are 14 ways to improve how you learn. They may be especially helpful if you have ADHD or a low mood that limits your energy.

1. Take a little time to get into the right frame of mind.

Take a little time, not so much that you’ve used up all of your available time. For example, dance to an upbeat song for 10 minutes. If you’re distracted by chores that need doing, list them, then put the list away for later. If you’re completely obsessed with a distraction, be honest with yourself. But don’t just procrastinate . Decide exactly when you’ll do your studying and commit to being in the right frame of mind.

Be positive. Instead of thinking, “I don’t have enough time,” think, “I’m starting now.” Remember that discipline and focus are skills that you can build over time in small steps.

2. Find a quiet spot without distractions and return to it next time.

Think, “Where did I do well?” Look for the ideal situation, not just “good enough.” It might be as simple as choosing to sit up on a living room chair rather than lie down on the sofa to read. The bed probably isn’t the best place.

3. Bring what you need, but only what you need.

If you need a book, don’t forget it. But if you can leave your smartphone well out of reach, do so. Do you truly learn best while listening to music? If so, have your music and earphones, but otherwise, don’t have them handy.

4. Don’t multitask.

You may think you’re an expert at watching a video with the information you need and scrolling through Instagram . However, evidence suggests that common sense applies: You have only so much working memory , and you’re taking some of it up on Instagram. Your multitasking means you won’t absorb and retain as much of the video.

5. Outline your notes. Make lists and fill them in.

Make outlines that work for you, even if they might be confusing to someone else. Use words that make sense to you, translating the words in material you may be reading. “Chunk” together the groups of words or facts or ideas that you feel belong in a group. The goal is to produce an outline that will help you—not someone else—remember the material.

Writing may work better than keyboarding into a laptop. There’s some evidence that that helps us think. Read aloud an important sentence if you’re alone or mouth the words if you’re in a library. You may think it’s babyish to mouth or read aloud. Actually, poetry was the first way that human beings remembered stories, and we haven’t changed that much.

6. If you like memory devices, use them and get creative.

Make up a catchy rhyme to associate ideas and repeat it out loud. Make up a sentence. For example, “Never Ever Seem Worried,” is a way to remember “North, East, South, West.” “Every Good Boy Deserves Fun” helps music students remember the five notes of the treble clef, “E, G, B, D, F.”

If you don’t know if you like memory devices, try one out and see if it sticks. Then the next time you’re studying, you can try another one.

If you tend to be visual, take your time looking at the illustrations or photos in the book you’re reading to associate them with the information.

7. Practice.

If you’re taking a class and will be writing the answer to a surprise question on a test, make up a likely question and do the exercise of writing an answer with a timer on. Do it again.

Actually try to solve the sample problems in the materials you’re using; don’t just read the answers. Make up similar problems, try to solve them, and later on, at the end of a study period, find sources that can tell you whether your answers were correct. If you’re learning a new language, you might write out some questions and answers and show them to a native speaker at your next opportunity. Research suggests that an activity in which you generate a product or test yourself is more powerful than time spent consuming information—for example, reviewing notes.

good study habits in students

8. Find buddies.

Some people like to work with a group of four or five other people who are at about their level. Quiz each other. Try to do as well as the person you most admire. Turn envy into a source of motivation rather than resentment.

9. Make a schedule you can stick to.

If you have any flexibility, notice the times of day when you’re sharpest and dedicate them to learning. If you’re studying at home on a weekend or work at home, take a warm morning shower to gear up for analytical work, advises biologist and body-clock expert Steve Kay. Get your studying or work done before lunch, especially if you’re an early riser. You’re likely to be most distractible from noon to 4 p.m.

Sticking to a schedule may seem like a burden, but you’ll appreciate the investment if you can avoid last-minute cramming. How many minutes you spend each time is less important than regularity.

9. Space it out.

Most work goes better if you divide it into realistic chunks. Try not to cram for an exam in one burst. The evidence against cramming is mixed, but the common-sense advice to plan ahead and proceed in a consistent way, spacing out your study time, does seem to be right.

10. Take breaks.

If you’re falling asleep while reading, you may have picked the wrong time of day to study. Consider a nap if you’re sleep-deprived and then get back to work.

If you’re losing focus, but not short of sleep, move. It’ll help you more than extra coffee and stoking yourself with sugar is a mistake. Stretch and walk to the other end of the library at least once an hour. Even better, go for a short jog.

Bouts of movement—typically 15 to 20 minutes at moderate intensity—can measurably boost your mood and cognitive performance. Even 10 minutes can make a difference. Take time to look out the window, especially if you have a view of trees or other greenery. Nature is a good stress -reliever , even if you can’t climb the Himalayas today. If you succeed at a significant goal—maybe reading an entire chapter—treat yourself by a break flying over the Himalayas on Google’s satellite map.

10. Reward yourself.

It’s healthy to set goals and then reward yourself in ways you decide in advance—not French fries, but something you won’t regret later. Facebook is an OK break if you haven’t let it become a substitute for what you meant to do.

11. Students need to learn about finding balance.

This means getting enough sleep, eating regularly and well, exercising, and not becoming too distracted or obsessed by personal problems. As adults, we, too, need to keep that kind of balance.

12. Don’t depend on drugs to make you more focused and productive.

Also don’t indulge in partying in ways that will interfere with the next day.

13. If you’re taking a course, talk to the instructor early on, or an assistant, to know what to expect.

You may be aiming high, so plan on working harder or be realistic about your grade. Suss out what’s most important to the instructor. Establish a connection so you can talk to the instructor if you find yourself falling behind or do badly on a project. Pay attention in class.

14. Recall your original goals and motivations.

Sometimes we lose track of our original impetus once we're midway through an endeavor. Why did you want to master this material? If you're resenting the time, money, or difficulty, talk to someone you trust to reorient yourself.

Temma Ehrenfeld

Temma Ehrenfeld is a New York-based science writer, and former assistant editor at Newsweek .

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How to build strong study habits

Here's your chance to become a master of studying! Benefit from our complete guide to building strong study habits that will last a lifetime.

How to build strong study habits

If your habits don't line up with your dream, then you need to either change your habits or change your dream ― John C. Maxwell

Like college students in the midst of their first bad hangover, we swear we’ll never, ever wait to cram at the last moment again. It's the perennial complaint of students everywhere: “...if only I’d started studying sooner, then I wouldn’t be in this mess!”

Well, I have good news for you. Studying effectively doesn't have to be hard!

The secret is building strong study habits .

Habits are grooves carved into your brain’s neural network that eventually become hard-wired, like tracks for a train to run on. Once studying becomes a habit, instead of your brain trudging along muddy hillocky paths, pushing aside thorny bushes and stepping in cowpats, you glide along smooth rails, getting your study done easily so you can go out and play.

In fact, studies have shown that once an action becomes habitual it takes far less effort for your brain to accomplish it. (Which would FINALLY help you keep your New Year's resolutions! )

A train in the country side

Sounds great, right?

Well, it is great. Once you’ve made studying daily a rock-solid habit, you’ll reap the rewards. Daily practice plays to your memory’s strengths, so you’ll be able to get knowledge solidly into your brain with less effort.

However, there are a series of enemies blocking your path: (1) social expectations, aka FOMO ; (2) the desire to save brainpower ; (3) procrastination ; and (4) instant gratification .

If you want to become a study master and cruise smoothly through each study session, you will need to disarm these enemies and use their weapons against them.

We've given you 11 tips on how to do that:

  • Anchor new habits to old ones
  • Start one micro-habit at a time
  • Keep the chain going
  • Bribe yourself to study
  • Discover your best time to study
  • Use peer pressure to study better
  • Combat the forces of FOMO
  • Be unapologetic about studying
  • Give yourself consequences
  • Sort out your study environment
  • The hidden benefits of daily study habits

Are you ready to enter the dojo and build strong daily study habits? Then welcome, young padawan. It’s time to learn the ways of the study master.

Psst. Improve your mental and physical well-being with these small life-changing habits that take ZERO time ! Also, did you know you can use the Brainscape app to achieve your personal growth goals —like improving your health, wealth, mindset, emotional intelligence, etc.?

Two warriors

1. The enemies of good study habits

The secret to improving study motivation and building good study habits is to realize it’s a game of two halves—you must play both offense and defense. This means you need to both defend against distractions and set your mind to do the work.

Think of your brain as a sort of council. There is more than one politician in Congress, and not all of them have your long-term interests at heart. Sometimes the long-term planner (the frontal cortex) wins the vote, and you go and do things that are hard but will give you rewards later.

Many other times, however, the more ancient, less evolved parts of your brain win the day. This is when the lizard brain or limbic system takes over. These areas respond well to crises—but when there’s no emergency, they seek pleasure.

This is the part that’s in control when, instead of studying, you do whatever is easy and gives you a reward straight away. Think watching Netflix, playing beer pong, napping, surfing the net, shopping, or eating ice-cream.

The issue is that for most people, their frontal cortex has a minority government; It doesn’t have all that much pull. And both inside and outside the brain, the forces arrayed against it are multitudinous.

Girl that is bouldering

So now, you’re about to learn which obstacles are in the way of building your study habits and how to defeat them . Let’s get started ...

1.1. Social expectations, aka FOMO

This one is huge, especially if you’re engaged in campus life. The pull to skip studying and do fun things with your friends can be really strong.

Continually resisting temptation puts a heavy load on your willpower.

Many of the best-laid study plans are derailed by some random invitation that spirals into a whole day of distraction. Socializing is important. But there’s a way to prioritize your study so it gets done, and you can still have guilt-free outings with your friends.

1.2. The desire to save brainpower

The brain is an energy hungry organ . It’s only 2% of your body weight, but even when you’re resting, it demands 20% of your energy.

Thinking, studying, learning—all of these take up brain space. Normally, we prefer to conserve this energy, so it’s a natural thing for us to avoid tasks that are going to exhaust us mentally.

This is why you need systems to get you through the hardest part: actually sitting down to do study. Because this avoidance of spending brain energy leads to ...

1.3. Procrastination

A test that’s weeks or months away doesn’t feel urgent. As the test looms closer, however, it’s amazing how many people end up with spotlessly clean kitchens, perfectly ordered sock drawers, and crisply cut lawns.

This is a wonderful tactic to feel productive by getting everything else done… except for studying.

What’s at work here is a phenomenon called delay discounting . Researchers have found that humans prefer a small reward delivered in the near future over a larger reward they have to wait for. It’s a variation on avoiding delayed gratification.

The ancient parts of your brain HATE spending valuable brain energy on things that are not either a clear and present danger or a pleasurable escape. Back in the days when we were part of the food chain, humans needed their brains to stay focused on urgent problems, like staying alive.

Precious brain juice wasn’t spent on contemplating why apples fell off trees or other non-urgent problems. This urge to prioritize only urgent tasks is still very much alive in us all.

Our brains are very skilled at bringing up seemingly urgent tasks to do instead of hard mental work. Hence the emergence of the spotless fridge and ironed boxer shorts during study week.

1.4. Instant gratification

As mentioned before the ancient, emotion-driven limbic system in our brains craves instant rewards.

In the 1960s, a Stanford professor named Walter Mischel conducted a series of experiments designed to test four-year-old children to their furthest limits.

Mischel put a marshmallow on a table in front of a kid and said they could eat the marshmallow now. Or they could eat two marshmallows if they didn’t eat the marshmallow while he left the room.

Mischel then left the room, leaving a marshmallow sitting in front of a deeply conflicted four-year-old.

This now-famous test became known as the Marshmallow Experiment . While tormenting children for science was entertaining (some children had to scoot their chairs over to the corner, face the wall, and sit on their hands to avoid eating the marshmallow) what was most interesting was the aftermath.

For the next forty years, Mischel followed his participants’ lives. He and other researchers found that the kids who passed the Marshmallow Experiment and could delay gratification had higher SAT scores , better health , and happier relationships .

It turns out that the ability to delay gratification is a key part of living a good life . Those who will do something hard in order to experience rewards not now, but in the future, succeed in their endeavors.

The issue here is that you’re not a four-year-old child who has to wait five minutes for two marshmallows. (Although to be fair, when you’re four years old, five minutes is a lifetime.)

Navigating life when you’re a student or working means constant pressure from conflicting obligations. You’ll have to make myriad decisions throughout each day. You’ll be resisting temptations, juggling priorities, and managing your energy.

Each time you put off something easy in order to do something hard, you’re using your willpower. It turns out that willpower is a limited resource and gets exhausted the more you use it.

That’s why if you try to do study daily on an ad hoc basis, it’s much more likely to not get done. Then you end up like everyone else: only studying when a test is looming closer, under the tyranny of an impending deadline.

Cramming is an ineffective way to study, which is why (as you’ll find out soon) distraction is an enemy you will need to vanquish to build strong study habits.

2. Strong study habit tips to defeat your enemies

Knight lying down in defeat

As you may have figured out by now, the phrase "strong study habits" is basically synonymous with "developing the willpower to do a little bit of work every day because the alternative -- cramming -- is less effective and even more time-consuming in the long run."

The importance of this realization cannot be underestimated. You can even think of habit formation in terms of this popular mathematical equation:

Math equation that shows strong study habits pay off

In other words, doing just a little bit of extra effort every day (no exceptions!) for an entire year will exponentially increase your performance, while slacking off every day will erode your performance or knowledge toward nearly zero, such that you have to start again from scratch (e.g. "cramming") at the last minute.

The good news is that you can fundamentally hack your brain to develop these consistent daily study habits to the point that they become almost effortless.

Below is our list of various forms of mental jiu-jitsu that can help you turn study foes’ weapons against them.

[Try this hack: ' How the benefits of cold showers can change your life ']

Tip 1. Anchor new habits to old ones

Rope tied in a knot

As we mentioned above, our brains don’t like to expend lots of energy on hard mental work. But when something becomes a habit, it doesn’t take energy or willpower; you do the thing on autopilot.

The easiest way to make a new habit is to tie it into an existing habit that is already established (otherwise known as an anchor habit.)

For example, if you study better in the morning, then bring out your notes and do your study session while you have your first coffee of the day. The first coffee is your anchor habit, and study is the new habit you’re attaching to it. Quite quickly, you’ll see that studying also becomes automatic.

If evenings are your chosen study time, then build your habit on something you do every evening. For example, you could spend an hour studying every night after dinner, or you could work through your notes before you go to bed each night. Or you could use the Feynman Technique while you’re out walking, exercising, or commuting.

When you tie your new habit with an existing habit, you’re taking advantage of neural pathways that have been already laid down. With consistent practice, your new study habit should start to feel effortless in a couple of weeks.

Tip 2. Start one micro-habit at a time

Workers building a wall

One of the best ways to guarantee that your new habit won't stick is to take on too big of a challenge at once. So let's nip that one in the bud before we continue.

If your goal is to study every day instead of waiting until the last minute, don't start by promising yourself that you'll study for two hours a day or re-read 5 textbook chapters at a time. That can feel so daunting that you'll end up quitting the first time a major wave of inertia hits you.

Instead, maybe just commit to studying one 10-flashcard round in Brainscape every day, or to making digital flashcards for just one small textbook lesson every day. As long as you have broken up your studying into bite-sized milestones, it will be much easier to develop these habits and stay motivated to study .

Admittedly, tiny daily study sessions might not initially be enough to totally prevent your needing to cram more at the last minute. But at least you're establishing real habits, and you can always add to your goals once your small starter goals have begun to stick.

Tip 3. Keep the chain going

Strong chain to develop strong study habits

Another hack for building strong study habits comes from comedian Jerry Seinfeld. For years, Seinfeld would write a joke every day, no matter what was going on in his life. After many days, this chain of daily practice became its own incentive.

The threat of breaking the chain contributed to his motivation: Seinfeld didn’t want to break the chain, so he continued writing a joke every day. The habit stuck.

You can use apps like Don’t Break the Chain or Done to create a chain for your daily study habit OR you can very simply set study reminders in Brainscape! Go into the menu in the mobile app, select 'Notifications', and then toggle on 'Streak Reminders'. Those will show up as push notifications on your phone’s home screen, reminding you to stop what you’re doing and put in a quick study round with Brainscape. You can also customize the time of day you’d prefer to receive your reminders!

Tip 4. Bribe yourself to study

A handshake

You now know there are deep and powerful parts of your brain that crave instant gratification. They are not moved by distant lofty goals. They want something yummy now.

So, use this to your advantage. The idea is to train your brain like it’s one of Pavlov’s dogs.

In his foundational experiment, Pavlov was able to connect two stimuli in a dog’s brain : the ringing of a bell, and a bowl of delicious dog food.

By the end of Pavlov’s experiment, the connection between the sound of the bell and a meal was so strong, his dogs would start to salivate when they heard the bell.

You need to make a connection between sitting down to study, and something your brain really likes.

It’s time to train your brain with gratification.

Every time you sit down do study, give yourself a treat. Whatever floats your particular boat: whether it’s chocolate, gummy bears, or your favorite TV show. Naked and Afraid anyone? Once you've studied at least 10-15 minutes (of Brainscape flashcards :), give yourself the treat.

Pretty soon, your brain will start to look forward to your study sessions, because you’ll have connected the positive experience (the treat) with studying.

Congratulations! You have created a neural connection in your brain to tie studying together with gummy bears. Science has been achieved.

Tip 5. Discover your best time to study

Many black and white clocks

To build strong habits, it’s very important to study at the same time each day whenever possible. We’re cyclical creatures, and keeping your study schedule regular will cement the habit much more strongly than shifting it around each day.

So when should you study? Are you a morning lark or a night owl ?

Do you feel sharp at 11 am or 7 pm? Do you fade after lunch? Perk up after dinner? Maybe you’re one of those rare birds who wake up at 6 am bright-eyed, bushy-tailed, ready to go...

Everyone has a circadian cycle of sleep and wakefulness. Paying attention to this cycle means you can go to study at times when your energy is optimal. To discover your cycle, spend a week observing yourself ( or read this article ). Look for the times of day or night when you are at your best and able to tackle difficult mental tasks.

Take note of how the time you go to bed affects how you feel in the morning. This is important. Your circadian rhythm means you can get the same eight hours of sleep, but how rested you feel depends a lot on when during the night you took your rest.

Some people can go to bed at midnight and feel great the next day. Others need to go to bed before 10 pm to get a really good night’s sleep. Once you’ve worked out when you function best, note down those times. Use this knowledge to decide when is the best time for you to study .

Tip 6. Use peer pressure to study better

Peer pressure is a powerful force. It makes people do strange things, like wear clothes with brand logos on them or buy $30 drinks at bars.

A variant of this force is one of Professor Robert Cialdini’s six powerful elements of human persuasion . It’s called consistency, and you can use it to persuade yourself into good habits.

Here’s how consistency works. As human beings, we like to appear to be consistent to our fellow humans. So if we tell everyone “I’m a party animal, and the only time I ever study is on the night before a test,” a precedent has been set.

To appear consistent with your peers, you can’t be found going over your lecture notes on a mid-term Wednesday evening.

However, if you tell all your friends about the wonders of studying every day, then you have a different kind of reputation to uphold.

Most people will expend far more effort to avoid embarrassment than they will to achieve a distant goal. So use this knowledge to create social pressure in support of the habits that will make you succeed in life.

Embrace your inner nerd , and ‘own’ the fact that you geek out at a set time each day. Anyone who makes fun of you will find the tables turned during finals week, when they’re frantically trying to cram, and you’re relaxed and confident with plenty of time for leisure.

Spaced repetition vs cramming

After a few months of daily studying, you’ll find your habits become a part of your identity. Once you see yourself as someone who studies every day, you’ve truly won the battle and created strong study habits.

Tip 7. Combat the forces of FOMO

Two broken phones

Always turn your phone and social media notifications OFF when you start your study time. Apps like Freedom and StayFocusd can do this for you on a laptop. Ignorance is the best cure for FOMO—if you don’t know about the other things you could be doing, you can’t be distracted by them.

Tip 8. Be unapologetic about studying

Another way to avoid social pressure is to be unapologetic about how you spend your time. Don’t give an explanation, and people won’t press you.

For example, if someone asks you to hang out during your study time, just say "Nope, I have to study." They don't have to know that your test isn't for another 6 weeks.

Tip 9. Give yourself consequences

Statue of a dog in the grass

Last, if you have someone who wants to join your daily study regime, use the power of aversion to cement your study habit.

This is because while rewards are good, bad consequences are an even more powerful way to create habits. Studies show people will go further to avoid pain than gain pleasure .

With your study partner, create awful consequences if you don’t follow through on your daily study. Keep each other accountable, and be ready to enforce the payout if they don’t keep up their side of the bargain. (And be ready to suffer the consequences if you don’t.)

Using a service like Stickk , people have been forced to donate money to their least favorite charity when they don’t complete their goals. Other sites will publish photos of the person naked if they don’t stick to their weight loss goals (whatever gets the job done, right?). You’d better believe that with stakes like that in the game, participants stick to their goals, and so will you.

Tip 10. Sort out your study environment

Organized workspace for the best study habits

The last key to creating a rock-solid study habit is controlling your environment. Set reminders for you to start your daily study session. Create a special area dedicated to study, with all the things you’ll need to do the work close at hand.

Put up a calendar so you can see how each day brings you closer to your exam. Use this same calendar to keep track of your chain of daily study sessions.

Make it "convenient" to study often. Keep your books and notes in a place where you can easily and frequently access them. Have your flashcard app on your phone's home screen and in your web browser's "Favorites" bar, so you don’t have to think about what to do first in your study session.

Building a strong study habit is very similar to getting fit. As your brain gets into the habit of working each day at a set time, it gets fitter, and study sessions become more enjoyable.

Tip 11. The hidden benefits of daily study habits

When you defy the enemies of study and build your strong study habit, you’re also doing something else. Something very important. You’re building character.

'Character' has been defined as the ability to complete a task long after the mood in which the decision to do it has left you.

When you keep your promises to yourself, you’re sending yourself an important message about who you are, and what you’re capable of. In doing this, you’re laying the foundation for future success and happiness.

3. Build your study system

good study habits in students

We’ve now gone through the two parts of building a strong study habit: defense and offense. It’s time to put it all together.

Here are the habits that go into building a study system that will work for you.

  • Choose an existing activity you habitually do at these times and tie it to your new study habit.
  • Keep the chain going—maintain a record of your daily sessions, and create an unbroken chain of them.
  • Decide on your study treat and bribe yourself with it at the start and end of your session.
  • Note the times of day when your brain is sharpest. Choose these as your designated study times.
  • Start celebrating your inner nerd. Spread the gospel of daily study to your friends to create a consistent character you have to live up to.
  • Push back against FOMO by turning off your phone and staying ignorant of what your friends are doing.
  • Be unapologetic when ducking out of social events in order to keep your study habit.
  • Choose your accountability partner, and decide on some (very unpleasant) consequences if you don’t follow through on your study plan.
  • Set up a special study space with everything you need.
  • Prep your study materials and Brainscape flashcards so the first few minutes of study can be done on autopilot
  • Study daily to build character

Building strong study habits is ultimately about respecting your long term goals. And if you need help breaking out of a fixed mindset and learning how to stick to the long road, roll with the punches, be a little more patient, and embrace the learning curve, definitely read: ' How to unlock a growth mindset '.

Remind yourself that studying is actually a way of honoring yourself and keeping your promises. Every time you keep your commitments, you’re building your willpower muscle, and this will help you throughout your entire life.

Ayduk, O., Mendoza-Denton, R., Mischel, W., Downey, G., Peake, P. K., & Rodriguez, M. (2000). Regulating the interpersonal self: Strategic self-regulation for coping with rejection sensitivity . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79 (5), 776–792. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.79.5.776

Cialdini, R. (2016). Pre-suasion: A revolutionary way to influence and persuade. Simon & Schuster.

Doyle, J. R. (2013). Survey of time preference, delay discounting models . Judgment and Decision Making , 8 (2), 116-135.

Gardner, B., & Rebar, A. L. (2019). Habit formation and behavior change . In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Psychology .

Gailliot, M. T., Baumeister, R. F., DeWall, C. N., Maner, J. K., Plant, E. A., Tice, D. M., Brewer, L. E., & Schmeichel, B. J. (2007). Self-control relies on glucose as a limited energy source: Willpower is more than a metaphor . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92 (2), 325–336. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.92.2.325

Jarius, S., & Wildemann, B. (2015). And Pavlov still rings a bell: Summarising the evidence for the use of a bell in Pavlov’s iconic experiments on classical conditioning. Journal of neurology , 262 (9), 2177-2178. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-015-7858-5

Mischel, W., Ayduk, O., Berman, M. G., Casey, B. J., Gotlib, I. H., Jonides, J., ... & Shoda, Y. (2011). ‘Willpower’ over the life span: Decomposing self-regulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience , 6 (2), 252-256.

Seeyave, D. M., Coleman, S., Appugliese, D., Corwyn, R. F., Bradley, R. H., Davidson, N. S., ... & Lumeng, J. C. (2009). Ability to delay gratification at age 4 years and risk of overweight at age 11 years. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine , 163 (4), 303-308.

Flashcards for serious learners .

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Supporting good study habits

Earning a perfect (or near perfect) GPA is an attainable goal for sure — your student just needs a plan. It can’t hurt to be proactive and talk with your student as the new semester begins. The next time you have some time with your student, ask them about school, “Ready for school?” or “How’s school going?” If they’re struggling, share some of the tips below and help them get started.

It also helps to be prepared when your student comes to you with questions or opens up about grades, stress or upcoming assignments. 

Here are our best student tips for earning a 4.00.

Keep assignments organized 

A monthly or daily calendar, whether digital or paper, is a good way to keep track of assignments. There are endless options available. A few favorite recommendations: 

Use the calendar and notepad on their smartphone.

Use a handy pocket planner and organizer that includes a calendar with note section.

Evernote , a save everything app

Don’t forget to add in earlier reminders along with the assignment due date.

Don’t procrastinate

Even though we all know it’s not good to put things off until the last minute, it happens. One of the most important things to realize is that putting things off puts your student at a disadvantage. While your student doesn’t need to complete each assignment immediately, they should review it and start planning earlier by documenting what it’s going to take to get it done. This will help your student estimate the difficulty and give them time to seek out resources or help without running out of time. It’s pressure-free and they might even have time to polish up their work! 

Take notes in class

Your student should pick the note-taking method that best compliments their learning style. If they’re not sure, they can try them all before settling on “the one”. Don’t forget your laptop or trusty pen(cil) and paper. And of course, get to class on time!

Designate a study area

Studying in a workspace that allows you to avoid distractions, like a quiet area with a table, is often the most productive option. That way, your student can spread out and focus quickly. Students should find and create their go to place to do homework assignments, study for tests and quizzes, plan projects, put together presentations, and write papers.

Prioritize study time

Not all subjects are not created equal. When it comes to studying, focus more time on the harder subjects. If math is harder for you than English, they should spend more time studying more for math than English. Instead of cramming for tests, break study time into daily chunks. They’ll remember the material more easily, reduce stress and do better in the long run.

Class schedule balance

Students should avoid taking too many hard classes in the same semester, or four piece-of-cake classes. Balance allows students to focus more of their time on a couple hard classes and less of their time on the easier classes. See #5 above.

Take advantage of free tutoring

It’s how your student can stay ahead. Tutors help reinforce the things your student knows and can help them understand their academic struggles. And if you spend a little time at tutoring making sure you’re totally getting the concepts, you’re more likely to bounce back quicker if you fall off track in the class.

Go to professors’ office hours

Students should get to know their instructors. Every professor has open office hours  for at least an hour a week. They know that students who seek them out are taking their class seriously. Encourage your student to take the opportunity to talk with them about any course material they have questions about.

Eat well, sleep and exercise

A healthy body = a healthy mind. We all realize that the healthier we eat and the more we exercise, the better we feel. The better your student feels, the more ready they are to absorb information and perform well in their classes. 

Keep the goal in mind

There’s no way around it — going for a 4.00 means sacrifices will have to be made. Though your student won’t have to give up their social life entirely, they might have to occasionally skip some fun activities with friends. They should just keep reminding themselves of their goal. They shouldn’t freak out if they get a B. They can get some Bs and still earn a 4.00. They can make up for them by getting some A-pluses. If they ace the classes that come easier and do pretty well in the tougher classes, they can still stay in 4.00 territory.

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Daniel Wong

40 Good Habits for Students to Practise Every Day

Updated on February 15, 2024 By Daniel Wong 55 Comments

Students

Why are some students more successful than others?

While there are many possible reasons, it often comes down to one thing…

They know the good habits for students they ought to practise.

Students with good habits achieve the most success. These habits give them the structure they need to reach their goals.

So I’ve created a list of 40 good habits for students to practise every day.

As you develop these habits, you’ll become a happier, healthier and more successful student.

Enter your email below to download a PDF summary of this article. The PDF contains all the tips found here, plus  5 exclusive bonus tips that you’ll only find in the PDF.

Here are the best habits for students.

Good habits for students are ones that will serve you well in all areas of your life, not just in school .

The following list includes habits to improve your physical health, motivation, self-discipline, and more.

1. Write down the three to five most important tasks to accomplish for the day.

Without a written list to help you stay on track, it’s easy to overlook and put off important tasks.

By writing down your three to five most important tasks for the day, you’ll focus on the critical tasks, not just the urgent ones.

If you want to study smart and become more productive , start cultivating this habit today.

2. Update your calendar with key dates and events.

A calendar is a great way to stay on schedule, day after day, while also planning for the future.

Using a calendar for things related to school is one of the most important habits for students to stay organised.

You can use a physical calendar or an online one like Google Calendar to record test dates, project submission deadlines, term breaks, etc.

This way, you’ll be on top of things at all times.

3. Work on your most challenging task during your most productive time of day.

Tackle your most challenging task when your mind and body are fresh.

This will ensure that you have the energy to complete the task most efficiently. It’ll make the rest of your day more productive too!

4. Write down at least one thing you’re thankful for.

Are you thankful for your friends? How about your family? What about your education?

Gratitude is a good habit for students to practise daily. It only takes a couple of minutes to write down something you’re thankful for .

But this useful habit will help you find long-term success and happiness.

5. Perform focused deep breathing for two minutes.

Stress can negatively impact academic performance, but there’s a quick solution to this.

Deep breathing is scientifically proven to reduce stress and even increase willpower.

So take just two minutes and perform focused deep breathing every day.

I recommend that you do these deep breathing exercises right before tests and exams to relieve stress as well.

6. Read your favourite inspirational quote.

For a quick boost of motivation to study , read your favourite inspirational quote.

My personal favourite is this one by Jim Rohn: “Don’t wish it were easier. Wish you were better.” If you don’t have a favourite, here is a list for you to refer to.

7. Perform a random act of kindness.

You’ll feel better about yourself, as well as life in general, when you get into the excellent habit of performing a random act of kindness at least once a day.

This good habit for students to cultivate doesn’t require a lot of time.

It could be something as simple as giving someone a genuine compliment or giving up your seat on the bus.

8. Get five minutes of sun.

Sunlight

Be sure to include going outside in your list of healthy habits to practise.

There are many benefits of getting some sun every day.

For example, it improves brain function, enhances sleep quality, and reduces the risk of certain cancers.

So don’t spend your entire day cooped up inside!

9. Do something that scares you.

This is the best way to build courage and develop confidence.

Yes, it’s scary to face your fears, so I encourage you to start small. List your fears and decide on a tiny action you can take today to overcome just one of those fears.

10. Spend time with like-minded people whom you want to learn from.

As a student, you come in contact with many people throughout your day.

Spend time with like-minded individuals whom you want to learn from.

These people will change the way you think, while giving you advice about how to improve your life.

11. Eat breakfast within 30 minutes of waking up.

Eating breakfast is a healthy habit for students that you shouldn’t overlook.

It’s easy to find a reason to skip breakfast, but this is a mistake.

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and you should eat it within 30 minutes of rising.

This will give you the energy you need to take on the day.

12. Drink at least eight glasses of water.

The health benefits of drinking water are tremendous. Everyone knows they should drink eight glasses of water a day, but few people actually do this.

Make this a habit and your body will thank you down the road.

13. Exercise for at least 15 minutes.

You may not have time to hit the gym for an hour or two, but a short burst of daily exercise is an essential healthy habit for students.

Everyone can find 15 minutes in their day to exercise.

This can be as simple as going for a brisk walk or doing some calisthenics.

Over time, you’ll find that you’re more energetic and that you fall sick less often too.

14. Go to bed and wake up at roughly the same time every day.

It’s hard to be well-rested when your sleep schedule is all over the place.

You might find it hard to go to bed and wake up at exactly the same time every day, but try to stay within a 30-minute window.

15. Get at least eight hours of sleep every night.

Sleep

Getting enough sleep is a healthy habit that many students struggle to incorporate in their lives.

Most people need at least eight hours of sleep every night in order to function optimally.

So set your schedule to ensure that you’re working toward this goal.

(Learn how getting eight hours of sleep a night helped me to become a better – and happier – student.)

16. Follow a bedtime routine.

If you lack a bedtime routine, you may find it difficult to wind down and enter “sleep mode”.

Establish a routine that you can follow, night in and night out. This can be as simple as:

  • Take a shower
  • Dim the lights
  • Put on some relaxing music
  • Read a few pages of your favourite book
  • Journal for a few minutes
  • Turn off the lights

17. Set up your phone so that you receive reminders for things you have to do.

With a reminder or task app like Todoist , you can turn your phone into your personal assistant.

Set up your device to remind you of things you have to do, a meeting you have scheduled with your advisor, or a phone call you need to make.

18. If you’re trying to change a bad habit, set up a reward and punishment system.

Bad habits are hard to break . To give yourself an extra incentive, set up a reward and punishment system.

When you make progress, reward yourself. But when you take a step back, enforce a punishment. This holds you accountable, allowing you to change the habit sooner rather than later.

19. If you don’t understand something that was taught in school, clarify your doubts on that same day.

Even the best students don’t understand everything at first.

If you don’t understand a particular concept that your teacher talked about in class, clarify your doubts that same day. This good habit will ensure that you keep up with the material.

20. Create a study plan for any upcoming tests or exams.

Without a study plan to enable you to concentrate , you’ll lack the structure you need to best prepare for an upcoming test or exam.

Make your plan clear and specific, and add in timelines too.

If there’s one study tip you should implement , it’s this one!

21. Be at least five minutes early for every appointment.

Arriving late for an appointment is never a good idea.

It’s a good habit for students to arrive five minutes early for every appointment, as this will ease your stress and show the other person how much you care about the appointment.

22. Review your homework list.

Writing

There’s nothing worse than finding out you have an assignment due the next day that you haven’t even started on.

Guard against this by keeping your homework list current and combining it with reminders on your phone (see Point #17 above).

23. Before you start work, make sure you have all the materials and resources you need.

Organisation is essential to reaching your goals.

Before you start any task, make sure you have everything you need, e.g., notes, stationery, textbook, calculator.

Not only will this keep you organised for school-related tasks , it will also help you avoid unnecessary distractions and interruptions.

24. When memorising information, use mnemonic devices whenever possible.

For example, if you’re trying to memorise the electromagnetic spectrum, you might use this mnemonic device:

  • R icky (Radio)
  • M artin (Microwaves)
  • I s (Infrared)
  • V ery (Visible)
  • U nique (Ultraviolet) and
  • e X tremely (X-rays)
  • G lamorous (Gamma rays)

Such mnemonic devices help you to learn information faster, while aiding in recall too.

25. Focus on one task at a time; don’t multitask.

Research shows that multitasking negatively affects productivity. If you think you’re more productive by multitasking, you’re just tricking yourself.

So choose one task to work on and stick with it until you’re done. This study habit alone will make you a much better student!

26. Before you get down to work, remove all distractions.

There are many things you can do to avoid distractions while studying.

Before you begin your study session, remove as many distractions as possible, e.g., phone, Internet, games, unnecessary notes on your study table.

27. Break down a big task into several smaller ones.

A big task, such as a 10-page report, can be intimidating. But if you break that task down into 10 writing sessions of one page each, you’ll find it much easier to complete the report.

Adopt this approach and you’ll gradually overcome your habit of procrastination.

28. Whenever possible, do your regular homework at the same time and place every day.

Just as you should establish a sleep routine, you should also establish a homework routine to ensure that you don’t procrastinate .

Have a time and place for completing your regular homework, as this will improve your overall productivity and allow you to get your homework done faster .

29. Check through your homework after you’ve completed it.

Doing homework

As you reach the end of a homework assignment, you’ll probably begin to think about what you’re going to do during your break.

But don’t mark the assignment as “complete” until you’ve checked through it for mistakes.

This little bit of extra effort will pay off in the long run!

30. Take regular breaks – at least one every hour.

Research shows that taking regular breaks improves attention and productivity .

Taking one break an hour will keep you fresh, allowing you to work at your peak concentration for a longer period of time.

31. Give yourself a small reward after you complete each major task.

Reward systems don’t just work for young children.

Students benefit from such systems as well, as it gives you the incentive to work through a task in a timely manner.

32. Organise your notes and assignments.

Being organised is essential to succeeding in school , so establish good habits for staying on top of your schoolwork.

Take just 5 to 10 minutes every day to organise your notes and assignments.

When it’s time to prepare for your next test or exam, you won’t find yourself looking all over the place just to find the resources you need.

33. Clear your study table at the end of each day.

When your day comes to an end, clear your study table so that you’ll have a fresh start the following day.

You don’t want your day to start with a desk full of clutter, because this will likely make you feel unmotivated.

34. Read for at least 10 minutes a day.

With so many benefits of reading – from reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease to lowering stress levels – it’s something you should do every day.

I recommend that you include reading as part of your bedtime routine (see Point #16).

35. Whenever you face a problem, ask yourself: “What is one thing I can do right now to make the situation better?”

This is a difficult habit to get into, as many people instinctively shy away from a problem or try to think past it.

Don’t do this. Instead, find the one thing you can do right now to make the situation better.

This may not solve your problem immediately, but it will put you on the road to doing so.

36. Ask for help, if necessary.

This doesn’t mean you should always rely on others for answers, but there’s nothing wrong with reaching out for help when you’re stuck.

Furthermore, research shows that asking for advice makes a good impression on others.

37. Learn something outside the syllabus.

School has a syllabus, but life doesn’t. Learning for the sake of learning is an excellent habit for students to cultivate that will last a lifetime.

Every day, strive to learn something outside the school syllabus. I encourage you to read a book , take an online course, or learn a new skill.

There are so many resources available on the Internet, so the information is really just a click away.

38. Spend a few minutes reflecting on the day gone by.

Reflecting

At the end of each day, take the time to look back and reflect on what happened during the day.

Did you make progress toward your goals? What were your successes and failures? What good (and not-so-good) decisions did you make?

This simple habit of reflection will help you to get better, day by day.

39. Spend at least 15 minutes talking to your family.

You probably already know you should do this.

Family is one of the most important things in the world, so don’t take it for granted.

40. Spend 20 minutes doing something relaxing.

Maybe you enjoy listening to music to relax your mind and body. Or maybe you enjoy reading.

Whatever you prefer, give yourself 20 minutes a day to do something relaxing. This will help you to be a calm, relaxed, and positive person.

Start with just one new good habit

As you review this list of good habits for students to practise daily, remember that you’re always in a position to make a change.

It takes 21 days or more to develop a new habit , so there’s no such thing as overnight success.

But the process will be worth it.

Just make sure you don’t pick up any bad study habits along the way, which will hold your progress back.

As you develop good habits, you’ll experience positive changes. You’ll become a healthier, more productive, and more successful student. So get started today! 🙂

Like this article? Please share it with your friends.

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July 11, 2016 at 6:30 pm

that was really an interesting one.THANK YOU

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July 11, 2016 at 6:32 pm

You are welcome, Amala.

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September 14, 2020 at 11:07 pm

Thank you Daniel

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November 16, 2020 at 8:46 pm

sir this was really amazing i cant concentrate and i am a slow learner pls give me some tips

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May 1, 2021 at 3:20 pm

same happen with me one year ago , but not now . You should start reading at least 30 min or more by applying finger tips while reading this will improve quality and quantity as well and also helps you to read questions faster in exams

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December 8, 2019 at 11:21 pm

That is so informative . I really like it so much.

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February 5, 2020 at 1:04 pm

Thank you so much hopefully this we’ll improve my grade

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April 13, 2021 at 6:47 pm

Very very thank you Daniel, now i have started following the points that you gave. And I’m gonna do my best in my 10th Board Exams.

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July 11, 2016 at 11:05 pm

What do you do if when you sit down to do work and sometimes a random thought comes to you and you end up wasting more time than you expected?

July 12, 2016 at 9:11 am

Thanks for your question, Aaditya. I recommend that you read these two articles for tips to address your question: https://www.daniel-wong.com/2015/08/17/study-smart/ https://www.daniel-wong.com/2016/04/18/top-student/

Hope this helps!

July 14, 2016 at 12:34 am

Ok, thanks!

July 14, 2016 at 8:09 am

You’re welcome!

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August 17, 2020 at 3:46 am

If one strategy is not working, just change it . I have done the same and it worked.Thank you for giving the initiative.

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July 11, 2016 at 11:06 pm

you’ve helped me so much thank you!

July 12, 2016 at 9:08 am

You’re welcome, Nat!

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July 12, 2016 at 8:41 am

I have shared your blog with my friends as it is useful. Thanks

July 12, 2016 at 9:07 am

Thank you, Raja.

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July 12, 2016 at 7:36 pm

How long do you recommend the breaks should last?

July 13, 2016 at 9:33 am

I recommend that breaks should be 5 to 10 minutes long in general. After about 3 study sessions, you can take a longer break for lunch, exercise, etc.

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July 24, 2016 at 5:50 pm

I have problems coming up with a study plan and sticking to it. What should I do?

July 25, 2016 at 10:01 am

Hi Tricia, I recommend that you read this article: https://www.daniel-wong.com/2015/08/17/study-smart/

I also strongly recommend that you invest in this affordable system, which should address your challenge: https://www.daniel-wong.com/straight-a-student-weekly-checklist/

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August 23, 2018 at 2:36 am

how to be more focused of your home.work? in the start of your holiday

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September 19, 2018 at 6:31 am

This was such a helpful list!! I’m so glad you put all these important things all together! I had heard most of these things from different places here and there, but having them all together with explanations and tips to accomplish them is SUPER awesome! Thank you so much, Daniel!

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October 15, 2018 at 5:57 pm

thank u so much sir

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October 24, 2018 at 9:12 pm

Thankyou very much

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June 28, 2019 at 2:04 pm

How can we plan our study table and should we learn every subject everyday??

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October 30, 2018 at 5:34 pm

It is really fruitful to the student while they are practice

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November 1, 2018 at 9:14 am

Thank you sir..

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November 15, 2018 at 1:57 am

I read this and the first word I said was WOW amazing tips and I found some of them to follow it right now

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December 10, 2018 at 10:08 pm

Thank you sir!! It helped me a lot to overcome my stress.And i will follow this routine to success!!😃😃

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December 12, 2018 at 2:59 am

Listening to their elders and parents is another good habit for kids that should be taught by parents. This is a part of respecting their elders but this particular habit will also help them in their daily lives.

Source: https://www.thelearningapps.com/good-habits-every-parent-should-teach-their-children/

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January 9, 2019 at 3:14 pm

Thank you ! This article is very informative and practical as well .

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January 9, 2019 at 8:51 pm

Sir, nowadays I find my studies going so hard so I am unable to cope with it. What should I do sir in order to rise up above all and become a topper

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February 24, 2019 at 3:56 pm

Very interesting and helpful. Thank you.

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March 11, 2019 at 10:30 pm

I use to say everday that i will study when arriving at home or school maybe,,but once when i arrive am doing nothing,,and am just staying without doing anything concerned about my studies,,this thing is really frustrating me,,because the examination will be held soon,,so what can i do mr daniel to make to do better in my studies and examinations as well?? Help me please,,!

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March 17, 2019 at 9:30 pm

Please I need This Article In My Email It is Good

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March 20, 2019 at 11:45 am

Wow … That’s incredible .. Thank you . God bless you and your family.

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March 22, 2019 at 5:23 am

Thank you so much for this information, but my brother i still want to improve my poor English speaking, what should i do?

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September 3, 2019 at 12:02 am

Thank you so so much

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October 15, 2019 at 5:58 pm

Sir, what a great lesson up here. I so love these tips and will do my utmost best to practice them… but Sir. with regards to study, I have this tendency of feeling that I already know what’s ever I want to study. Also, anytime I pick a book to study, I get some serious brain tumor, and it holds me back for a while before I force myself to do the studies.. any advice here please..

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December 9, 2019 at 8:31 pm

Dear Daniel, Thanks so much for these very important articles, most of the time I use the tips drawn from your articles to support my son on improving on his study habits . Am glad to say he did so well his end of year exams and he was promoted to the next class. Be blessed.

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January 2, 2020 at 10:13 pm

thank you so much . i hope i improve .

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January 15, 2020 at 7:40 pm

Wonderfull.👏

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February 9, 2020 at 1:38 pm

So amazing !

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March 17, 2020 at 1:39 am

thank you very much sir

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April 15, 2020 at 3:30 am

This is very inspirational. Thank you

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May 27, 2020 at 5:32 am

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July 22, 2020 at 12:24 am

Thanks Daniel! I’ll try to implement these rules as much as I can in my daily routine.

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July 24, 2020 at 10:05 pm

Thanks Daniel! This was really helpful. But I had a doubt that if I am doing it right or not as I study in short bytes with 2 hours of interval

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September 28, 2020 at 8:11 pm

Thank you sir this is very useful for me during exam time when I’m stressed about my exams. These tips help, thank you so much ☺☺☺

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November 10, 2020 at 4:36 pm

This is an eye-opener! I now realise how I can tap into success! Thank you very much.

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November 23, 2020 at 6:18 pm

Your articles are all really inspiring for us. Thanks 😊

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December 25, 2020 at 1:35 pm

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December 28, 2020 at 9:00 pm

One of the best articles to change myself, thanks a lot.

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February 15, 2021 at 10:08 pm

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The Ten Study Habits of Successful Students

Successful students:

  • Try not to do too much studying at one time. If you try to do too much studying at one time, you will tire and your studying will not be very effective. Space the work you have to do over shorter periods of time. Taking short breaks will restore your mental energy.
  • Plan specific times for studying. Study time is any time you are doing something related to schoolwork. It can be completing assigned reading, working on a paper or project, or studying for a test. Schedule specific times throughout the week for your study time.
  • Try to study at the same times each day. Studying at the same times each day establishes a routine that becomes a regular part of your life, just like sleeping and eating. When a scheduled study time comes up during the day, you will be mentally prepared to begin studying.
  • Set specific goals for their study times. Goals will help you stay focused and monitor your progress. Simply sitting down to study has little value. You must be very clear about what you want to accomplish during your study times.
  • Start studying when planned. You may delay starting your studying because you don’t like an assignment or think it is too hard. A delay in studying is called “procrastination.” If you procrastinate for any reason, you will find it difficult to get everything done when you need to. You may rush to make up the time you wasted getting started, resulting in careless work and errors.
  • Review their notes before beginning an assignment. Reviewing your notes can help you make sure you are doing an assignment correctly. Also, your notes may include information that will help you complete an assignment.
  • Tell their friends not to call them during their study times. Two study problems can occur if your friends call you during your study times. First, your work is interrupted. It is not that easy to get back to what you were doing. Second, your friends may talk about things that will distract you from what you need to do. Here’s a simple idea – turn off your cell phone during your study times.
  • Call another student when they have difficulty with an assignment. This is a case where “two heads may be better than one.”
  • Review their schoolwork over the weekend. Yes, weekends should be fun time. But there is also time to do some review. This will help you be ready to go on Monday morning when another school week begins.

These ten study habits can help you throughout your education. Make sure they are your study habits.

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Study Habits of Highly Effective Students

Good Study Habits

10 Habits of Highly Effective Students

The key to becoming an effective student is learning how to study smarter, not harder. This becomes more and more true as you advance in your education. An hour or two of studying a day is usually sufficient to make it through high school with satisfactory grades, but when college arrives, there aren’t enough hours in the day to get all your studying in if you don’t know how to study smarter.

While some students are able to breeze through school with minimal effort, this is the exception. The vast majority of successful students achieve their success by developing and applying effective study habits. The following are the top 10 study habits employed by highly successful students. So if you want to become a successful student, don’t get discouraged, don’t give up, just work to develop each of the study habits below and you’ll see your grades go up, your knowledge increase, and your ability to learn and assimilate information improve.

1. Don’t attempt to cram all your studying into one session.

Ever find yourself up late at night expending more energy trying to keep your eyelids open than you are studying? If so, it’s time for a change. Successful students typically space their work out over shorter periods of time and rarely try to cram all of their studying into just one or two sessions. If you want to become a successful student then you need to learn to be consistent in your studies and to have regular, yet shorter, study periods.

Good Study Habits

2. Plan when you’re going to study.

Successful students schedule specific times throughout the week when they are going to study — and then they stick with their schedule. Students who study sporadically and whimsically typically do not perform as well as students who have a set study schedule. Even if you’re all caught up with your studies, creating a weekly routine, where you set aside a period of time a few days a week, to review your courses will ensure you develop habits that will enable you to succeed in your education long term.

3. Study at the same time.

Not only is it important that you plan when you’re going to study, it’s important you create a consistent, daily study routine. When you study at the same time each day and each week, you’re studying will become a regular part of your life. You’ll be mentally and emotionally more prepared for each study session and each study session will become more productive. If you have to change your schedule from time to time due to unexpected events, that’s okay, but get back on your routine as soon as the event has passed.

4. Each study time should have a specific goal.

Simply studying without direction is not effective. You need to know exactly what you need to accomplish during each study session. Before you start studying, set a study session goal that supports your overall academic goal (i.e. memorize 30 vocabulary words in order to ace the vocabulary section on an upcoming Spanish test.)

5. Never procrastinate your planned study session.

It’s very easy, and common, to put off your study session because of lack of interest in the subject, because you have other things you need to get done, or just because the assignment is hard. Successful students DO NOT procrastinate studying. If you procrastinate your study session, your studying will become much less effective and you may not get everything accomplished that you need to. Procrastination also leads to rushing, and rushing is the number one cause of errors.

6. Start with the most difficult subject first.

As your most difficult assignment or subject will require the most effort and mental energy, you should start with it first. Once you’ve completed the most difficult work, it will be much easier to complete the rest of your work. Believe it or not, starting with the most difficult subject will greatly improve the effectiveness of your study sessions, and your academic performance.

7. Always review your notes before starting an assignment.

Obviously, before you can review your notes you must first have notes to review. Always make sure to take good notes in class. Before you start each study session, and before you start a particular assignment, review your notes thoroughly to make sure you know how to complete the assignment correctly. Reviewing your notes before each study session will help you remember important subject matter learned during the day, and make sure your studying is targeted and effective.

8. Make sure you’re not distracted while you’re studying.

Everyone gets distracted by something. Maybe it’s the TV. Or maybe it’s your family. Or maybe it’s just too quite. Some people actually study better with a little background noise. When you’re distracted while studying you (1) lose your train of thought and (2) are unable to focus — both of which will lead to very ineffective studying. Before you start studying find a place where you won’t be disturbed or distracted. For some people this is a quiet cubical in the recesses of the library. For others is in a common area where there is a little background noise.

9. Use study groups effectively.

Ever heard the phrase “two heads are better than one?” Well this can be especially true when it comes to studying. Working in groups enables you to (1) get help from others when you’re struggling to understand a concept, (2) complete assignments more quickly, and (3) teach others, whereby helping both the other students and yourself to internalize the subject matter. However, study groups can become very ineffective if they’re not structured and if groups members come unprepared. Effective students use study groups effectively.

10. Review your notes, schoolwork and other class materials over the weekend.

Successful students review what they’ve learned during the week over the weekend. This way they’re well prepared to continue learning new concepts that build upon previous coursework and knowledge acquired the previous week.

We’re confident that if you’ll develop the habits outlined above that you’ll see a major improvement in your academic success.

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Academic Skills Center Blog

5 Ways to Enjoy your Academic Journey

Author: Mahrosh Gealani

Though it can be a bit tough at times, academic life can actually be quite a fun and fulfilling adventure if you tackle it with the right attitude. As the final exams approach us, here are five friendly tips to make your academic journey even more enjoyable:

  • Set Clear Goals : Do you plan to complete the entire assignment for that one class today, or is today dedicated to research? Keep in mind that an assignment can have multiple parts, so the goal is to complete what you can today. Try to break the tasks apart and tackle the first small chunk today.
  • Maintain a Healthy Work-Life Balance : Remember, it's important to maintain a lifestyle that balances out academic stresses. Have you taken a walk or called a friend today? A structured routine outside of academia can help keep you grounded. Have you tried the  ASC’s Take a Break Bingo ?
  • Embrace Challenges : Overcoming challenges boosts our confidence. It's beneficial to embrace difficulties, whether they stem from situations, assignments, or just challenging days. Try to make it through such days with a healthy lunch, a chat with friends, or a long walk can bring a sense of accomplishment.
  • Find a Supportive Community : Surround yourself with people who radiate positive energy and attitude. We all have challenging days and nobody can maintain positivity 100 percent of the time. It's crucial to find a community that understands we may face difficulties, but also encourages perseverance. Call or text a loved one, join workshops that help with navigating academic stress, like our MoTEAvational Monday workshops, or go on a coffee date with friends after a day of studying.
  • Celebrate Your Achievements : Setting small goals can motivate you to focus on the larger objective and make it more manageable. If you're having trouble with your goals, consider breaking them into smaller parts. Have you tried the ASC’s “4 Steps to Task Initiation” worksheet?

Remember, the process of academic journey is not always perfect or linear. Learn to embrace the small steps. If you would like someone to walk you through your academic journey, visit one of our wonderful Academic Coaches!

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K-12 students learned a lot last year, but they're still missing too much school

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Cory Turner

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Sequoia Carrillo

good study habits in students

From 2022-2023, chronic absenteeism declined in 33 of the 39 states AEI looked at. But it was still a persistent problem: In a handful of places, including Nevada, Washington, D.C., Michigan, New Mexico and Oregon, roughly 1 in 3 students – or more – were chronically absent. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

From 2022-2023, chronic absenteeism declined in 33 of the 39 states AEI looked at. But it was still a persistent problem: In a handful of places, including Nevada, Washington, D.C., Michigan, New Mexico and Oregon, roughly 1 in 3 students – or more – were chronically absent.

It's going to take aggressive interventions to repair the pandemic's destructive impact on kids' schooling.

That's the takeaway of two big new studies that look at how America's K-12 students are doing. There's some good news in this new research, to be sure – but there's still a lot of work to do on both student achievement and absenteeism. Here's what to know:

1. Students are starting to make up for missed learning

From spring 2022 to spring 2023, students made important learning gains, making up for about one-third of the learning they had missed in math and a quarter of the learning they had missed in reading during the pandemic.

That's according to the newly updated Education Recovery Scorecard , a co-production of Harvard University's Center for Education Policy Research and The Educational Opportunity Project at Stanford University.

6 things we've learned about how the pandemic disrupted learning

6 things we've learned about how the pandemic disrupted learning

The report says, "Students learned 117 percent in math and 108 percent in reading of what they would typically have learned in a pre-pandemic school year."

In an interview with NPR's All Things Considered , Stanford professor Sean Reardon said that's surprisingly good news: "A third or a quarter might not sound like a lot, but you have to realize the losses from 2019 to 2022 were historically large."

When the same team of researchers did a similar review last year, they found that, by spring of 2022, the average third- through eighth-grader had missed half a grade level in math and a third of a grade level in reading. So, the fact that students are now making up ground is a good sign.

These results do come with a few caveats, including that the researchers were only able to review data and draw their conclusions from 30 states this year.

2. Despite that progress, very few states are back to pre-pandemic learning levels

The Harvard and Stanford study of student learning includes one sobering sentence: "Alabama is the only state where average student achievement exceeds pre-pandemic levels in math." And average achievement in reading has surpassed pre-pandemic levels in just three of the states they studied: Illinois, Louisiana and Mississippi. Every other state for which they had data has yet to reach pre-pandemic levels in math and reading.

"Many schools made strong gains last year, but most districts are still working hard just to reach pre-pandemic achievement levels," said Harvard's Thomas Kane, one of the learning study's co-authors.

3. Chronic absenteeism also improved in many places ... slightly

The rate of chronic absenteeism – the percentage of students who miss 10% or more of a school year – declined from 2022 to 2023. That's according to research by Nat Malkus at the conservative-leaning American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He found chronic absenteeism declined in 33 of the 39 states he studied.

Yes, "the differences were relatively small," Malkus writes, but it's improvement nonetheless: "the average chronic absenteeism rate across these states in 2023 was 26 percent, down from 28 percent for the same 39 states in 2022."

Glass half-full: Things aren't getting worse.

4. But, again, chronic absenteeism is still high

Malkus found chronic absenteeism was at 26% in 2023. Before the pandemic, in 2019, those same states reported a rate of 15%. That adds some painful context to the "good news" two-point decline in absenteeism from 2022 to 2023. Sure, it's down, but it's still so much higher than it was and should be.

Think of it this way: In 2023, roughly 1 student out of 4 was still chronically absent across the school year.

In a handful of places, including Nevada, Washington, D.C., Michigan, New Mexico and Oregon, roughly 1 in 3 students – or more – were chronically absent. That's a crisis.

Research shows a strong connection between absenteeism and all kinds of negative consequences for students, including an increased likelihood of dropping out of school.

Chronic absenteeism also hurts the students who don't miss school. That's because, as the learning study's authors point out, when absent students return, they require extra attention and "make it hard for teachers to keep the whole class moving."

5. Poverty matters (as always)

Both the learning and the chronic absenteeism studies capture the headwinds that constantly buffet children in poverty.

"No one wants poor children to foot the bill for the pandemic," said Harvard's Kane, "but that is the path that most states are on."

On learning: Reardon told NPR "the pandemic really exacerbated inequality between students in high-poverty and low-poverty districts and students of different racial and ethnic backgrounds."

In 2023, students' academic recovery was relatively strong across groups, which is good – but it means "the inequality that was widened during the pandemic hasn't gotten smaller, and in some places it's actually gotten larger," Reardon told NPR.

In fact, the report says, "in most states, achievement gaps between rich and poor districts are even wider now than they were before the pandemic." The learning study singles out Massachusetts and Michigan as the states where those gaps in math and reading achievement widened the most between poor and non-poor students.

Similarly, Malkus, at AEI, found that, between 2019 and 2022, rates of chronic absenteeism rose much more in high-poverty districts (up from 20% to 37%) than in low-poverty districts (up from 12% to 23%).

"Chronic absenteeism has increased the most for disadvantaged students," Malkus writes, "those who also experienced the greatest learning losses during the pandemic and can least afford the harms that come with chronic absenteeism."

6. Families must play an important role in learning recovery

Both studies acknowledge that families must play an important role in helping students – and schools – find a healthy, post-pandemic normal. The problem is, surveys show parents and guardians often underestimate the pandemic's toll on their children's learning . "Parents cannot advocate effectively for their children's future if they are misinformed," says the learning study.

To combat this, the learning researchers propose that districts be required to inform parents if their child is below grade-level in math or English. Those parents could then enroll their students in summer learning, tutoring and after-school programs, all of which have benefitted from federal COVID relief dollars. That funding is set to expire this fall, and some of these learning recovery opportunities may dry up, so the clock is ticking.

7. There's a "culture problem" around chronic absenteeism

Reducing chronic absenteeism, Malkus says, will also depend on families.

"This is a culture problem," Malkus tells NPR. "And in schools and in communities, culture eats policy for breakfast every day."

By "culture problem," Malkus is talking about how families perceive the importance of daily attendance relative to other challenges in their lives. He says some parents seem more inclined now to let their students miss school for various reasons, perhaps not realizing the links between absenteeism and negative, downstream consequences.

"Look, the patterns and routines of going to school were disrupted and to some degree eroded during the pandemic," Malkus says. "And I don't think we've had a decisive turn back that we need to have, to turn this kind of behavior around, and it's going to stay with students until that culture changes."

How do you do that? Malkus points to some low-cost options — like texting or email campaigns to increase parental involvement and encourage kids to get back in school – but says these, alone, aren't "up to the scale of what we're facing now."

Higher-cost options for schools to consider could include door-knocking campaigns, sending staff on student home-visits and requiring that families of chronically absent students meet in-person with school staff.

The learning study goes one step further: "Elected officials, employers, and community leaders should launch public awareness campaigns and other initiatives to lower student absenteeism." Because, after all, students can't make up for the learning they missed during the pandemic if they don't consistently attend school now.

What both of these studies make clear is there is no one solution that will solve these problems, and success will require further investment, aggressive intervention and patience.

Malkus says, even the high-cost, high-return options will likely only drive down chronic absenteeism by about four percentage points. A big win, he says, "but four percentage points against 26% isn't going to get us where we need to go."

Edited by: Nicole Cohen Visual design and development by: LA Johnson and Aly Hurt

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‘good’ fats can help control damaging bouts of inflammation in colitis.

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An overly robust immune response to usually harmless germs has been linked to colitis, a potentially severe inflammation of the colon that afflicts millions of people worldwide. A new Yale-led study not only reveals that the presence of one class of fatty acids is the hidden villain that quietly triggers this inflammation, but also found that another group of fats — unsaturated fats such as those found in olive oil — can alleviate symptoms of colitis in mice.

The findings were published Feb. 21 in the journal Nature .

“ How we metabolize fats has a direct connection to inflammatory response in colitis,” said Yale’s Richard Flavell , Sterling Professor of Immunobiology and co-corresponding author of the paper.

The cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), part of the innate immune system, is essential for suppressing inflammatory responses in the gut.  In fact, children born without IL-10 need bone marrow transplants which can produce the cytokine in order to survive. Mice that are genetically altered to lack IL-10 develop severe cases of colitis. Yet despite the importance of IL-10 in maintaining intestinal health, the specific mechanisms through which IL-10 subdues inflammation remain unclear.

In the new study, a team of researchers from Yale and UCLA — led by Autumn York, a former member of Flavell’s lab — found that the absence of IL-10 leads to a reorganization of immune cell fatty acids. Specifically, the researchers found that the lack of IL-10 enhanced the production of a particularly damaging type of fatty acid, known as ceramides. High levels of ceramides have been shown to be more predictive of heart disease than cholesterol.

York, now an assistant professor at the University of Washington, wondered what would happen if ceramides were eliminated in mice with immune systems genetically altered to mimic those of humans. To the surprise of researchers, mice without specific ceramides showed a strong reduction in colitis even in the absence of IL-10.  The presence of specific types of fatty acids, they determined, regulated the severity of the immune response.

“ Once we understood what fatty acids were important, we hoped to use our knowledge of metabolic pathways to find a way to counteract these inflammatory fats via dietary correction,” York said. Indeed, symptoms of colitis dissipated in mice lacking IL-10 when they were fed a diet of unsaturated fats such as those found in olive oil.

“ Immune cells have evolved to read their environment — and they use this information to dictate the severity of the immune response,” York said.

The researchers said that it is possible that diets high in unsaturated fats may be beneficial in treating colitis. They are studying whether similar specific classes of fatty acids might be present in other inflammatory diseases.

Flavell is an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).  York is a Hannah Gray Fellow with HHMI. Steven Bensinger, a professor of immunology at UCLA, is co-senior author of the paper.

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Brushing Up On Your Pet’s Dental Care

Close up of a Border Collie being held and looking direct into the camera. A loving expression on the dogs face.

February is National Pet Dental Health Month, but maintaining good dental health for pets is essential year-round, as dental problems can also impact overall health.

Dr. Adriana Regalado, a clinical assistant professor of dentistry at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, offers insights into the importance of good dental health and how personalized cleaning routines can significantly improve the quality of life for pets, preventing unnecessary pain and discomfort.

Importance Of Good Oral Health

The mouth is the first stop for food in the gastrointestinal system and is home to various bacteria, including some that are beneficial for digestion and others that can be harmful to health when left to multiply. The teeth of domestic cats and dogs are covered by a layer of good bacteria, saliva and some food debris, but if the layer is not removed within a couple of days, it will become thicker and stickier.

An overgrowth of harmful bacteria or toxins in a pet’s mouth can cause periodontal disease, a common dental condition characterized by inflammation and infection of the gums and bones surrounding the teeth.

“Dental care and hygiene are extremely important because they can have a very profound effect on the body of animals,” Regalado said. “If an animal has severe dental disease, they can swallow harmful bacteria and toxins along with food particles, causing negative changes in other areas of their body.”

Small molecules, such as cytokine and leukotriene, are released by cells to control the body’s response to the disease, but too much of these molecules can lead to excessive inflammation and cause damage to the swollen gums and bones.

“Good dental health prevents periodontal disease and the chronic inflammation associated with it, which, in turn, controls an excess production of cytokine and leukotriene that will circulate in the body and eventually cause your pet to feel unwell, compromising their immune system and vital organs in the process,” Regalado explained. “Dental hygiene really makes a difference in keeping your pet disease free.”

Periodontal disease can lead to additional conditions that cause physical pain, including, but not limited to, tooth decay and sensitivity; gum recession and root exposure; the formation of an abscess, or a pocket of infection around a tooth’s root; and, in some cases, significant bleeding and jaw fractures.

Recognizing signs of poor dental health early allows owners to seek timely veterinary care and prevent the progression of dental problems while reducing the risk of developing associated health issues.

Signs of poor dental health include:

  • Red or bleeding gums
  • Excessive or bloody drool
  • Behavior changes

Such symptoms may be caused by an oronasal fistula, an abnormal connection between the mouth and nose.

“Owners need to be aware of behavior changes as well,” Regalado said. “They may notice that their pets are pawing at their faces; for example, if cats have some pain, they will start rubbing their face. Dogs that are friendly and playful may suddenly not want to be touched on the face, want to interact with you, or play at the dog park.”

Regalado pointed out that if pets are in pain, they may have trouble eating and drinking as well.

Cleaning Routines

Good dental routines, which promote healthy teeth and gums, include brushing; feeding appropriate diets, such as including dental treats in the diet; and monitoring at home.

“Brushing a pet’s teeth and surveillance go hand-in-hand because if your pet has a dental concern, such as an abnormal lump or bump in the mouth or a broken tooth, you will immediately notice it while brushing,” Regalado said. “If you don’t have a brushing routine, a concern can become worse — that small lump may be a tumor that continues growing to the point that your pet cannot swallow or a broken tooth will be there until your pet develops a tooth abscess.”

Yet not all dental care routines are one-size-fits-all, as individual pets may have unique dental needs that require personalized attention. Owners also may have needs that must be considered.

“Cleaning routines must be tailored to the individual pet by a veterinarian,” Regalado said. “For example, if you have a small-breed dog, dental treats and brushing are not going to be enough because their mouth structures are more susceptible to periodontal disease. A veterinarian will most likely recommend a certain type of toothpaste, a water additive (like a mouthwash for pets), and more frequent dental visits.

“Routines should also be tailored to the owner, something that is practical and achievable based on their capabilities,” Regalado continued. “A veterinarian will be able to assist in developing a dental hygiene routine that works best for both you and your pet.”

Board-certified veterinary dentists can also be found through the American Veterinary Dental College , and the Veterinary Oral Health Council offers tips on dental products for owners.

By staying vigilant for signs of dental issues and implementing appropriate cleaning routines with the help of a veterinarian, pet owners can ensure their pets maintain good oral health and overall well-being, ultimately enhancing their quality of life.

Media contact: Jennifer Gauntt, [email protected]

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  1. 11 Good Study Habits to Develop

    Here are 11 tips to improve your study habits: Find a good place to study. Minimize distractions. Take breaks. Space out your studying. Set study goals for each session. Reward yourself. Study with a group. Take practice tests.

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    Good Study Habits. 1. Time Management. Time management refers to being able to efficiently allocate your time so you don't run out of time, and so you have enough time to allocate to all important tasks. As a basis, you could initiate a dedicated study schedule, specifying the time slots for each subject.

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    6. Take Breaks. The brain can only absorb so much information at a time. According to the National Institutes of Health, research has shown that taking breaks in between study sessions boosts retention. Studies have shown that wakeful rest plays just as important a role as practice in learning a new skill.

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    Designate a study area. The best study spot is one that is quiet, well-lit, and in a low-traffic area. Make sure there is a clear workspace to study and write on. Everyone's needs are different, so it is important you find a spot that works for you. Study in short bursts. For every 30 minutes you study, take a short 10-15 minute break to ...

  6. 13 Effective Study Habit Examples: Improve Your Study Routine

    Schedule study sessions in two, 30-minute to one hour blocks. Take short 5- to 10-minute breaks in between. When you take breaks, you allow your mind to rest, revitalize and be ready for more learning. If you want to see what this looks like then here are 17 free study plan templates.

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    In fact, for many students the term "study habits" probably gives the notion of habits a negative vibe. But there is another type of habit that is important for the well-being and positive growth of students: habits that build their character strengths, such as patience, gratitude, and service to others. For example, the habit cue that ...

  8. 10 Highly Effective Study Habits of Successful Students

    The Importance of Good Study Habits. Effective study habits form the cornerstone of effective learning. They provide a roadmap to navigate the often challenging terrain of education. These habits help students understand and retain information more effectively, reducing the need for last-minute cramming and stress associated with studying.

  9. How to Study Better in High School: 16 Expert Tips

    In Pile 1, place the cards you knew and answered correctly, in Pile 2, place the cards you didn't know the answers to. Now go back through the cards again, but only studying the cards from Pile 2 (the "didn't know" pile). Separate these again as you go through them into Pile 1 (know) and Pile 2 (don't know).

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    Study habits for success: tips for students Published: January 4, 2018 3:32pm EST ... You can create similar analogies in your own study, and if you combine it with good sleep, spaced practice ...

  11. 10 Study Habits of Highly Effective Students

    Reviewing your notes before each study session will help you remember important subject matter learned during the day, and make sure your studying is targeted and effective. 8. Make sure you're not distracted while you're studying. Everyone gets distracted by something. Maybe it's the TV. Or maybe it's your family.

  12. How to help teens develop good study habits

    At a glance. Teens often have to learn good study habits. Making weekly and daily plans can help kids organize what they need to study. Building in rewards for each task accomplished can help kids study more effectively. Good study habits don't always come easily or naturally. Most teens need to be taught how to develop them.

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    1. The enemies of good study habits. The secret to improving study motivation and building good study habits is to realize it's a game of two halves—you must play both offense and defense. This means you need to both defend against distractions and set your mind to do the work. Think of your brain as a sort of council.

  15. Supporting good study habits

    Supporting good study habits. Earning a perfect (or near perfect) GPA is an attainable goal for sure — your student just needs a plan. It can't hurt to be proactive and talk with your student as the new semester begins. The next time you have some time with your student, ask them about school, "Ready for school?" or "How's school ...

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    Developing good study habits is essential for students of all ages. Students can learn to focus and stay on task by forming a regular study routine, improving their productivity and academic performance. Good study habits also help students develop a sense of responsibility and independence, preparing them for the challenges of college and beyond.

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    4. Organize a Study Group. Studying on your own works well for many subjects, but it also might be easier to learn the material if you can bounce ideas off of your classmates. During your first year at college, give group study sessions a try. There's a good chance your fellow students will be interested in getting together to review course ...

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    By carving out time to work on your project pieces, you'll be well on your way to completing your assignments. 3. Use the Pomodoro Method. This is one of my favorite study habits and one that I still use today in my work. More than once I've sat down to work on a piece of a project and then felt like it would never end.

  19. An Analysis of Study Habits for Students in the U.S.

    According to our analysis, popcorn is the most popular snack while studying, beloved by 23.2% of students. Other fan favorites include fruits, crackers, granola bars and trail mix, respectively. For a beverage, water is the go-to for nearly three in 10 students (28.2%), closely followed by iced coffee (25.7%) and hot coffee (14.9%). 11.2% of ...

  20. 40 Good Habits for Students to Practise Every Day

    Here are the best habits for students. Good habits for students are ones that will serve you well in all areas of your life, not just in school. The following list includes habits to improve your physical health, motivation, self-discipline, and more. 1. Write down the three to five most important tasks to accomplish for the day.

  21. The Ten Study Habits of Successful Students

    Successful students have good study habits. They apply these habits to all of their classes. Read about each study habit. Work to develop any study habit you do not have. Successful students: Try not to do too much studying at one time. If you try to do too much studying at one time, you will tire and your studying will not be very effective.

  22. Study Habits of Highly Effective Students

    If you want to become a successful student then you need to learn to be consistent in your studies and to have regular, yet shorter, study periods. Good Study Habits. 2. Plan when you're going to study. Successful students schedule specific times throughout the week when they are going to study — and then they stick with their schedule.

  23. (PDF) THE LEARNERS' STUDY HABITS AND ITS RELATION ON ...

    Study habits are at the core of a learner's academic success. It is an action like reading, taking notes, conducting study groups that students perform frequently, and regularly accomplishing the ...

  24. Study like a champ: Teaching strategies for today's first-year students

    February 29, 2024. Webinar. 2 - 3 pm ET. Authors of "Study Like a Champ," Dr. Regan Gurung and Dr. John Dunlosky, discuss how instructors can help foster good study skills and other beneficial habits for today's first-year college students.

  25. Habits

    February 22, 2024 f0070pm. Author: Mahrosh Gealani. Though it can be a bit tough at times, academic life can actually be quite a fun and fulfilling adventure if you tackle it with the right attitude. As the final exams approach us, here are five friendly tips to make your academic journey even more enjoyable: Set Clear Goals: Do you plan to ...

  26. Students are still absent and making up for missed learning post ...

    That's the takeaway of two big new studies that look at how America's K-12 students are doing. There's some good news in this new research, to be sure - but there's still a lot of work to do on ...

  27. 'Good' fats can help control damaging bouts of ...

    A new Yale-led study not only reveals that the presence of one class of fatty acids is the hidden villain that quietly triggers this inflammation, but also found that another group of fats — unsaturated fats such as those found in olive oil — can alleviate symptoms of colitis in mice. The findings were published Feb. 21 in the journal Nature.

  28. Brushing Up On Your Pet's Dental Care

    Good dental routines, which promote healthy teeth and gums, include brushing; feeding appropriate diets, such as including dental treats in the diet; and monitoring at home. "Brushing a pet's teeth and surveillance go hand-in-hand because if your pet has a dental concern, such as an abnormal lump or bump in the mouth or a broken tooth, you ...